Mostly Cloudy79° FULL FORECASTMostly Cloudy79° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

Get the quickest, smartest news, analysis and photos from the Bucs game emailed to you shortly after the final whistle.

(View our Privacy Policy)

2122745 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2013-05-23 08:30:00.0 UTC 2013-05-23T04:30:00.000-04:00 tampa-bays-coaches-headline-sneaker-soiree published 2013-05-24 04:13:16.0 UTC 2013-05-24T00:13:16.000-04:00 sports/news DTI 107365348 TAMPA They are as different as the sports they lead. There's Rays manager Joe Maddon. He's the dean of Tampa Bay sports, having skippered the Rays for eight seasons now. Born in Pennsylvania, but California cool. Laid back. The personality of a hippie. A baseball lifer. There's Bucs coach Greg Schiano. Jersey kid. Hard-nosed, no-nonsense, set in his ways. Yet charismatic. A former college coach. He has been around these parts for a year. Then there's the new guy, Lightning coach Jon Cooper, hired late last season. Raised in British Columbia. A lawyer who somehow fell into coaching kids and kept getting promoted until he landed in the best league in the world. Smart. An odd cat, but in the best possible sense. All three met for the first time Thursday night in Tampa at the third annual Sneaker Soiree, which celebrates the best in Tampa Bay sports and sports business. They sat at a bar and sipped beer and talked about being coaches. But here's the thing you notice about the three after you've sifted through all of their differences in upbringing, background, experience and personality: They really are all very much alike. Their methods might be different, but their passion for winning is the same and it all begins and ends with one thing. And, really, at the end of the day, it's the key to coaching. "Communication," Schiano said. "In the end, it's all about communication." It's all about reaching players, getting the most out of them in good times and bad, during winning streaks and losing droughts, during postseason runs and below .500 seasons. For Maddon, it's reaching into a bag of tricks, like bringing in DJs, chasing penguins and cockatoos and magicians around the clubhouse. It's dressing up for road trips and giving hugs even when a player goes 0-for-4 or gives up a walk-off homer. "There's already so much pressure on the boys," Maddon said. "There is always so much going on. Treat it as it's supposed to be treated. It's a game. It's not life and death. If they show up with a clear mind and not a heavy cloud over their head, they will be fine. Give them freedom. They are, for the most part, grown-ups. Give them some latitude and you're going to get much greater return. "Keep it loose, keep it fun." And that's what Maddon has done regardless of the circumstances. It's what he does when the Rays win, and it's what he especially does when the Rays struggle. It's, perhaps, his greatest strength. "One thing about Joe is he is as steady as he goes," Schiano said. So what does a toes-on-the-line, blowing-the-whistle task-master like Schiano think when Maddon is opening up his clubhouse to a merengue band? "You got to do what's in your personality," Schiano said. And would he ever do such a thing? "You got to do what's in your personality," Schiano said with a laugh. Even Schiano knows he would be the last guy to be your everyday Joe. It's simply not in his personality. For Schiano, he has a plan in mind and a way to carry out that plan. "You have to stay the course because you know there are going to be changes around you," Schiano said. "You have to be willing to adapt, but you have to stick to your guns, too." Meantime, Cooper is more like "Merlot Joe" than tough-guy Greg. During a lengthy losing streak in the minors, he turned the locker room into a game room complete with a dartboard tournament. "These players work so darn hard and there's so much competition," Cooper said. "It's all-consuming. Not only of the body, but the mind. And you've got to keep it loose." Their conversation at the bar ended and as the crowd started to thin out, you were left wondering what was the best way to coach a team. Is it Maddon with his circus animals and live music and even-keel ways? Is it Schiano with his discipline and obsessive attention to details? Is it Cooper with his calm demeanor that rarely incorporates yelling? What, exactly, is the right way? Cooper smiles and says, "The winning way. That's the right way." By Tom Jones, Times Sports Columnist Sports, News_Sports, top-news, latest sports, breaking-news Tampa Bay's coaches share tips at Sneaker Soiree JHIATTN Big Three bring same coaching qualities to Sneaker Soiree. 