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Sand Key doesn't need Biltmore hotel on south end

Those were the days: Aerial view of Sand Key in the 1960s shows pristine beaches and no development on the barrier island. Condo development began on the small key in the 1980s, and changed the landscape. The original Clearwater Pass Bridge is shown at the top of the photo. The view is looking north toward Clearwater Beach.

Arcadia Publishing

Those were the days: Aerial view of Sand Key in the 1960s shows pristine beaches and no development on the barrier island. Condo development began on the small key in the 1980s, and changed the landscape. The original Clearwater Pass Bridge is shown at the top of the photo. The view is looking north toward Clearwater Beach.

Re: Remembering a better Sand Key | letter by Mark Hepburn, March 29

Sand Key lesson: Ban new hotel

Yeah, I, too, remember a very different Sand Key, when there were no condos there and where I could park anywhere along Gulf Boulevard when taking my kids to the beach.

I also remember in those days back in the 1960s when I would have a very leisurely drive to work down Ulmerton Road, which was a deserted two-lane road through a pine forest.

Wake up! Things have changed and I certainly agree that all changes are not necessarily for the better. In particular, the city of Clearwater should in no way allow the Belleview Biltmore to build a hotel in the completely residential area on the south end of Sand Key. It makes no sense and it is not fair to the residents of Sand Key.

Perhaps the city commissioners would like hotels next to their residences!

Bernie Browne, Sand Key, Clearwater

Re: County okays preserve land use changes March 19 story

Official is praised for Brooker vote

Kudos to Pinellas County Commissioner Neil Brickfield for trying to keep the Brooker Creek Preserve a preserve. It is unfortunate that commissioners Susan Latvala, Nancy Bostock, Calvin Harris and Ken Welch are not honorable enough to enforce their own land use plan. Remember this at election time!

David Hollingsworth, St. Petersburg

Abandoned pets need our help

I'm writing this in the hope that it will alert others to use their eyes and ears to help pets that have been abandoned in empty houses and apartments by owners who have moved out.

I recently called about a dog. It was found to have been locked in for at least a month with no food or water, no heat or air conditioning. I was told that its bones were sticking out and that its hair was falling out. It would have soon died.

If anyone sees an empty dwelling, and you either hear or see a pet inside, or remember that the former tenants had an animal, please check if it is in there alone. You can call the police department and remain anonymous if you wish. And for those who are thinking of leaving animals behind, please consider calling animal control, Friends of Strays or some other pet rescue group.

Animals can't help themselves in these situations. It's up to us.

Judy Greene, St. Petersburg

Mail carriers cut; execs get perks

After recently receiving cards in the mail from the United States Postal Service regarding changes in our mail delivery times, one would think that the Postal Service was in dire straits. I personally don't believe that's entirely true.

The Feb. 23 issue of the Washington Times stated that in 2008 U.S. Postmaster General John E. Potter earned $800,000 in pay and perks, which certainly isn't bad, especially during these tough economic times.

Not only that though: Potter has vowed to freeze postal executive salaries at 2008 levels, when compensation packages were generous. We can see that Potter is not only looking out for himself, but he's also doing so for his cronies.

The downside for us regular folks is that mail carriers are getting cut, leaving the rest to double-up on their routes, and six-day mail delivery may be cut down to five days a week. Oh yes, Potter also wants to raise the postage rate by 2 cents.

The mail carriers are the backbone of the U.S. Postal Service and they have the toughest jobs. Yet when it comes to salaries, bonuses and other kinds of perks, it's the upper echelon of big-wigs like Potter that reap the harvest. Indeed, while the U.S. Postal Service is crying poor, it looks to me as though they've become another extension of Wall Street.

JoAnn Lee Frank, Clearwater

>>Your voice counts

You may submit a letter to the editor for possible publication through our Web site at www.tampabay.com/letters, or by faxing it to (727) 445-4119, or by mailing it to Letters, 710 Court St., Clearwater, FL 33756. You must include your name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity, taste and length.

