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Captain's Corner

Captain's Corner: It's a great time to target tarpon

Tarpon fishing is the biggest thing happening along the Suncoast. Full moon outgoing tides are moving lots of water which transports millions of swimming crabs, shrimp, and small fish from the estuaries to the Gulf. On the Suncoast, many inlets from John's Pass to Tarpon Springs are likely to have at least a few tarpon lingering around. Generally speaking the larger the pass, the more tarpon it will have. By far the biggest in our area is the Egmont Key channel, where much of the Tampa Bay estuary squeezes through the cut, concentrating the food sources to maximum levels. The tarpon action can be crowded at times, but there is usually somewhere to find hungry fish outside the main feeding zone. The small swimming crabs that the tarpon gorge upon flow all around the area, not just in the main channel. One of my favorite places is along the shallow edges of adjacent sand bars or flats. The fish here feed by gently sipping crabs from the surface without making a big splash. It takes patience and a good eye to notice them, then getting hooked up is easy. Simply cast a live crab well up-current from the spot you see them and allow it to drift naturally with the tide.

Ed Walker charters out of Tarpon Springs. He can be contacted at info@lighttacklecharters.com or at (727) 944-3474.

Captain's Corner: It's a great time to target tarpon 05/23/16 [Last modified: Monday, May 23, 2016 6:55pm]
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