Sunday, June 24, 2018
Outdoors

Grunts: As good to eat as they are easy to catch

MADEIRA BEACH — White grunts could be the most under appreciated fish in the Gulf of Mexico.

People love to catch grouper and snapper, but these bottom dwellers rival both species as table fare and can be caught by just about any angler, regardless of skill level.

"That's how I built my reputation," joked Dave Zalewski, one of the longest running charter boat captains on the west coast of Florida. "That's why they call me Captain Grunt."

In an industry that has seen hundreds of fishing guides come and go in recent decades, Zalewski has passed the test of time, in part, because of an open mind.

"A lot of people ignore these fish," he said. "But they are great eating and a lot of fun to catch. After all, isn't that what fishing is all about? Having fun?"

Zalewski motored his sportfisherman, Lucky Too, out of the Madeira Beach Marina one recent morning and headed offshore in search of white grunts, the species of choice for an upcoming tournament sponsored by the Old Salt Fishing Club.

"I take a lot of families out fishing," Zalewski said. "I think it is about time somebody came up with a tournament that the average family can participate in."

Zalewski likes to downplay his angling skill. But the 69-year-old guide has caught just about everything that swims in the Gulf of Mexico. He loves his job, and when the catching is done, he likes to strap on a scuba tank and check out his "gardens," the natural patches of exposed limestone that fish such as grouper, snapper and, of course, white grunts call home.

These benthic predators, relatives of the pigfish and tomtate, can be found on offshore hard bottom in up to 115 feet deep. They are most abundant in water 80 feet or less, or about an hour's ride for most fishing boats.

But Zalewski likes to make the most of his fishing day, so a couple of miles from shore, he cut his speed and tossed out a couple of silver spoons trolled behind planers.

"We'll just see what we catch," he told the three young anglers aboard.

It didn't take more than a few minutes before the port rod bent under the weight of a fat Spanish mackerel. More followed suit. Then their big cousins, the king mackerel, arrived. After an hour or so of catching "schoolie" sized kings, the kids started complaining about the soreness in their arms.

"Now we'll go catch some grunts," he said. "I think it will only take us one stop to get dinner."

The great thing about fishing for grunts is they eat just about anything. All you need is a box of frozen squid and circle hooks, and the fish will practically catch themselves.

Grunts get their name from the sound that is amplified by their air bladder when they grind their teeth. The average white grunt, sometimes mistakenly called gray snapper (which in local waters is called the mangrove snapper), usually weighs 1 to 1 1/2 pounds and measures 12 to 15 inches, but larger specimens are not unheard of. In fact, the largest grunt on record weighed 6 pounds, 8 ounces and was caught off Brunswick, Ga., in 1989. But here on the Gulf Coast, an 18-incher is considered a prized catch.

The only downside to fishing for white grunts these days is that they tend to hang around with red and gag grouper. Grouper season is closed, so all grouper caught must be properly vented and released, which some might consider a hassle. Our party, however, considered it fun since we also had Oscar "Butch" Ayala aboard.

Ayala, a research associate with the Florida Marine Research Institute in St. Petersburg, gathers data on a variety of bottom fish. On our half-day outing we caught a half-dozen grouper that had been previously caught and tagged by other anglers.

If an angler catches a tagged fish and sends the information to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, he or she gets a free T-shirt. We not only recaptured several tagged fish but we caught and tagged some of our own, which made our young anglers eager to come back and look for "their" fish another day.

"I think we have enough for dinner, and some for Grandma and Grandpa, too," Zalewski said. "I think we should call it a day."

As we motored in, the kids sound asleep on the deck, Zalewski said: "Isn't that something when you have to fight your way through kingfish to go catch grunts. Isn't this a great place to live?"

Comments

Captainís Corner: Cool off, bring home a tasty dinner with scalloping

Whatís the best way to cool off in July and August? Go scalloping. Itís like going on an underwater Easter egg hunt that results in a bag of tasty scallops to cook up. The most popular places to scallop are in Homosassa and Steinhatchee in 2 feet of ...
Published: 06/21/18
Updated: 06/22/18

Captainís Corner: Size of sea trout a welcome surprise in Pinellas grass beds

A nice surprise has been the quality size of the spotted sea trout on deeper grass beds in southern Pinellas. Typically, summertime trout tend to run smaller than the 16- to 20-inch trout weíve been finding. Fishing the deep grass with scattered sand...
Published: 06/21/18

Captainís Corner: Offshore fishing will be strong for awhile

June and July offer some of the yearís best offshore fishing. Targets such as red snapper, blackfin tuna, mahi≠mahi, wahoo and sailfish make their way through our area and make appearances on many trips to depths of 120 feet or more. Red snapper are ...
Published: 06/19/18
Updated: 06/20/18

Captainís Corner: Itís a good time to focus on snook

Snook have been a main focus on my most recent trips. This time of year, snook inhabit the beaches, gathering in the ditches and swashes along shore. Jetties or rock structures are also a favorite habitat for snook to lurk, looking to ambush bait fis...
Published: 06/18/18
Updated: 06/19/18

Captainís Corner: Tips on targeting American Red Snapper

American Red Snapper (ARS) season opened a few days ago and some types of bottom are holding bigger schools of ARS then other bottom types. The hard bottom areas that most fishermen prefer are holding large schools of ARS, but the fish have yet to m...
Published: 06/18/18

Captainís Corner: Trout bite at its best

The trout bite has been the best Iíve seen all year. Fish up to 26 inches have been common recently. Fish are sitting on the flatsí deeper edges, where the water is deeper and cooler, and moves a little more swiftly. Live sardines and hard plastic ba...
Published: 06/16/18
Updated: 06/17/18

Captainís Corner: Fishing this month is all about diversity

This is the month of diverse opportunity. The choice of species is unlimited, as long as you have the bait. You can target snook and tarpon in the morning, then fish for Spanish mackerel, bluefish, snapper, sharks and cobia in the afternoon. The tarp...
Published: 06/15/18

Captainís Corner: When itís tarpon time, itís also shark time

Tarpon get most of the attention when talking about exciting fly action for large fish in our area. Baitfish are more prolific, and large tarpon follow their forage and populate most of our local waters. Following them are fish that consider tarpon t...
Published: 06/12/18
Updated: 06/14/18

Captainís Corner: This is your best time for tarpon fishing

Now is the best time to target tarpon. Silver kings are cruising the beaches on their yearly migration up and down the stateís west coast. This weekís strong new moon tides and the strong full moon tides in two weeks provide some of the best action f...
Published: 06/12/18
Updated: 06/13/18

Captainís Corner: Turn attention to gag grouper and red snapper

Attention has turned to gag grouper and red snapper for many offshore fishermen. Red snapper can be best targeted in waters 105 feet and deeper, with some available in water as shallow as 60 feet. Although the snapper will be found on high profile st...
Published: 06/11/18
Updated: 06/12/18