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Flow Yoga studio in Port Richey offers a hot style

Mick Hughes, right, supports Martin Butt as he stretches while doing yoga during Thursday night’s Hot Flow class.

BRENDAN FITTERER | Times

Mick Hughes, right, supports Martin Butt as he stretches while doing yoga during Thursday night’s Hot Flow class.

PORT RICHEY

There's no denying it. It's hot, hot, hot.

When Flow Yoga in Port Richey teaches its weekly hot yoga class at 6:30 p.m., instructor Faith Bevan, 56, raises the thermostat.

"Most people are usually pretty drenched (at the end of class)," Bevan said. "But it's not a stinky sweat, like a gym sweat. That's what's interesting and that's because its cleansing and detoxifying. There's just no smell, and they're soaked."

Typically, hot yoga has the temperature up to 105 degrees (however, Flow Yoga can only get the room up to 98 because of the building's limitations), then participants stretch, pose, hold — definitely sweat — for an hour and a half.

Yikes.

"There is some slipping and sliding some," Bevan said with a laugh. She adds many use a mat towel that is specific for hot yoga, "which gets sticky as it gets more wet, so no sliding." Bevan, who has been teaching yoga for 10 years, says hot yoga isn't for everyone, especially people that aren't adequately prepared for the temperature and the strain it can put on muscles and the body's core.

"Those who have MS (multiple sclerosis), heart disease, hypertension or even problems with temperature regulation, shouldn't do this," Bevan said. "Even people who are overly stiff, because they will not do well at all. Don't forget, people need to be very hydrated before and then hydrate well afterward."

Hot yoga is a variation of vinyasa flow yoga, which means to link together with purpose. But what the heat does is it makes the body more receptive to the positions throughout the class. And in the end, Bevan says, you look for inner peace, which when it comes, you'll want it to linger.

"Oh, you'll be thirsty at then end, but not hungry," Bevan said. "That's because you'll be cleansed. You come to one with your breath during it and you really feel different afterward. There's no way you can do it just once."

Classes are either $14 per session, or there is a monthly payment plan available. For more information, call (727) 848-7283 or log onto www.flowyoga.biz.

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Let us know and we may come document it. Tell us about an event, a game, a practice, an outing, a tournament — just about anything! There's a lot going on in the community and we want to know about it. Contact community sports editor Mike Camunas and tell him what's happening. Call (352) 544-1771 or e-mail him at [email protected] We live in this community, so let's talk to each other.

Flow Yoga studio in Port Richey offers a hot style 02/25/09 [Last modified: Wednesday, February 25, 2009 8:15pm]
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