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Nick Anderson | Houston Chronicle

Mike Luckovich | Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Saturday's letters: Obama's foreign policy has been disastrous

Where's the outrage? It's been a solid month since this country was viciously attacked and, to date, virtually nothing is being done about it. Our president seems to be more interested in getting re-elected than defending the country. In fact he is doing everything he can to confuse and cover up the administration's foreign policy failures and the disastrous consequences of not providing adequate protection for our ambassador to Libya.

Moreover, the Times, along with most of the mainstream media, are standing by and allowing the president to get away with this damnable behavior. Richard Nixon was driven out of office for his part in Watergate and lying to the American public. This scandal is much worse. We have four dead Americans killed in the line of duty and no one is even asking the right questions — i.e., what happened, who's responsible, and what are we going to do about it? Duty, honor, country. Those ideals used to mean something in the United States of America. Evidently they don't anymore.

Dave Groff, Homosassa

Hero of war, and peace | Oct. 11

A legacy of achievement

LifePath Hospice and the entire hospice community were saddened to hear of the passing of congressman Sam Gibbons. Mr. Gibbons was instrumental in establishing the Medicare hospice benefit, which allowed more and more seniors the ability to access considerate and comprehensive end-of-life care.

While Mr. Gibbons' legendary achievements will be long remembered here in the Tampa Bay area, patients and families — across the country — who are facing the challenges of life-limiting conditions will forever benefit from his foresight and compassion.

Kathy Fernandez, president, Chapters Health System/LifePath Hospice, Temple Terrace

Mindful of others' needs

I would like to express to Sam Gibbons' family my appreciation for his long service to his country. I understand and appreciate his efforts on our behalf.

My deceased husband was also a veteran of World War II, serving in India and China. His brother was in the Battle of the Bulge. I guess you had to live through those times to fully appreciate the great sacrifice we all experienced, none more so than those who served overseas.

Thank you, Mr. Gibbons, for your service then and later in Congress where you heeded the words of your grandmother to "keep ever mindful of the needs of others." You will be sorely missed.

Joyce Van Denburgh Doty, Orlando

Don't reduce court issues to 'us vs. them' Oct. 9, commentary

War on intelligence

Dean Cannon chastises the Times for alleged finger-pointing, yet doesn't mind thrusting a big one himself at "the self-selected intellectual 1 percent" who he says has recast politics as a morality play. This is a stunning admission that what I had hoped was merely a paranoid fantasy is actually true — Florida Republicans really do hate smart people.

Further, I would suggest to Cannon that, in an age when we have lobbyists writing our legislation for us, a little more intelligence in our elected officials might not be such a bad thing.

Alvin G. Wood, St. Petersburg

Big Bird in campaign spotlight | Oct. 10

Show us the math

The amount of federal funding that PBS receives is the same amount that it takes to run the Pentagon — for six hours.

Mitt Romney says he won't borrow money from China to pay for anything, but he still hasn't said how he plans to pay for the additional $2 trillion in military spending.

Show us the math, Mitt, before you cut educational TV for children. We need smarter children more than we need all the warships you want to build.

Jane Gibbons, Tampa

Long ballots could mean long waits | Oct. 11

Constitutional confusion

The dozen amendments that will appear on the Nov. 6 ballot will likely cause delays and confusion at the polls. They also offer the worse possibility of becoming law and being inscribed into our state Constitution.

All of these amendments are pet projects of legislators, issues that should be the subject of legislation and debate. Instead, they have drafted amendments to the Constitution, a presumably solemn and important document. The wording and titles of the proposed amendments will not provide much help to voters, and many offer comforting or enticing language about more freedom and fewer taxes.

All of these amendments are flawed and should be voted down.

Susan Greenbaum, Temple Terrace

Taliban shoots activist teen | Oct. 10

No boundary on barbarism

We look at the barbaric attack on Malala Yousafzai in Pakistan and wonder how anyone could interpret God's words in such a way. I suspect many Americans would ascribe the act to "Muslim" ideology. However, I would like to point out that a Republican candidate for the Arkansas state legislature, Charlie Fuqua, has proposed the death penalty for "unruly" children. He quotes Christian biblical verses in support.

He doesn't specify what unruly means, so I guess they will make it up as they go along. Maybe girls wanting to go to school would qualify.

What most concerns me is that Fuqua is receiving financial support from the Arkansas GOP as well as two sitting U.S. representatives from that state. It just shows that ignorance knows no geographical or religious boundaries.

Peter S. Cohoon, Tampa

Citizens delays $350M loan | Oct. 10

Profitable after all

Citizens Property Insurance Corp. has enough to loan $350 million? How about cutting back on what they charge policyholders instead? I had no idea they were so affluent. I thought they were the poor, struggling insurer of last resort that had to be subsidized.

I guess there are profits to be made in insurance in Florida after all. USAA just told me on the phone that due to the risk of being in Florida they can only insure one house here for us. They must not know how well Citizens is doing.

Doris Taylor, Brooksville

Big bang, evolution? From 'pit of hell' | Oct. 7

Eternal verities

I find it refreshing to hear a representative of our federal government who is willing and unashamed to say that the Bible is absolute. The founders of our country certainly thought so, so much so that it became the foundation of our established government. It's not thinking, as a letter writer asserted, "straight out of the Dark Ages." It's truth for all ages.

Gina Gardner, Tampa

Yes on high court justices | Oct. 11, Times recommends

I trust the justices

I have not always agreed with the decisions made by our state Supreme Court, but when the court is being hijacked by our politicians, I say, "Enough." No Supreme Court justice should be subjected to the vitriolic attacks of politicians who are dissatisfied with a couple of decisions.

I trust our Supreme Court justices much more than 90 percent of our politicians, who only want to be re-elected so that they can continue to receive money from lobbyists.

Richard White, New Port Richey

Political ads air, true or false | Oct. 7

Gatekeeping duty

There is something about the media not wanting to act as gatekeepers for political ads that doesn't resonate.

By their very nature, the hard news departments of these publications and stations function as gatekeepers. Reporters have to decide which facts to include, and editors have to determine which stories appear, and where. So why can't the business side that controls advertising content do the same?

Larry Silver, Oldsmar

Saturday's letters: Obama's foreign policy has been disastrous 10/12/12 [Last modified: Friday, October 12, 2012 4:32pm]

    

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