Sand Key doesn't need Biltmore hotel on south end 04/02/09 Sand Key doesn't need Biltmore hotel on south end 04/02/09 [Last modified: Thursday, April 2, 2009 6:04pm]

    

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Sand Key doesn't need Biltmore hotel on south end

Those were the days: Aerial view of Sand Key in the 1960s shows pristine beaches and no development on the barrier island. Condo development began on the small key in the 1980s, and changed the landscape. The original Clearwater Pass Bridge is shown at the top of the photo. The view is looking north toward Clearwater Beach.

Arcadia Publishing

Those were the days: Aerial view of Sand Key in the 1960s shows pristine beaches and no development on the barrier island. Condo development began on the small key in the 1980s, and changed the landscape. The original Clearwater Pass Bridge is shown at the top of the photo. The view is looking north toward Clearwater Beach.

Re: Remembering a better Sand Key | letter by Mark Hepburn, March 29

Sand Key lesson: Ban new hotel

Yeah, I, too, remember a very different Sand Key, when there were no condos there and where I could park anywhere along Gulf Boulevard when taking my kids to the beach.

I also remember in those days back in the 1960s when I would have a very leisurely drive to work down Ulmerton Road, which was a deserted two-lane road through a pine forest.

Wake up! Things have changed and I certainly agree that all changes are not necessarily for the better. In particular, the city of Clearwater should in no way allow the Belleview Biltmore to build a hotel in the completely residential area on the south end of Sand Key. It makes no sense and it is not fair to the residents of Sand Key.

Perhaps the city commissioners would like hotels next to their residences!

Bernie Browne, Sand Key, Clearwater

Re: County okays preserve land use changes March 19 story

Official is praised for Brooker vote

Kudos to Pinellas County Commissioner Neil Brickfield for trying to keep the Brooker Creek Preserve a preserve. It is unfortunate that commissioners Susan Latvala, Nancy Bostock, Calvin Harris and Ken Welch are not honorable enough to enforce their own land use plan. Remember this at election time!

David Hollingsworth, St. Petersburg

Abandoned pets need our help

I'm writing this in the hope that it will alert others to use their eyes and ears to help pets that have been abandoned in empty houses and apartments by owners who have moved out.

I recently called about a dog. It was found to have been locked in for at least a month with no food or water, no heat or air conditioning. I was told that its bones were sticking out and that its hair was falling out. It would have soon died.

If anyone sees an empty dwelling, and you either hear or see a pet inside, or remember that the former tenants had an animal, please check if it is in there alone. You can call the police department and remain anonymous if you wish. And for those who are thinking of leaving animals behind, please consider calling animal control, Friends of Strays or some other pet rescue group.

Animals can't help themselves in these situations. It's up to us.

Judy Greene, St. Petersburg

Mail carriers cut; execs get perks

After recently receiving cards in the mail from the United States Postal Service regarding changes in our mail delivery times, one would think that the Postal Service was in dire straits. I personally don't believe that's entirely true.

The Feb. 23 issue of the Washington Times stated that in 2008 U.S. Postmaster General John E. Potter earned $800,000 in pay and perks, which certainly isn't bad, especially during these tough economic times.

Not only that though: Potter has vowed to freeze postal executive salaries at 2008 levels, when compensation packages were generous. We can see that Potter is not only looking out for himself, but he's also doing so for his cronies.

The downside for us regular folks is that mail carriers are getting cut, leaving the rest to double-up on their routes, and six-day mail delivery may be cut down to five days a week. Oh yes, Potter also wants to raise the postage rate by 2 cents.

The mail carriers are the backbone of the U.S. Postal Service and they have the toughest jobs. Yet when it comes to salaries, bonuses and other kinds of perks, it's the upper echelon of big-wigs like Potter that reap the harvest. Indeed, while the U.S. Postal Service is crying poor, it looks to me as though they've become another extension of Wall Street.

JoAnn Lee Frank, Clearwater

>>Your voice counts

You may submit a letter to the editor for possible publication through our Web site at www.tampabay.com/letters, or by faxing it to (727) 445-4119, or by mailing it to Letters, 710 Court St., Clearwater, FL 33756. You must include your name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for clarity, taste and length.

Sand Key doesn't need Biltmore hotel on south end 04/02/09 Sand Key doesn't need Biltmore hotel on south end 04/02/09 [Last modified: Thursday, April 2, 2009 6:04pm]

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

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