Clear85° WeatherClear85° Weather

Columns, Perspective

  1. Editorial: Voters opt for the sensible center

    Columns

    Tampa Bay voters rejected some of the worst negative campaign attacks and generally moved toward the center Tuesday in primary elections with typically light turnouts. There were few close races, and judicial candidates who raised the most money did not always win. Incumbent school board members in Pinellas and …

  2. Column: America, the can't-do nation

    Columns

    More and more I'm convinced that America right now isn't a country dealing with a mere dip in its mood and might. It's a country surrendering to a new identity and era, in which optimism is quaint and the frontier anything but endless.

    Omayra Hernadez protests outside the South Florida offices of Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart, R-Fla., and Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.
  3. Column: Social segregation

    Columns

    "All my black friends have a bunch of white friends. And all my white friends have one black friend."

  4. Conference calls: Breaking the code of silence

    Columns

    Everything you have always suspected about conference calls is true. The Harvard Business Review has a survey to prove it.

    Thinkstock
  5. Column: Dash of salt not bad; extremes are the enemy

    Columns

    For years, we have known that diets high in salt can be bad for people with high blood pressure. A study published recently in the New England Journal of Medicine confirmed this fact. It monitored more than 100,000 people in 18 countries and found that people who consumed more sodium generally had significantly …

  6. Column: Black America and the burden of the perfect victim

    Columns

    An information war is being waged in Ferguson, Mo., each salvo meant to shape public perceptions of Michael Brown and Darren Wilson.

    A woman rises to her feet during funeral services for Michael Brown on Monday at Friendly Temple Missionary Baptist Church in St. Louis. Brown, 18, was shot to death Aug. 9.
  7. Column: Club Med for terrorists

    Columns

    UNITED NATIONS

    The hostilities in the Gaza Strip between Israel and Hamas persist and the diplomatic war at the United Nations continues, also without resolution. While there is no shortage of opinions on the way forward, the most obvious solution is strikingly absent — the need to disarm and isolate Hamas, …

    The emir of Qatar, left, Sheikh Hamad bin Khalifa al-Thani, greets residents in Gaza City in 2012 as he arrives for a ceremony at a Qatar-funded rehab center. Qatar is a haven for leading Islamic radicals.
  8. Column: James Foley's last message to his family

    Columns

    Editor's note: All letters that James Foley wrote during his captivity were confiscated by the Islamic State terrorists who held him. So he devised what his family called a "better approach." He asked a fellow hostage to memorize what he had to say. In June, months before her son's grisly murder by an extremist, Diane …

    During his captivity, American journalist James Foley, whose killing was confirmed last week, asked a fellow hostage to memorize what he had to say. The message got out.
  9. To all my catcallers: I owe you an apology

    Columns

    New York Post writer Doree Lewak has graced us with a piece on the totally flattering practice of men catcalling women. In a column last week, Lewak chastised feminists for cruelly denouncing the arduous efforts of catcallers — those beautiful men with their grunts and their hoots — and credits …

  10. Ruth: Parents pay any price, bear any burden

    Columns

    There are some facts and figures in life we probably don't really need to know: like when we're going to die, or how long the brother-in-law intends to stay at the house, or perhaps the final tally for the remodeled bathroom that began as a sink installation and wound up resembling one of Saddam Hussein's palace …

    $230,610 to raise Skippy?
That sounds awfully low.
  11. James: On campus, women must practice safety (w/video)

    Columns

    It was on an evening in the dormitory, days before classes started in my junior year, that I came closest to being sexually assaulted. A handsome, charming member of the golf team, out prowling the near-empty campus with a friend, struck up a conversation with me and my dormmate.

  12. Column: Protesters in Ferguson should rebrand themselves as 'sidewalk counselors'

    Columns

    Dozens of legitimate protesters have been arrested in Ferguson, Mo., for essentially doing it wrong, which can be variously described as protesting about issues of race, refusing to stop protesting about issues of race, and in many cases, perhaps most outrageously, protesting while black.

    … like antiabortion activist Eleanor McCullen, who was part of the Supreme Court case that struck down protest buffer zones.
  13. Perspective: Form Ferguson to Seattle, how to serve and protect (w/video)

    Perspective

    The events this month in Ferguson, Mo., ought to be of grave concern to anyone who believes in the First Amendment, and specifically the rights to free speech, protest and assembly.

    When protesters demonstrated against the World Trade Organization in Seattle in 1999, police chief Norm Stamper said:  “We gassed fellow Americans engaging in civil disobedience.We set a number of precedents, most of them bad. And police departments across the country learned all the wrong lessons from us.”
  14. Five things to watch in Tuesday's primary

    Perspective

    Tuesday's statewide primary election may feel like a warmup act for the main event: a November showdown between Republican Gov. Rick Scott and his leading Democratic challenger, Charlie Crist. But even if turnout is as low as expected, important trends will hint at where things are heading for the general …

    Florida gubernatorial candidate Charlie Crist should deliver a decisive victory over former state Sen. Nan Rich.
  15. The reading file: Charting the racial divide and meeting the neighbors

    Columns

    Charting the racial divide

    With events in Ferguson, Mo., once again exposing racial fault lines in America, here are some good background resources that rely on hard data. A summary of "The Real Record on Racial Attitudes" — based on decades of responses to the General Social Survey run by the …

  16. Perspective: How geckos stick and unstick their feet

    Perspective

    Your Benjamin goes furthest in Mississippi

    Bjorn Christian Torrissen
  17. Ruth: Appalling 'joke' merited stronger response

    Columns

    On the off-chance they might have missed this minor detail over at the city of St. Petersburg's Stormwater, Pavement and Traffic Operations Department: We are currently residing in the year 2014, not 1861.

  18. Perspective: Pressuring for a Washington Redskins name change (w/video)

    Perspective

    WASHINGTON

    He showed up at the bar for a birthday party, but J.C. Rocha was huddled near the big-screen TV in the corner. It was inevitable. When the Redskins are on, football rivals the city's obsession with politics.

    Groundskeepers prepare the end zone for an NFL football preseason game between the Washington Redskins and the New England Patriots in Landover, Md. The debate over the Washington Redskins nickname has been around for decades, usually as a flash-in-the-pan topic that pops up occasionally and disappears after a day or so. This time is different. The campaign against the term many consider to be a racial slur has reached sustained, unprecedented momentum over the last 18 months and shows no signs of abating.
  19. Meet the man who saved JFK after the PT-109 sinking

    Perspective

    On a moonless night in summer 1943, a Japanese destroyer tore through a U.S. Navy patrol-torpedo boat guarding the waters around the Solomon Islands. The boat was PT-109, skippered by a young lieutenant from Massachusetts named John F. Kennedy.

    Eroni Kumana, believed to be 93, died this month. He was barely out of his teens when he rescued Kennedy’s crew after PT-109 was sliced in half.
  20. Column: Ice bucket fad leaves other needs in the cold

    Columns

    Americans are probably not unique in treating philanthropy as a sort of game, with the goal of making it go down painlessly.