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One Buc Place was hurricane shelter for Bucs long-snapper

As  Hurricane Irma approached, Garrison Sanborn decided the safest place to keep his family was at One Buc Place, where they stayed Sunday night as the storm passed. [AP photo]

As Hurricane Irma approached, Garrison Sanborn decided the safest place to keep his family was at One Buc Place, where they stayed Sunday night as the storm passed. [AP photo]

Bucs long-snapper Garrison Sanborn was born and raised in Tampa, but as Hurricane Irma approached, he decided the safest place to keep his family was at One Buc Place, where they stayed Sunday night as the storm passed.

"With the fear that the storm surge was going to be crazy, we just spent the night here in the facility," said Sanborn, who lives on Harbor Island. "I had my son set up in his little Pack 'n Play in the receivers room. We were all set up all over the place."

Sanborn's 7-month-old son Jameson was there in one meeting room, and his 7-year-old daughter Julianne in the linebackers room, while Sanborn and his wife Tara stayed in the defensive line room. He heard officials saying they didn't need to go far to find safe shelter, so he took the Bucs up on their offer.

"The Bucs were generous enough to let us to make sure we were safe here in the building," said Sanborn, who had been cut and re-signed the previous weekend in the team's final roster shuffling. "Being from here, you're used to the threat of it and you don't want to take it lightly."

Sanborn has dealt with Mother Nature impacting a football season before -- during his time in Buffalo, he got snowed in for five days in 2014, and a game against the Jets was relocated to Detroit. With almost no preparation, a motivated Buffalo team cruised to a 38-3 victory, and he hopes for the same result when the Bucs finally get to play their season opener Sunday against the Bears.

"We didn't practice at all before we played the Jets," he said. "We literally showed up to Detroit with one walkthrough. Everything else was done over the phone as far as game-planning from everybody's individual houses. Everybody was so fired up, so excited to actually hit somebody that it was probably the biggest win we ever had, the largest margin. I'm hoping that's going to be the same mindset that we'll have."

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One Buc Place was hurricane shelter for Bucs long-snapper 09/13/17 [Last modified: Wednesday, September 13, 2017 2:50pm]
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