Make us your home page
Instagram

Get the quickest, smartest news, analysis and photos from the Bucs game emailed to you shortly after the final whistle.

(View our Privacy Policy)

A legacy of prosperity tarnished by doping, scandal

Juan Antonio Samaranch, the longtime president of the International Olympic Committee who led the Olympic movement out of turmoil to unprecedented influence and prosperity, only to see his legacy tarnished by the specter of sports doping and a corruption scandal, died Tuesday in Barcelona. He was 89.

Mr. Samaranch, a Spaniard who served as IOC president from 1980 to 2001, had been in failing health since he collapsed one day after the last of his four terms ended, in July 2001.

Mr. Samaranch possessed a keen sense of politics and diplomacy and a fanatic devotion to the possibilities of the Olympic movement. Under his watch, even as the Games became a global TV phenomenon, he sought to push the peace process along in such diverse places as the Balkans and the Korean peninsula.

For all his political and diplomatic successes, however, he was never able — critics say he wasn't willing — to eradicate the use of performance-enhancing drugs among Olympians. And a corruption scandal erupted amid revelations that bidders in Salt Lake City had showered IOC members with more than $1 million in cash and gifts in a winning campaign to land the 2002 Winter Games.

"He took over the Olympics at a time of bankruptcy and led perhaps the most important turnaround of all time," said former IOC marketing director Michael Payne.

During his term, the IOC also awarded a series of lucrative U.S. TV rights contracts, including two groundbreaking deals worth $3.5 billion with NBC for five Olympics from 2000 to 2008 — agreements that Samaranch and Pound negotiated in secret.

"I cannot find the words to express the distress of the Olympic family," said Jacques Rogge, who succeeded Samaranch as president.

A legacy of prosperity tarnished by doping, scandal 04/21/10 [Last modified: Wednesday, April 21, 2010 11:11pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Cubs down Dodgers 3-2; force NLCS Game 5 Thursday

    Ml

    CHICAGO — Javier Baez snapped an 0-for-20 skid with two home runs, former Ray Wade Davis hung on for a six-out save and the Cubs avoided a sweep, holding off the Dodgers 3-2 Wednesday night in Game 4 of the NL Championship Series.

  2. Bucs' Vernon Hargreaves: 'I'm not making any plays'

    Bucs

    TAMPA — Eli Manning gathered his receivers together on the sideline during the Giants' Week 4 game against the Bucs and told them he planned to target the weakest link of the secondary all afternoon.

    Patriots receiver Chris Hogan gets position in front of Bucs cornerback Vernon Hargreaves for a 5-yard touchdown pass in New England’s win on Oct. 5.
  3. Lightning's J.T. Brown to stop anthem protest, focus on community involvement

    Lightning Strikes

    COLUMBUS, Ohio — Lightning wing J.T. Brown will no longer raise his first as a protest during the national anthem before games.

    J.T. Brown says he will work more with the Tampa police and groups that serve at-risk young people.
  4. Signs point to Jameis Winston dressing vs. Bills

    Sports

    TAMPA — The Bucs didn't sign another quarterback Wednesday, which would suggest they are confident that Jameis Winston can be active as a backup to Ryan Fitzpatrick on Sunday at Buffalo if he doesn't start.

  5. FSU doesn't feel need for ongoing reminder of last year's beatdown at Louisville

    Sports

    Of course Florida State remembers what happened against Louisville last year. The 63-20 loss was one of the worst defeats in Seminoles history.

    Louisville's Lamar Jackson looks back at the action from the sidelines during the first half of an NCAA college football game against Murray State, Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)