Clear70° FULL FORECASTClear70° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

Get the quickest, smartest news, analysis and photos from the Bucs game emailed to you shortly after the final whistle.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Captain's Corner

Captain's Corner: Going after large redfish

Large redfish schools are active in the Pinellas Point area after all the afternoon storms have dropped water temperatures from the 90s to the low 80s. I have spots to fish on a low tide, and I have spots to fish on a high tide. Low-tide spots can be the most difficult to find. Redfish like to have a certain amount of water to swim in. When it gets too low, they will rapidly move to deeper water. I watch the school's movement each time and pay attention to which direction the school falls off the flat. After years of watching schools of fish, I've put together a theory of their movements and where they're going to go on whatever the tide is doing. Figure that out and you have a low-tide spot of your own. The past two times that I have hit my low-tide spots have yielded big numbers of fish that I haven't seen in a few years. This time of year is the best for any type of bait. I like to throw my cast net around a bridge to fill the well. The water level is critical on what type of bait to use. Reds are very wary and will spook easily in low water, therefore a lighter bait is needed. I use shrimp on lower tides. It will increase your chances on a hook-up, or you can use a soft plastic that is rigged Texas style that will provide a weedless setup. On higher tides, reds are far less spooky and will eat just about any type of bait thrown at them.

Rob Gorta charters out of St. Petersburg. Call him at (727) 647-7606 or visit captainrobgorta.com.

Captain's Corner: Going after large redfish 09/01/16 [Last modified: Thursday, September 1, 2016 7:23pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2016 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...