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Search results for "obituaries"

  1. FSU, Miami named favorites to win ACC divisions

    College

    GREENSBORO, N.C. — Florida State was an obvious choice as a favorite in one of the ACC's divisions. In the other, the pecking order was nowhere near that clear. Miami was the pick to win the cluttered Coastal Division despite receiving fewer first-place votes than two other teams. …

  2. James Garner, who reluctantly found fame on 'Maverick' and 'The Rockford Files', dies at 86

    The Feed

    James Garner, one of the first stars to find success in both TV and movies, died of natural causes at his Los Angeles home on Saturday. He was 86. You might know Garner from TV's Maverick, or The Rockford Files in the '70s. The Feed's Sean Daly, a Rockford Files fanatic, writes: …

  3. Did you read what Andy Meacham wrote about Dallas Laverne Bohrer in yesterday's paper?

    State

    If you didn't, here: GULFPORT — The celebrants trekked in a half-hour before sunset. Some carried coolers; a few had bug spray. …

  4. Yanks' Tanaka injures elbow

    Sports

    CLEVELAND — The Yankees' battered rotation may have suffered the most crucial loss of all. Rookie sensation Masahiro Tanaka, who is second in the AL with a 2.51 ERA, went on the 15-day disabled list with right elbow inflammation. He had an MRI exam in New York on Tuesday.  …

  5. Yankees acquire D'backs' McCarthy for ailing rotation

    Ml

    ATLANTA — The Yankees acquired help for their depleted rotation Sunday by trading for veteran RHP Brandon McCarthy from the Diamondbacks. Arizona is also sending New York cash in Sunday's deal for LHP Vidal Nuno.  …

  6. Tony Gwynn and the story he never got to read

    The Heater

    I learned of Tony Gwynn's death, by coincidence, while on a trip to San Diego. …

  7. Obituaries also draw on life experience of the writer

    Perspective

    The extinguished torch. The anchor with a broken chain; the black-bordered condolence note or funeral invitation: just a few of the myriad ways we have marked death over time. They are all symbols trying to get at something. …

  8. A ghoulish job? Maybe, but obit writer's true task is to acknowledge a life

    Human Interest

    The week before I started the job, I sat at the kitchen table with my grandpa. I explained what I'd be doing, the best I could. Truthfully, I wasn't totally sure. Dead people. Obituaries.  …

  9. For decades, he chronicled the lives of others

    Obituaries

    ST. PETERSBURG — Craig Basse spent decades writing obituaries in the pages of the St. Petersburg Times. Civil rights leaders and celebrities. Jewelers, politicians and teachers. Saxophonists, philanthropists and librarians. He compressed their accomplishments into deft, newsy clauses. …

  10. Increasingly, pets pop up in obituaries, wills

    Pets

    When Anna Ruth Jones died in Durham, N.C., this month, her obituary listed a handful of cousins and special friends. But the most prominent survivor, the only one described as "cherished," was Sir Rufus of Iredell, her black and white cat. …

  11. Kids' dispute makes obit of mom, Josie Anello of Land O'Lakes, famous on Internet

    News

    LAND O'LAKES — Her sweetly smiling face appeared Feb. 14 in the obituaries of a local newspaper. …

  12. 1978 Pasco Times obituary may help settle estate in Germany

    Columns

    The front page of the April 26, 1978, Pasco Times is dominated by Dick Kelton's firing. And you thought John Gallagher had always been county administrator. …

  13. Times staff writer Andrew Meacham honored for his obituary writing

    News

    The Society of Professional Obituary Writers has awarded two prizes to St. Petersburg Times staff writer Andrew Meacham, who authors the newspaper's Epilogue feature. …

  14. Onward and upward, then finally downward

    Columns

    I enjoy a well-crafted obituary as much as the next man, and now that people of my own generation (what????) are appearing there, the obituary page becomes closer and closer to my heart. …

  15. Obit writer lived at top speed, did not fear death

    Obituaries

    ST. PETERSBURG — If the pain of the hundreds of grieving families she interviewed ever rubbed off on Romaine Kosharsky, she never showed it. …

  16. Obituaries in the news

    C. Harmon Brown, 78, a pioneer in sports science and medicine who advocated for female athletes, died Tuesday (Nov. 11, 2008) of cancer. Mr. Brown was a member of the medical and antidoping commission of the International Association of Athletics Federations.  …

  17. Obituaries

    Obituaries

    Chris Haney, 59, a former Canadian journalist whose fascination with entertaining, barely useful tidbits of information led him to co-create the bestselling board game Trivial Pursuit, died Monday (May 31, 2010) in Toronto. He had been in poor health the past two years with kidney and circulatory problems, said Scott Abbott, who created the game with Haney more than 30 years ago. Before data hounds had Google, there was Trivial Pursuit, a board game that elevated the acquisition of a wide range of arcane knowledge to a coveted social skill. …

  18. Nation/world obituaries

    News

    Nora Kovach, a fiery Hungarian ballerina who caused a sensation in 1953 with Istvan Rabovsky, her ballet partner and first husband, when they became the first highly publicized dance defectors to the West from the Soviet bloc, died Jan. 18 in Miami. She was 77 and lived in Bal Harbour and Manhattan. Kovach and Rabovsky, as they were billed in the United States, electrified audiences with the spectacular athletic bravura of their Soviet training. …

  19. Obituaries: Pultizer Prize winner Jack Nelson, "popular culture" pioneer Ray Browne and noted biochemist Mildred Cohn

    Jack Nelson, 80, a Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative reporter for the Los Angeles Times who covered the civil rights movement in the South during the 1950s and 1960s, the Watergate scandal in the 1970s and national politics until 2001, died of pancreatic cancer Wednesday at his home in Bethesda, Md. …

  20. World obituaries

    Horton Foote, 92, whose bittersweet stories of heartbreak and regret set in small Southern towns earned him wide popular acclaim as well as two Academy Awards and a Pulitzer Prize, died Wednesday (March 4, 2009) in Hartford, Conn. Mr. Foote's writing career spanned seven decades and encompassed film, theater and television. He emerged on the national scene in 1962 when he won an Academy Award for his screen adaptation of To Kill a Mockingbird, based on Harper Lee's novel. He won a second Oscar for his original screenplay Tender Mercies in 1983, a low-budget film that starred Robert Duvall, who won a best actor Oscar. Mr. Foote was a contender for a third Oscar in 1986 with The Trip to Bountiful. The screenplay did not win but Geraldine Page won a best actress award. After 50 years as a successful playwright, Mr. Foote received the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1995 with The Young Man From Atlanta. He wrote at least 60 plays, 14 movie scripts and 14 teleplays. Last fall, his play Dividing the Estate opened to rave reviews on Broadway. He based many of his plays on stories his parents told him when he was growing up in Wharton, Texas. …

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