Friday, November 17, 2017
Outdoors

Outdoors news and notes: Ladies-only event features inshore and offshore species

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Making news

Ladies-only event sends anglers afar

The Old Salt Fishing Club, the organization that runs the fall and spring King of the Beach kingfish series and the annual Grunt Hunt, continues its tournament for female anglers. More than 170 women have already signed up for the Ladies Inshore/Offshore tournament scheduled for Aug. 25.

The captains' meeting is 7 p.m. Thursday at the Madeira Beach Marina (503 150th Ave.), and fishing begins at midnight Aug. 25, with a weigh-in at 4 p.m. at the marina.

This year's event will again benefit the Celma Mastry Ovarian Cancer Foundation and All Children's Hospital. Celma Mastry, the matriarch of a well-known local fishing family, was a benefactor of dozens of charities.

The tournament, in which anglers can target trout, sheepshead, Spanish mackerel, flounder, redfish (photo release), snapper, red grouper and amberjack, is more like a festival, with live music, food and drink, as well as vendors of a variety of marine-related equipment. The cost is $55 for Old Salt members and $75 for nonmembers who register before Monday. After that it goes up to $65 and $85.

The Old Salt Fishing Foundation is also sponsoring a Ladies Fish-A-Thon in conjunction with the tournament, which hopes to raise $50,000 for the charities.

"We've purposely set ourselves an aggressive goal this year," said Tom Verdensky, the foundation's president. "We hope the local fishing community will step up and support these fine organizations."

To learn more, go to oldsalt fishing.org.

REgulations

Season reminders

• Amberjack season in the Gulf of Mexico opened Aug. 1 and closes June 1. The size limit is 30 inches, fork length.

• Spiny lobster season, except in designated South Florida areas, opened Aug. 6 and closes March 31. Lobster must have a carapace length of 3 inches and be measured in the water. The bag limit is six per person, per day statewide.

• Gag grouper is also open, except in the state waters (from shore to 9 nautical miles out) off Franklin, Wakulla, Jefferson and Taylor counties. The season closes Nov. 1.

Looking ahead

• Snook season opens Sept. 1 in Atlantic waters. Anglers on the Gulf Coast must practice catch-and-release through Aug. 31, 2013.

• Sept. 1 is a free fishing day for saltwater anglers throughout the state. No license is needed.

• Scallop season closes Sept. 25.

Solunar chart

AM PM

Minor Major Minor Major

8/17 5:45 11:50 6:00 0

8/18 6:30 12:15 6:50 12:40

8/19 7:25 1:10 7:50 1:35

8/20 8:15 2:05 8:45 2:30

8/21 9:10 3:00 9:40 3:25

8/22 10:05 3:55 10:45 4:30

8/23 11:10 5:00 11:40 5:25

Comments

Captainís Corner: Calm seas closer to beaches rewards with kingfish

Strong east winds have made it challenging for offshore anglers. The first few miles are quite tolerable since the land buffers the shoreline. After that, sea conditions have been tougher. Anglers searching for kingfish have been rewarded with calm s...
Published: 11/16/17

Captainís Corner: A little wind doesnít stop hot fishing in November

Despite many windy days, November fishing has been amazing. The water is cooling off, and the fish are becoming more aggressive. Itís getting to be the time of year when the cold fronts start to make their way out of the north. When this happens, win...
Published: 11/15/17

Captainís Corner: Fly fishing success possible, even in wind

When your day to fly fish arrives, do you hope for a day without wind? Knowledgeable fly fishers know there are many ways to deal with different wind situations. Avoid open water, and select an area that offers protection. Stay close to shore and use...
Published: 11/12/17
Updated: 11/14/17

Captainís Corner: Low tides and cold fronts make for rewarding fishing

Fall and winter low tides combined with cold fronts passing through can lead to highly rewarding fishing. It takes winds blowing 20-plus miles an hour out of the northeast combined with an astronomical low tide around the new moon and full moon phase...
Published: 11/12/17
Updated: 11/13/17

Captainís Corner: Reef fish abundant offshore; mackerel, kings better near shore

Before this recent cold front, we were able to travel where we wanted, and the calm seas allowed us to make the mistake of running past the best depths for our type of fishing. The 40- to 50-foot depths produced almost nonstop action from reef fish, ...
Published: 11/12/17
Captainís Corner: Mackerel still going strong in bay area

Captainís Corner: Mackerel still going strong in bay area

The fall king mackerel run is still going strong. The fish have seemed to come in waves; one week there are numerous fish more than 30 pounds, and a week or two later no one can find any more than 20. It also seems the fish are not moving south all t...
Published: 11/11/17

Captainís Corner: Cold front should push fish into backcountry waters

The approaching front is forecast to drop temperatures for a couple of days. This should push more fish into the backcountry rivers and creeks that feed the bay. Once the front passes and the weather stabilizes, fishing should return to normal. This ...
Published: 11/10/17

Captainís Corner: Kingfish domination

With calm seas and water temperature just the way they like it, kingfish will dominate much of the nearshore and offshore activity. Light wind and strong tides from the weekendís full moon have allowed nearshore waters to cleanse, so baits are being ...
Published: 11/08/17
Captainís Corner: November means strong snook fishing

Captainís Corner: November means strong snook fishing

November is the month that moves most inshore fish from the flats to the backcountry creeks, docks and rivers. Itís a month when you can enjoy great weather and great fishing without waking up at the crack of dawn. The South Shore in particular has s...
Published: 11/07/17
Updated: 11/09/17

Captainís Corner: Better late than never as flounder invade area waters

It took all year, but it has finally happened. Flounder have invaded Tampa Bay waters. They usually arrive in late spring or early summer. This year, they just hadnít come in. They are now here. The big trick is finding the larger fish. Baby flounder...
Published: 11/07/17