Make us your home page
Instagram

Get the quickest, smartest news, analysis and photos from the Bucs game emailed to you shortly after the final whistle.

(View our Privacy Policy)

NHL EDITION

On its coast-to-coast rush of 1967, the NHL scored

The NHL's "great expansion" of 1967 delivered hockey to California, led to the "Broad Street Bullies" and legitimized the league as a major force in North American professional sports.

Fifty years ago this week, the owners of the original six teams unanimously approved doubling in size by awarding franchises to Los Angeles, San Francisco/Oakland, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St. Louis and Minneapolis/St. Paul. No other pro sports league had ever doubled the number of its teams and the move was considered a gamble. It proved to be one of the most important decisions in hockey history, and helped convince many that the NHL was for real.

"It had a major impact on the league because thereafter there was almost a lineup for other cities to want to join the league," said Brian O'Neill, who oversaw the 1967 expansion draft and scheduling. "That was a key to the expansion, to spread the game from California to New York. ... It convinced a lot of people that hockey was a major sport now and it was coast-to-coast and that selling franchises would not be difficult."

From 1943 to 1967, the NHL was a stable, six-team league made up of the New York Rangers, Boston Bruins, Chicago Blackhawks, Detroit Red Wings, Montreal Canadiens and Toronto Maple Leafs. The move to expand came in the league's 50th season amid plenty of internal debate.

Owners considered adding two teams at a time, but at their Feb. 7-9 meeting in New York they unanimously approved what president Clarence Campbell later referred to as the "great expansion." Hockey had some catching up to do: Major League Baseball had 20 teams, the NBA had nine and the NFL had 14, with more on the way. Those leagues all had a presence in California, too, something the NHL needed.

"The big issue, of course, is television," O'Neill said Tuesday. "They wanted to get national. That's why it was important to have L.A. and at that time Oakland, and then all the others followed in."

Owners each paid the $2 million expansion fee, and the Los Angeles Kings and California Seals joined the fold along with the Philadelphia Flyers, Pittsburgh Penguins, St. Louis Blues and Minnesota North Stars. New owners needed the draw of facing traditional opponents while the old-guard owners wanted to make sure their teams could still win, so the expansion teams went into the new West Division with the champions of East and West meeting for the Stanley Cup.

The goal was to help new teams, not hurt the old ones.

"When they made expansion, they took the players that were expendable, put them on a team and called them a team," said Bob Kelly, who was part of the early Flyers teams. "We didn't have the real identity that an Original Six team has or the history behind that. (We were) just happy to be in the NHL."

It worked in most places, as an Original Six team won the Cup the first six years before Kelly and the Flyers' "Broad Street Bullies" teams broke through with in 1974 and 1975.

Despite the Seals never catching on and moving to Cleveland before folding in 1978, the NHL expanded to Vancouver, Buffalo, Long Island and Washington, and reached 21 teams with the integration of the WHA in 1979.

Hockey returned to the Bay Area with the San Jose Sharks in 1991, and after the North Stars became the Dallas Stars in 1993, Minnesota got the Wild in 2000. The NHL returned to Atlanta (which didn't work) and Denver (which did) and has landed in Phoenix, South Florida and Tampa. The NHL now stands at 30 teams and is considering expanding once again.

On its coast-to-coast rush of 1967, the NHL scored 02/11/16 [Last modified: Thursday, February 11, 2016 8:22pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Cue the Scott Frost to Nebraska speculation

    Blogs

    Nebraska shook up the college sports world Thursday afternoon when it fired athletic director Shawn Eichorst.

    And that should scare UCF fans.

  2. USF defense feeds on Temple offense to take NCAA interceptions lead

    College

    TAMPA — Backed up in his end zone, Temple quarterback Logan Marchi scrambled, trying to elude a USF defensive end coming straight for him. Until then, Marchi hadn't had much luck hitting his receivers.

    South Florida Bulls safety Devin Abraham (20) sacks Temple Owls quarterback Logan Marchi (12) during the first half at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida on Thursday, September 21, 2017.
  3. No. 21 USF Bulls roll over Temple to stay undefeated

    College

    TAMPA — They emerged from Raymond James Stadium's southwest tunnel on the 11-month anniversary of their public humiliation at Temple.

    Bulls tailback Darius Tice, who rushes for 117 yards, is elated by his 47-yard run for a touchdown in the second quarter for a 10-0 lead.
  4. Fennelly: USF thrashes Temple to stay unbeaten; too bad not many saw it in person

    College

    TAMPA

    No. 21 USF ran its record to 4-0 Thursday night with some payback against Temple, a 43-7 trouncing, no contest, as if anyone cares, at least judging by the paltry crowd at Raymond James Stadium. Where was everybody?

    Bulls cornerback Deatrick Nichols (3) celebrates with teammates after making a defensive play during the first half.
  5. Former Ray Tim Beckham's over being traded, or is he?

    The Heater

    BALTIMORE — As the Rays reunited Thursday with Tim Beckham for the first time since he was dealt July 31 to Baltimore, it became very clear that not everything in assessing the trade is as it appears.

    Tim Beckham, here in action Monday against the Red Sox, has hit .310, with 10 homers and 26 RBIs since going to the Orioles.