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Does Aaron Murray need a seeing-eye Bulldog?

ATHENS, Ga. — Aaron Murray is going blind!

Not really. But by the time social media gets done passing along this little story, that's where it may end up.

Murray, the Georgia quarterback and former Plant High star, was rubbing his eyes and looked tired Tuesday. So a reporter asked him: Did you just wake up?

"No, why?"

Because your eyes look …

"Oh, no. I'm wearing contacts so my eyes are a little glassy. I just started wearing contacts like a week ago."

So here come the follow-up questions. After all, the season opener at Clemson is Saturday.

"My eyes aren't that bad," he said. "It's just for class, it helps. … The words (on the board) are just easier to see."

Will he wear them in a game?

"No, I'm not used to them yet."

So exactly how many yards down field can you see? (laughter)

"Oh I see. No, it hasn't affected me at all. I see fine."

So for the record, you can see the safeties?

"Yes, I can see safeties. I can see colors. No excuses because of my eyes. It's just me being an idiot."

The topic had been closed until another reporter walked up late and asked, "So when did you start wearing contacts?"

Murray: "Oh no. Is this going to be a big deal?"

Yeah, probably.

Does Aaron Murray need a seeing-eye Bulldog? 08/28/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 8:34pm]
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