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Time for Jerry Jones to hand GM reins to Stephen

According to a few members of the Arlington Police Department, the Dallas Cowboys have instructed them to prepare for a big event at AT&T Stadium the weekend of Sept. 17.

The "big event" is the eagerly awaited middleweight boxing match between Canelo Alvarez and Triple G (Gennady Golovkin). The fight could potentially draw more than 80,000 and be another notch in Jerry Jones' AT&T Stadium headboard that now includes a Super Bowl, NBA All-Star Game, Taylor Swift, NCAA Final Four, Beyoncé and WrestleMania.

While the general manager of the Dallas Cowboys is working the phones to secure the biggest boxing match in years, he and his family are busy finalizing the production/construction that will be The Star in Frisco; the team's practice facility will be yet another business "game changer" Jerry has introduced to the NFL.

The cruel irony is that, despite all of this increased business, notoriety and revenue Jerry has helped to create for North Texas and the Dallas Cowboys, none of it has helped to make his football team any better. The football portion of his team remains miles behind the business part. Now is as good a time as any to recuse himself as its general manager.

Make Jerry general manager emeritus and turn him loose to do what he does best: sell.

In a report on Bleacher Report, veteran NFL writer Mike Freeman quoted two anonymous NFL executives who said, "You could always count on Jerry Jones (bleeping) things up. That isn't happening any longer. That's a Super Bowl-caliber team now."

Since Jerry bought the Cowboys in 1989, he's had Stephen at his side to learn. It has been assumed that the formal transition of power from Jerry to Stephen will occur when either God or the 73-year-old Jerry decides it's time.

It's no secret Stephen has assumed an increased load of the football decisions of late. After more than 20 years of on-the-job training, which has included its share of good and bad, he is ready for the title.

This does not mean Stephen is a "Belichick." He's still a Jones. The apple does not fall far from the Jones tree of cash, but Stephen does not share his dad's comfort level with risk. Jerry grew comfortable with risk from an early age. Stephen was growing up after his dad had done quite well, so there was less of a need to take such monstrous swings.

In the past few years, the Cowboys have taken fewer and fewer giant risks. That is not a coincidence.

Stephen prefers to eschew high-priced free agents and the type of aging "names" that had previously been a narcotic to his dad. Stephen is all about young, "cheap" talent.

History will show that Jerry Jones is one of the best ever at the business of football, while the football part has eluded his grasp.

To counter the decades-old assertion that he is a substandard football GM, Jerry once famously asked, "Did you like those three Super Bowls?" on a local radio show. That was in 2001.

Jerry's record to land big events, build and execute expansion on the grandest of scales is unparalleled in football. His football record since those three Super Bowls stinks.

His son is not the salesman his dad is, but Stephen has acquired a superior football sense.

Whether it's The Star or Canelo vs. Triple G, the Cowboys don't need much more help when it comes to marketing. They just need help winning.

Fort Worth Star-Telegram (TNS)

Time for Jerry Jones to hand GM reins to Stephen 05/15/16 [Last modified: Sunday, May 15, 2016 4:36pm]
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