London Olympics news and notes: Meet the former Seminole who is Usain Bolt's unofficial bodyguard

flag etiquette lesson

Win a medal, grab a flag, pose for pictures. Oh, if that was only that simple. Part of the pre-Games training for U.S. athletes from the Olympic committee is on how to hold the flag: right hand on stars, left hand on stripes. The athletes are expected to do it right. "The (U.S. Olympic Committee) take the ambassador program very seriously," said Bill Mallon, a historian. "They try to avoid the ugly American image by doing proper things at the Games and teaching (athletes) the right things to do."

success sells and saves ad $$$

Usain Bolt is money in so many ways. His 100-meter win Sunday was the equivalent of $1.7 million worth of ad time on NBC for sponsor Puma, says Front Row Analytics, a product placement and sponsorship analysis firm.

readers ask us

Are the high school and college athletes who win a medal still eligible to play on their school teams in that sport? Since they win money for medals, it makes me curious.

Under NCAA rules, athletes who want to maintain eligibility can accept prize money as long as it does not total more than what they paid in travel, equipment, training, etc. for the event.

Compiled by staff writer Sharon Fink from the Associated Press, NBCOlympics.com.

A TV commentator said the face price for a swimming ticket was $700 and that scalpers were trying to get as much as $10,000 for the premiere events, like Michael Phelps races. What are the face prices for some of the various events? Is scalping legal in London?

The lowest ticket price for every event was around $31. Among the most popular events, swimming's top price was about $705, track and field's $1,133 and basketball's $235. Among other events, table tennis topped out at about $195, badminton $235 and taekwondo $150. Ticket scalping is illegal in England. At the beginning of the Games, London police said they had already arrested 18 people for scalping.

mess with bolt, you mess with him

Former FSU All-America shot putter and assistant coach Dorian Scott could be Jamaica's second most famous athlete at the Games. And not because he became the island nation's first shot put finalist. Scott is Usain Bolt's unofficial bodyguard. • "Usain gets harassed everywhere he goes," Scott says, telling the story of how he got the job. "We're just eating together, and people start coming over, and we just kind of tell them to stop. The next day an article comes out saying that I'm his bodyguard and that I used to be a bouncer in Jamaica. I'm from Springfield, N.J. I went to Seton Hall Prep. I don't know where that came from." • Scott, listed at 6 feet 1 and 291 pounds on his Olympic bio, earned a social science degree from FSU in 2007. He also was on Jamaica's 2008 Olympic team (he finished 15th); his experience with Bolt was quite different then. • "We just hung out in the cafeteria. We can't do that (in London)." • Scott, 30, is now an assistant coach at San Diego State. He made the Games by coming back from a 2010 Achilles injury. "This is just a dream," he says. • At the opening ceremony, he was fending off the Japanese and Italians while Kobe Bryant and LeBron James oohed and ahhhed at the sight of Bolt. • "I didn't really know (Bolt) blew up that big, to be honest with you," Scott says. "It's just nuts, man."

London Olympics news and notes: Meet the former Seminole who is Usain Bolt's unofficial bodyguard 08/06/12 [Last modified: Monday, August 6, 2012 10:28pm]

    

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