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Captain's Corner

Captain's Corner: This time of year, remain flexible

Brent Gaskill

Brent Gaskill

Changing weather patterns are typical this time of year. Cold fronts, wind direction, moon phases and water temperatures all keep fish on the move. While some fish may leave an area others will usually fill in behind them as waves of migratory species work through our region. We recently experienced back-to-back days with drastically different results. One day the beach was choked with juvenile Spanish sardines combined with diving birds giving away the location of the largest concentrations. Schools of Spanish mackerel were corralling the smaller baitfish into tight balls, resulting in a feeding frenzy. We found excellent action casting weighted jigs into the melee and reeling as fast as possible. The next day the wind changed direction and the baitfish were gone. No birds were visible for miles, and we struggled to catch a single mackerel. This scenario shows why it's important to have a backup plan and staying on the move until fish are found. It's never a bad idea to begin where you left fish the previous day, but if it's not working, read the conditions and adjust as needed.

Brent Gaskill runs Summer Vacation Charters out of the St. Petersburg area and can be reached at captbrent@summervacationcharters.com and (727) 510-1009.

Captain's Corner: This time of year, remain flexible 11/21/16 [Last modified: Monday, November 21, 2016 4:29pm]
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