Martin was vile, too, Incognito lawyer says

Richie Incognito and his representative had plenty to say Thursday in a rebuttal to Jonathan Martin's recent claims that Incognito's behavior forced him to leave the Dolphins in October.

Martin continued to paint Incognito, his former teammate, as a bully, and claimed Dolphins coaches knew he was having issues with teammates.

He has consistently used a series of racially charged and threatening text messages and voice mails as his evidence against Incognito. But according to Mark Schamel, Incognito's lawyer, Martin's characterization of his relationship with Incognito, and his role in their vile back-and-forth communication, is off-base.

In communications that were provided to Ted Wells, who leads the NFL's independent investigation into the bullying saga, Schamel claims Martin sent text messages to Incognito that threatened to send someone over to Incognito's home with a "tranquilizer gun and sandpaper condoms" to rape him.

Schamel said there was also a threat to kill Incognito's whole family, and a statement where Martin indicated he would ejaculate in Incognito's face.

"Richie Incognito has owned his inappropriate comments, despite the fact that they were made in jest, and it is time for Jonathan Martin to do the same," Schamel said in a statement.

Schamel also claimed Martin raised concerns about his erratic play, which prompted the Dolphins to trade for Bryant McKinnie, and move him to the starting right tackle the week before he left the team after a lunch room prank the offensive linemen played on him.

"It was only after sharing these concerns, and Martin's abandonment of the team, that the bullying allegations were raised," Schamel said. "Rather than deal with his poor on-field performance and myriad other issues, Martin is now hiding behind false allegations."

On Thursday, Incognito returned to social media and made a public plea for work, tweeting, "I need a job."

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Martin was vile, too, Incognito lawyer says 01/30/14 [Last modified: Thursday, January 30, 2014 10:15pm]

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