4STC Sports 2 Star they fit great <p><b>>></b><b>fast facts</b></p><p><b>Soiree honors</b></p><p>Awards handed out Thursday night at the third annual Sneaker Soiree:</p><p><b>Sports Community Moment of the Year: </b>Rowdies win NASL championship</p><p><b>USF Moment of the Year: </b>Softball team goes to College World Series</p><p><b>Freddie Solomon Moral Courage Award: </b>High school basketball player Kevin Garcia</p><p><b>Tampa Bay Bucs Moment of the Year: </b>Ronde Barber's 200th consecutive start</p><p><b>Tampa Bay Lightning Moment of the Year:</b> Marty St. Louis wins NHL scoring title</p><p><b>Tom McEwen Community Advocate Award:</b> Fred Karl</p><p><b>Tampa Bay Rays Moment of the Year:</b> David Price wins Cy Young</p><p><b>Lee Roy Selmon Lifetime Achievement Award: </b>Outback's Bob Basham and Chris Sullivan</p><p></p> 1 sp_tjones052413-2STC they fit great 2013-05-24 04:00:00.0 UTC 2013-05-24T00:00:00.000-04:00 1 From left, Lightning coach Jon Cooper, Rays manager Joe Maddon and Bucs coach Greg Schiano gather together for the first time, holding a &#8220;coaches corner&#8221; segment at the third annual Sneaker Soiree at TPepin&#8217;s Hospitality Centre in Tampa. /resources/images/dti/2013/05/c4s_sneaker052413_10830071.jpg DANIEL WALLACE | Times /resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/c4s_sneaker052413_10830071_4col.jpg/resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/c4s_sneaker052413_10830071_8col.jpg 2 Former Bucs defensive back Ronde Barber receives a key to Tampa from Mayor Bob Buckhorn at the Sneaker Soiree, which celebrates local sports and sports business success. /resources/images/dti/2013/05/c4s_barber052413_10830081.jpg DANIEL WALLACE | Times /resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/c4s_barber052413_10830081_4col.jpg/resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/c4s_barber052413_10830081_8col.jpg 5 Rob Higgins, executive director of the nonprofit Tampa Bay Sports Commission, shows off his pink shoes at the Sneaker Soiree. /resources/images/dti/2013/05/0431165572_10830088.jpg DANIEL WALLACE | Times /resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/0431165572_10830088_4col.jpg/resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/0431165572_10830088_8col.jpg 3 From left, the Lightning&#8217;s Marty St. Louis, USF football coach Willie Taggart and USF basketball coach Stan Heath watch as pro wrestler Titus O&#8217;Neil removes Rob Higgins from the stage at the Sneaker Soiree. /resources/images/dti/2013/05/0431165654_10830182.jpg DANIEL WALLACE | Times /resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/0431165654_10830182_4col.jpg/resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/0431165654_10830182_8col.jpg 4 From left, Bucs Gerald McCoy and Doug Martin, Lightning&#8217;s Marty St. Louis, USF football coach Willie Taggart and USF basketball coach Stan Heath look on as pro wrestler Titus O&#8217;Neil takes the stage at the Sneaker Soiree. /resources/images/dti/2013/05/0431165623_10830143.jpg DANIEL WALLACE | Times /resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/0431165623_10830143_4col.jpg/resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/0431165623_10830143_8col.jpg 6 Tampa Mayor Bob Buckhorn, left, gives Ronde Barber, second from left, a key to the city during the Sneaker Soiree. /resources/images/dti/2013/05/c4s_sneakerone052413_10830060.jpg DANIEL WALLACE | Times /resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/c4s_sneakerone052413_10830060_4col.jpg/resources/images/dti/rendered/2013/05/c4s_sneakerone052413_10830060_8col.jpg true templatedata/tampabaytimes/StaffArticle/data/2013/05/23/107365348-tampa-bays-coaches-headline-sneaker-soiree StaffArticle 2013-05-24 03:10:26.0 UTC 2013-05-23T23:10:26.000-04:00 TAMPAThey are as different as the sports they lead.Sports, News_Sports, top-news, latest sports, breaking-newsSports, News_Sports, top-news, latest sports, breaking-newsTom Jones 380230 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2012-10-25 12:48:00.