Tuesday, November 21, 2017
Letters To The Editor

Monday's letters: Trump right to end DACA

RECOMMENDED READING


DACA's end confirmed | Sept. 6

Trump was right

to end program

I would love for anyone to explain why this country cannot protect itself from foreign citizens breaking and entering into our country. The United States is my home. I don't open my door to strangers and I certainly don't set them up in a room within my home, pay for their needs and then extend that to their children.

The issue of immigration and the so-called Dreamers really isn't complicated. Their parents committed a crime. According to our laws and common sense, a criminal's family can't take control of the loot and simply by virtue of being there, keep it. This is the legacy of the Dreamers. They are the recipients of the loot and since we have let them believe it's theirs by virtue of our silence in past years, they think they own it.

It has nothing to do with "hopes and dreams" — our children have plenty of those and plenty of our children will be forgoing those same dreams because they can't afford higher education. Their futures will be tenuous because cheap labor is making wages so depressed.

These arrivals thought the gravy train would never end, but nothing lasts forever, especially if its inception was a criminal offense. President Donald Trump is right to put a stop to this theft of our own future and I support him. It should have happened long ago.

Sandra Kellstrom, Pinellas Park

American politics

Breaking the parties' grip

There's no way to eliminate political parties because people will always congregate with those who are like-minded. But we can take steps to provide a strong base for processes that better reflect the will of the people.

From the House of Representatives to state and local offices, the states can revise the nominating methods for state and local offices so that in a first ballot anyone who reasonably qualifies can be included. With the top two vote-getters being selected for a runoff, independent candidates and others who are not beholden to political parties have a chance to serve. Several states already do this. Once this happens, arguably, gerrymandering will gradually be defeated.

In the House of Representatives and Senate, the minority member of each committee should have the same power as the majority leader to introduce bills and have them voted on.

In both houses, staff members, who probably know more about a given subject that their elected bosses, should be selected by merit from a pool of candidates — a lottery system without political prejudice — whereby each would serve both Republicans and Democrats.

What will it take for people already in office to implement these changes? How many more years of gridlock are needed before we realize that our democracy is at risk? The solutions to our problems — wealth inequality, immigration, education, climate change, health care, the national debt and more — are subsumed by the one-upmanship inherent in the political parties. It's past time to break up the political concrete that corrupts our better angels and get on with governing — solving problems.

Mike Rosenthal, Clearwater

Comments

Wednesday’s letters: Breaking down health data

Don’t let news on blood pressure raise yours | Nov. 17, commentaryBreaking down health numbersThank you for publishing the timely commentary by Dr. H. Gilbert Welch on blood pressure. The point he makes about relative risks versus absolute risks ...
Updated: 5 hours ago

Tuesday’s letters: Disgraceful tax proposals

Tax billDisgraceful, harmful proposalsThe very fact that the Congress of the people of the United States would propose, not to mention pass, the current tax bill is nothing short of disgraceful. What sort of representatives of the people support cutt...
Published: 11/20/17

Monday’s letters: Doctors should speak up on harassment

Sexual harassmentDoctors need to speak upThe recent widespread recognition, followed by disapproval, of sexual harassment across many workplaces signals a paradigm shift in social attitudes toward abuse of power that is long overdue.The male-dominate...
Published: 11/17/17

Saturday’s letters: Reservoir project off to a good start

Lake OkeechobeeReservoir project off to good startThis year, more than 70,000 Floridians contacted their legislators to support expediting a reservoir project south of Lake Okeechobee. Another 150 business people, anglers, health care professionals a...
Published: 11/15/17
Updated: 11/17/17

Sunday’s letters: Roundabout way to help the rich

Senate GOP’s tax plan to kill ACA mandate | Nov. 15Devious way to hurt middle classSo, let’s see if we have this straight. The proposed amendment to the Senate tax plan, to kill the individual mandate, will cause young people to not buy health in...
Published: 11/15/17
Updated: 11/17/17

Friday’s letters: Stop laying blame on teachers

Hillsborough teachers are set to protest | Nov. 14Stop laying blame on teachersI am a veteran teacher, coming up on 30 years of service to public education. My mother was also an educator, clocking over 40 years of service in public education. Sh...
Published: 11/15/17
Updated: 11/16/17

Pasco Letters to the Editor for Nov. 17

Questioning fees draws snarky responseYou are probably aware of the new Pasco utility fees that became effective last month.Under the dubious title of "convenience fee" for making utility payments by credit card or e-check, Pasco Utilities adds $2.75...
Published: 11/15/17

Dollars need to stay at home if south Brooksville is to survive

As a member of the Moton High School Class of 1967, I grew up a poor but very happy child because of the love given to me by all. So all I had to do was be a child and not rush to be an adult.There were many black businesses along a four-block area o...
Updated: 11 hours ago

Wednesday’s letters: Generosity makes all the difference

National Adoption MonthThe difference generosity makesAs a football coach, I always had to be ready to overcome unexpected challenges. With injuries, crowd noise and especially weather, the game plan is always adjusting to overcome adversity.Our stat...
Published: 11/13/17
Updated: 11/14/17

Monday’s letters: Moore is not fit for public office

Woman: Candidate pursued her as a teen | Nov. 10Moore is not fit for public officeIt is sad that Roy Moore, a self-professed religious man, is running for a Senate seat when he is clearly unfit for any job involving the public for so many reasons...
Published: 11/10/17
Updated: 11/13/17