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Goal: Ban sexually violent athletes

INDIANAPOLIS — A woman who said she was raped by college football players nearly 20 years ago is asking the NCAA to ban sexually violent athletes.

Brenda Tracy and her son will present a petition to the NCAA's Board of Governors at its meeting today in Indianapolis. Current guidelines generally allow schools or conferences to hand down such punishments.

Tracy's son Darius says he started the petition after hearing about multiple sexual assault allegations involving Baylor football players. The petition contains more than 157,000 signatures.

It's unclear when — or if — the NCAA committee will take action. It has met once with the family as it debates how to address sexual violence on campus.

Brenda Tracy said she was raped by four men, including two Oregon State football players, in 1998.

The NCAA issued a statement that read in part: "She has a compelling story and, like us, is seeking changes on campuses and nationally to stem the tide of sexual assault. We look forward to continuing our conversation with her and other leaders regarding this important matter."

UNC DISPUTES NCAA: North Carolina disputed NCAA accusations that it lacked institutional control over its athletic department and challenged whether the NCAA has jurisdiction to impose penalties for violations resulting from an academic fraud scandal. UNC did not issue further self-imposed penalties in a public response to five violations formally issued by the NCAA in April. The Level I charges, the harshest the NCAA can levy, center on the African and Afro-American Studies program, which for 18 years gave high grades for little work and had significant enrollment among UNC athletes. The response acknowledged problems, but contended that they are subject to review by UNC's accrediting agency and not the NCAA.

MISSOURI PUNISHMENT: The NCAA accepted Missouri's self-imposed sanctions over infractions involving men's basketball, but it tacked on a year of probation through next August. The infractions committee panel's findings over what it said were roughly $11,400 in improper inducements and benefits given to players and a recruit by two boosters were released nearly seven months after Missouri admitted NCAA violations dating to 2011.

Goal: Ban sexually violent athletes 08/02/16 [Last modified: Tuesday, August 2, 2016 9:16pm]
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