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:48:00.000-04:00 tom-jones published 2014-07-17 16:19:59.0 UTC 2014-07-17T12:19:59.000-04:00 Tom Jones <p>Tom Jones writes columns and television/radio commentary for the <i>Tampa Bay Times</i>' Sports section. He has covered everything from high schools to colleges to professional sports since starting with the St. Petersburg <i>Evening Independent </i>in 1986. After the <i>Independent</i>, Tom worked at the Times (1987-91), the <i>Tampa Tribune</i> (1991-96), the Times again (1996-2000), the <i>Minneapolis Star-Tribune</i> (2000-03) and returned for his third stint at the <i>Times</i> in 2003. Though he has covered all sports, Tom is a hockey writer at heart. He covered the Tampa Bay Lightning from its first game in 1992 until moving to Minnesota to cover the Wild for three years. He returned to the <i>Times</i> again to cover the Lightning until taking over as writer and editor for Page Two in 2006. He lists Herb Brooks, Lou Piniella and Wayne Gretzky as the most interesting personalities he has covered and the 2002 Winter Olympics as the best event he has covered. Tom co-hosts a sports talk show weekday mornings from 6-9 on WDAE 620-AM, 95.3-FM. He previously hosted a weekly sports roundtable show on Bright House Sports Network.</p> Times Sports Columnist writers DTI 35040721 Tom Jones writes columns and television/radio commentary for the Tampa Bay Times' Sports section. He has covered everything from high schools to colleges to professional sports since starting with the St. Petersburg Evening Independent in 1986. After the Independent, Tom worked at the Times (1987-91), the Tampa Tribune (1991-96), the Times again (1996-2000), the Minneapolis Star-Tribune (2000-03) and returned for his third stint at the Times in 2003. Though he has covered all sports, Tom is a hockey writer at heart. He covered the Tampa Bay Lightning from its first game in 1992 until moving to Minnesota to cover the Wild for three years. He returned to the Times again to cover the Lightning until taking over as writer and editor for Page Two in 2006. He lists Herb Brooks, Lou Piniella and Wayne Gretzky as the most interesting personalities he has covered and the 2002 Winter Olympics as the best event he has covered. Tom co-hosts a sports talk show weekday mornings from 6-9 on WDAE 620-AM, 95.3-FM. He previously hosted a weekly sports roundtable show on Bright House Sports Network. <p>Phone: (727) 893-8544</p> <p>Email: <a href="mailto:tjones@tampabay.com">tjones@tampabay.com</a></p> <p>Radio talk show (620-AM, 95.3-FM): <a href="http://www.iheart.com/live/673/?autoplay=true">Listen live</a></p> 1 /resources/images/dti/2013/01/Tom_Jones_wp.jpg true templatedata/tampabaytimes/AuthorProfile/data/35040721-tom-jones AuthorProfile 2012-10-25 12:48:00.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:48:00.000-04:00 <span style="display:none;" class="author vcard"><span class="fn">TOM JONES</span></span><span style="display:none;" class="source-org vcard"><span class="org fn">Tampa Bay Times</span></span><a rel="item-license" href="/universal/user_agreement.shtml">&#169; 2016 Tampa Bay Times</a><br /><br />Times Sports Columnist 2282063 2016-06-17 04:24:29.0 UTC 2 Months Ago tampa-bay-sneaker-soiree-honors-areas-best-tugs-at-emotions sports/humaninterest Tampa Bay Sneaker Soiree honors area's best, tugs at emotions StaffArticle 2288988 2016-08-10 21:10:48.0 UTC 3 Weeks Ago lawrence-samuels-out-as-tampa-bay-storm-coach sports/football/storm Lawrence Samuels out as Tampa Bay Storm coach StaffArticle 2284711 2016-07-08 21:47:22.0 UTC 2 Months Ago shares-in-gun-companies-surge-and-chatter-at-tampa-bay-gun-shops-increases news/business Shares in gun companies surge, chatter at Tampa Bay gun shops increases after week of violence StaffArticle <p>TAMPA</p> <p>They are as different as the sports they lead.