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Letters to the Editor

Thursday's letters: Postal Service should be priority

Mailboxes to have that empty feeling | Feb. 7, editorial

Postal Service should be priority

I have had enough of our government's shameful postal policy. The latest measure is to stop Saturday mail delivery.

Our government has a twisted sense of fairness. It will spend billions on foreign aid, give away billions to countries to beef up their armies, provide billions in benefits to illegals while, at the same time, cutting postal service that all Americans use. The U.S. Postal Service covers every nook and cranny throughout the United States, whether it is a remote rural area, a large city or an island delivery by boat. U.S. Postal Service employees work hard to provide great service at a very reasonable price. If our government needs to subsidize the post office, so what?

With email, texting and other means of quick communications, the post office is fighting an uphill battle to stay profitable. Our government wastes money each year with lost military equipment, welfare fraud, funding pet projects and keeping politicians happy with pork-barrel legislation instead of supporting our post offices and workers to maintain full service. Our priorities are going in the wrong direction. We must stop this nonsense by writing our congressmen with a loud message to save our post offices and the people who serve us.

Roger T. Abraham, Tampa

Pope: I must resign | Feb. 12

A voice of conscience

When Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger became Pope Benedict XVI, we all knew that his papacy would not last as long as some predecessors. So his resignation should not be a complete surprise, and we ought to praise God for the eight years that Pope Benedict has been able to serve and lead the Catholic Church.

Still, even though I am not Catholic, I was saddened to read of his resignation. As a cardinal, and then as pope, he has been a tireless advocate for the true values of Christianity — values that are sadly being lost, and attacked, all over the world.

Benedict is one of the few voices that have had the courage to speak out for true Christ-like discipleship and for traditional family values. With his resignation, we are losing a voice of conscience that we can ill afford to lose.

I am going to miss Benedict very much and will have him in my prayers.

Johann Christoph Arnold, senior pastor, Bruderhof Communities, Rifton, N.Y.

FDA may tighten up hydrocodone limits Feb. 9

Proposal increases costs

The FDA proposal to tighten restrictions on hydrocodone is going to have a major financial impact on seniors who need this drug for chronic pain. We will now be required to visit our primary care physician on a monthly basis and pay an insurance co-pay for the visit just to pick up a prescription. In turn, the doctor will bill Medicare for the visit. This will increase out-of-pocket expenses for those on fixed incomes and increase the cost of Medicare.

It is the responsibility of doctors to monitor their patients' usage, and pharmacies should monitor doctor-shopping. Why is the onus, once again, being placed on seniors and those with disabilities for additional costs?

Please contact your legislative representatives to stop the madness.

Mike Mills, Spring Hill

No crying in baseball | Feb. 7, letter

Respect the taxpayers

I agree with the letter writer's comment that the protracted debate over the Tampa Bay Rays' ownership seeking a new baseball stadium is a "major fiasco" in our community. I couldn't agree more with his suggestion that the Rays pay off the current stadium lease and then they can build a new stadium with their own money.

I am tired of sports entertainment owners continuing to take advantage of taxpayers for their own self-interest.

William Moutsatsos, Tampa

Obama weighs more policy by executive order | Feb. 11

Monarchical intent

Since the election it seems that President Barack Obama has decided he has unlimited powers to make laws and will do so by executive orders, completely ignoring the Constitution and Congress. It appears that he now considers himself a monarch and can do anything he pleases without any regard for the other two branches of government. I thought we had a democracy, not a dictatorship. Congress needs to put a stop to Obama's arrogance.

Dayle Stevens, Largo

Springs' issues lack priority | Feb. 11

Water should be priority

There are three essentials to sustain life: our air, food and water. Therefore any danger to these essentials should not be a question of money and should receive priority.

Our legislators feel there is no urgency to address the ongoing pollution of Florida's springs. These legislators won't be around when the point of no return comes and the springs become so polluted that it will be impossible to restore them. As the springs are a major tourist attraction and supply our everyday drinking water, how can they ignore this issue? The Legislature must act now and not allow money or big business to stand in the way. The future of Florida depends on it.

Jack Burlakos, Kenneth City

Rubio adopts skeptical stance on global warming science | Feb. 11

In denial on the facts

Like a child who covers his ears with his hands and shouts nonsense to prevent hearing something he does not want to hear, Sen. Marco Rubio wants to deny the facts that tell us that the actions of mankind have made the world's environment worse than it would have been.

He asserts there is "reasonable debate" on the issue, presumably from some scientists. No issue will be seen in exactly the same way by 100 percent of scientists. But how large a percentage of scientists reject the fundamentals of the case for our contributions to the environment's woes and possibilities of making changes for the better? I suspect that percentage is very low.

Have Rubio and others who want to deny mankind's role in the environment thought about how they will be evaluated when future generations live with rising seas, longer droughts and more massive storms? Rubio says he worries about the burdens on future generations caused by debt. Can future generations afford for people like Rubio to be wrong and to pay the environmental debt created by them?

