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Boys basketball, Class 6A, District 7: St. Petersburg contains Henson, still falters

TRINITY — Despite shutting down star John Henson, St. Petersburg fell 50-42 to Sickles in Saturday's Class 6A-7 final.

"Henson is good at what he does, but he didn't have to take over the game tonight and that is respect to Sickles," Green Devils coach Chris Blackwell said. "I am proud of my guys, we played well and they never got rattled."

Henson was held to just eight points, three blocks and five rebounds. The St. Petersburg zone defense shut down the big center, but allowed the Gryphons' supporting cast to step up.

"Teams come out with that type of game plan and luckily they decided to shut me off and let everyone else do their thing, that's what happened, and that's what ultimately got us the win," Henson said.

Stepping into scoring roles were Nico Cora and Rashawn Rembert, who had 12 and 13 points, respectively. Cora's comparable size to Henson and Rembert's accuracy outside created a lethal duo.

"I thought that Rembert came in and had a couple of big crucial shots," Blackwell said. "That really opened it up for them."

The Gryphons led by as many as 18 at one point and by as few as eight during the third quarter.

"It was probably towards the middle of the second quarter that I felt we gained control of the game and everything else just kind of fell in place," Henson said.

Anthony Carter led the Green Devils with 13 points. Carter was also responsible for manning up with Henson in the paint.

Sickles50
St. Petersburg42

Boys basketball, Class 6A, District 7: St. Petersburg contains Henson, still falters 02/14/09 [Last modified: Sunday, February 15, 2009 12:10am]
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