Make us your home page
Instagram

Get the quickest, smartest news, analysis and photos from the Bucs game emailed to you shortly after the final whistle.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Stamkos, Lightning in injury routines

Steven Stamkos is at his Tampa home, rehabilitating and wearing an Aircast, a postsurgical walking boot filled with air.

DIRK SHADD | Times

Steven Stamkos is at his Tampa home, rehabilitating and wearing an Aircast, a postsurgical walking boot filled with air.

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Almost a week into Steven Stamkos' recovery from a broken right tibia, there are routines.

The Lightning center is at his Tampa home, rehabilitating and wearing an Aircast, a postsurgical walking boot filled with, well, air. "Standard procedure for him to be wearing that after the surgery that he had," head athletic trainer Tommy Mulligan said.

Coach Jon Cooper and his players also have overcome the shock and are focused on staying in playoff contention until Stamkos returns, though no official timetable has been announced.

Cooper reiterated Saturday that he believes Stamkos, who had a permanent titanium rod inserted in his leg Tuesday, will play again this season. "I don't think his season is over. I'm very confident it's not," Cooper said. "His career is not over, he's not been traded. He's a big part of us. You just have to weather the storm."

That seemed awfully difficult Monday, when Stamkos was hurt in a 3-0 loss to the Bruins.

"That Monday night, Jon Cooper held a pity party, 100 percent," Cooper said. "But when I woke up the next day, that was it. It was over. It's game on."

Part of that, Cooper said, is putting players "in the right situations. (Stamkos) affects things. He affects the (penalty kill), who goes out. Our power play is completely changed. But in a weird way it's opened my eyes to what different guys can do."

What is Stamkos doing?

The Aircast gives him some mobility and comfort. He can even take it off for treatment, GM Steve Yzerman wrote in a text message, impossible with a hard cast. "He has to wear it when he walks on it … and when he sleeps to keep his ankle in a stretched position," Yzerman wrote.

CHANGES: Perhaps most of all, Stamkos' absence has affected personnel on the power play.

In Saturday's 6-3 loss to the Coyotes, forwards Valtteri Filppula, Teddy Purcell and Marty St. Louis, and D Victor Hedman were the first unit. The second unit was forwards Tyler Johnson, Richard Panik, Alex Killorn and Brett Connolly, and D Sami Salo, with Radko Gudas sprinkled in.

Beyond two goals scored in Thursday's 5-1 win over the Ducks, which broke a 0-for-21 power-play slump, the shifts have greater effects, Cooper said: "Now there's not the go-to guy we are going to. We've got to make plays. Now there's more movement. … When Stamkos comes back, he's going to be first over the boards on the power play. But we're going to have a different mentality when he does come back."

MEDICAL MATTERS: Salo played after missing two games with a lower-body injury. … D Mark Barberio (left hand/arm) and D Keith Aulie (upper body) were scratched. Both skated in the morning, Aulie in a no-contact jersey. Cooper said both might be ready by the trip's end Friday.

ODDS AND ENDS: Tampa Bay got its first loss against the West (7-1-0). … The Coyotes (9-0-1) and Ducks (8-0-0) are the only teams undefeated at home in regulation. … F P.C. Labrie and D Dmitry Korobov also were scratched.

Stamkos, Lightning in injury routines 11/16/13 [Last modified: Sunday, November 17, 2013 12:34am]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Road to Atlanta: Tell us how you really feel, Jimbo

    College

    Topped out

    TUSCALOOSA, AL - OCTOBER 21:  Rashaan Evans #32 of the Alabama Crimson Tide tackles Jarrett Guarantano #2 of the Tennessee Volunteers at Bryant-Denny Stadium on October 21, 2017 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images) 775042495
  2. Journal: USF gets support on the road

    College

    NEW ORLEANS — Perhaps it was the chance to witness the first USF-Tulane game ever, or an opportunity to frolic in the French Quarter for a weekend. Or both.

    USF running back D'Ernest Johnson (2) stiff-arms Tulane cornerback Parry Nickerson (17) on a run during the second half of an NCAA college football game in New Orleans, La., Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Derick E. Hingle) LADH111
  3. Joey Knight's takeaways from USF-Tulane

    College

    1. Saturday's triumph will do little to fortify USF's strength of schedule, but its strength-of-character quotient might have increased. On the road facing an eclectic offense, the Bulls built a huge lead, then made critical plays in the waning moments after some defensive lapses. In short, they survived. Isn't …

    South Florida defensive end Greg Reaves (41) reacts after a defensive stop against Tulane during the first half of an NCAA college football game in New Orleans, La., Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Derick E. Hingle) LADH107
  4. No. 16 USF hangs on at Tulane, off to first 7-0 start

    College

    NEW ORLEANS — After half a season of mismatches, USF found itself in a grudge match Saturday night.

    USF quarterback Quinton Flowers (9) runs for a touchdown against Tulane during the first half of an NCAA college football game in New Orleans, La., Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017. (AP Photo/Derick E. Hingle) LADH103
  5. Lightning journal: Tighter defense fuels hot start

    Lightning Strikes

    TAMPA — See what happens when you keep the crease clean, limit the traffic in front of G Andrei Vasilevskiy and limit Grade A scoring chances?

    Yanni Gourde, right, gets a late first-period goal that follows a big save by Andrei Vasilevskiy.