Rod Palmateer, Clearwater

Thursday's letters: Postal Service should be priority 02/13/13 Thursday's letters: Postal Service should be priority 02/13/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 8:03pm]

    

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Letters to the Editor

Thursday's letters: Postal Service should be priority

Mailboxes to have that empty feeling | Feb. 7, editorial

Postal Service should be priority

I have had enough of our government's shameful postal policy. The latest measure is to stop Saturday mail delivery.

Our government has a twisted sense of fairness. It will spend billions on foreign aid, give away billions to countries to beef up their armies, provide billions in benefits to illegals while, at the same time, cutting postal service that all Americans use. The U.S. Postal Service covers every nook and cranny throughout the United States, whether it is a remote rural area, a large city or an island delivery by boat. U.S. Postal Service employees work hard to provide great service at a very reasonable price. If our government needs to subsidize the post office, so what?

With email, texting and other means of quick communications, the post office is fighting an uphill battle to stay profitable. Our government wastes money each year with lost military equipment, welfare fraud, funding pet projects and keeping politicians happy with pork-barrel legislation instead of supporting our post offices and workers to maintain full service. Our priorities are going in the wrong direction. We must stop this nonsense by writing our congressmen with a loud message to save our post offices and the people who serve us.

Roger T. Abraham, Tampa

Pope: I must resign | Feb. 12

A voice of conscience

When Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger became Pope Benedict XVI, we all knew that his papacy would not last as long as some predecessors. So his resignation should not be a complete surprise, and we ought to praise God for the eight years that Pope Benedict has been able to serve and lead the Catholic Church.

Still, even though I am not Catholic, I was saddened to read of his resignation. As a cardinal, and then as pope, he has been a tireless advocate for the true values of Christianity — values that are sadly being lost, and attacked, all over the world.

Benedict is one of the few voices that have had the courage to speak out for true Christ-like discipleship and for traditional family values. With his resignation, we are losing a voice of conscience that we can ill afford to lose.

I am going to miss Benedict very much and will have him in my prayers.

Johann Christoph Arnold, senior pastor, Bruderhof Communities, Rifton, N.Y.

FDA may tighten up hydrocodone limits Feb. 9

Proposal increases costs

The FDA proposal to tighten restrictions on hydrocodone is going to have a major financial impact on seniors who need this drug for chronic pain. We will now be required to visit our primary care physician on a monthly basis and pay an insurance co-pay for the visit just to pick up a prescription. In turn, the doctor will bill Medicare for the visit. This will increase out-of-pocket expenses for those on fixed incomes and increase the cost of Medicare.

It is the responsibility of doctors to monitor their patients' usage, and pharmacies should monitor doctor-shopping. Why is the onus, once again, being placed on seniors and those with disabilities for additional costs?

Please contact your legislative representatives to stop the madness.

Mike Mills, Spring Hill

No crying in baseball | Feb. 7, letter

Respect the taxpayers

I agree with the letter writer's comment that the protracted debate over the Tampa Bay Rays' ownership seeking a new baseball stadium is a "major fiasco" in our community. I couldn't agree more with his suggestion that the Rays pay off the current stadium lease and then they can build a new stadium with their own money.

I am tired of sports entertainment owners continuing to take advantage of taxpayers for their own self-interest.

William Moutsatsos, Tampa

Obama weighs more policy by executive order | Feb. 11

Monarchical intent

Since the election it seems that President Barack Obama has decided he has unlimited powers to make laws and will do so by executive orders, completely ignoring the Constitution and Congress. It appears that he now considers himself a monarch and can do anything he pleases without any regard for the other two branches of government. I thought we had a democracy, not a dictatorship. Congress needs to put a stop to Obama's arrogance.

Dayle Stevens, Largo

Springs' issues lack priority | Feb. 11

Water should be priority

There are three essentials to sustain life: our air, food and water. Therefore any danger to these essentials should not be a question of money and should receive priority.

Our legislators feel there is no urgency to address the ongoing pollution of Florida's springs. These legislators won't be around when the point of no return comes and the springs become so polluted that it will be impossible to restore them. As the springs are a major tourist attraction and supply our everyday drinking water, how can they ignore this issue? The Legislature must act now and not allow money or big business to stand in the way. The future of Florida depends on it.

Jack Burlakos, Kenneth City

Rubio adopts skeptical stance on global warming science | Feb. 11

In denial on the facts

Like a child who covers his ears with his hands and shouts nonsense to prevent hearing something he does not want to hear, Sen. Marco Rubio wants to deny the facts that tell us that the actions of mankind have made the world's environment worse than it would have been.

He asserts there is "reasonable debate" on the issue, presumably from some scientists. No issue will be seen in exactly the same way by 100 percent of scientists. But how large a percentage of scientists reject the fundamentals of the case for our contributions to the environment's woes and possibilities of making changes for the better? I suspect that percentage is very low.

Have Rubio and others who want to deny mankind's role in the environment thought about how they will be evaluated when future generations live with rising seas, longer droughts and more massive storms? Rubio says he worries about the burdens on future generations caused by debt. Can future generations afford for people like Rubio to be wrong and to pay the environmental debt created by them?

Rod Palmateer, Clearwater

Thursday's letters: Postal Service should be priority 02/13/13 Thursday's letters: Postal Service should be priority 02/13/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 8:03pm]

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

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