</p> <p>There's Rays manager Joe Maddon. He's the dean of Tampa Bay sports, having skippered the Rays for eight seasons now. Born in Pennsylvania, but California cool. Laid back. The personality of a hippie. A baseball lifer.</p> <p>There's Bucs coach Greg Schiano. Jersey kid. Hard-nosed, no-nonsense, set in his ways. Yet charismatic. A former college coach. He has been around these parts for a year.</p> <p>Then there's the new guy, Lightning coach Jon Cooper, hired late last season. Raised in British Columbia. A lawyer who somehow fell into coaching kids and kept getting promoted until he landed in the best league in the world. Smart. An odd cat, but in the best possible sense.</p> <p>All three met for the first time Thursday night in Tampa at the third annual Sneaker Soiree, which celebrates the best in Tampa Bay sports and sports business.</p> <p>They sat at a bar and sipped beer and talked about being coaches.</p> <p>But here's the thing you notice about the three after you've sifted through all of their differences in upbringing, background, experience and personality: They really are all very much alike.</p> <p>Their methods might be different, but their passion for winning is the same and it all begins and ends with one thing. And, really, at the end of the day, it's the key to coaching.</p> <p>&quot;Communication,&quot; Schiano said. &quot;In the end, it's all about communication.&quot;</p> <p>It's all about reaching players, getting the most out of them in good times and bad, during winning streaks and losing droughts, during postseason runs and below .500 seasons.</p> <p>For Maddon, it's reaching into a bag of tricks, like bringing in DJs, chasing penguins and cockatoos and magicians around the clubhouse. It's dressing up for road trips and giving hugs even when a player goes 0-for-4 or gives up a walk-off homer.</p> <p>&quot;There's already so much pressure on the boys,&quot; Maddon said. &quot;There is always so much going on. Treat it as it's supposed to be treated. It's a game. It's not life and death. If they show up with a clear mind and not a heavy cloud over their head, they will be fine. Give them freedom. They are, for the most part, grown-ups. Give them some latitude and you're going to get much greater return.</p> <p>&quot;Keep it loose, keep it fun.&quot;</p> <p>And that's what Maddon has done regardless of the circumstances. It's what he does when the Rays win, and it's what he especially does when the Rays struggle. It's, perhaps, his greatest strength.</p> <p>&quot;One thing about Joe is he is as steady as he goes,&quot; Schiano said.</p> <p>So what does a toes-on-the-line, blowing-the-whistle task-master like Schiano think when Maddon is opening up his clubhouse to a merengue band?</p> <p>&quot;You got to do what's in your personality,&quot; Schiano said.</p> <p>And would he ever do such a thing?</p> <p>&quot;You got to do what's in your personality,&quot; Schiano said with a laugh.</p> <p>Even Schiano knows he would be the last guy to be your everyday Joe. It's simply <i>not</i> in his personality. For Schiano, he has a plan in mind and a way to carry out that plan.</p> <p>&quot;You have to stay the course because you know there are going to be changes around you,&quot; Schiano said. &quot;You have to be willing to adapt, but you have to stick to your guns, too.&quot;</p> <p>Meantime, Cooper is more like &quot;Merlot Joe&quot; than tough-guy Greg. During a lengthy losing streak in the minors, he turned the locker room into a game room complete with a dartboard tournament.</p> <p>&quot;These players work so darn hard and there's so much competition,&quot; Cooper said. &quot;It's all-consuming. Not only of the body, but the mind. And you've got to keep it loose.&quot;</p> <p>Their conversation at the bar ended and as the crowd started to thin out, you were left wondering what was the best way to coach a team.</p> <p>Is it Maddon with his circus animals and live music and even-keel ways? Is it Schiano with his discipline and obsessive attention to details? Is it Cooper with his calm demeanor that rarely incorporates yelling?</p> <p>What, exactly, is the right way?</p> <p>Cooper smiles and says, &quot;The winning way. That's the right way.&quot;</p>trueruntime2016-08-30 06:00:35