Make us your home page
Instagram

Get the quickest, smartest news, analysis and photos from the Bucs game emailed to you shortly after the final whistle.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Scaled sardine is prey of choice for springtime snook

Capt. Chuck Rogers shows off a net full of scaled sardines, known locally as "whitebait." This baitfish is also called "snook candy" by some local fishing guides.

TERRY TOMALIN | Times

Capt. Chuck Rogers shows off a net full of scaled sardines, known locally as "whitebait." This baitfish is also called "snook candy" by some local fishing guides.

Chuck Rogers waited for the other boats to leave the grass flat and then shut down his outboard engine.

"We'll just drift a bit, and then with one or two throws of the cast net, we'll be ready to go," he said. 'Give me a livewell full of bait and I will guarantee you a snook."

Most anglers, at least those who fish the west coast of Florida, will agree that the scaled sardine (whitebait) is the prey of choice for springtime snook.

"They can't resist them," the fishing guide explained. "It is like candy for snook."

Biologists might disagree, insisting that pinfish are found most often when looking at the contents of snook stomachs.

But the average angler banks on sardines to catch the elusive linesider. "It's a very consistent bait," said Rogers, who guides out of Tampa Harbour Marina, "especially if you have enough to use for chum."

According to Behzad Mahmoudi, a biologist with the Fish and Wildlife Research Institute in St. Petersburg, sardines are one of the most plentiful forage fish in Tampa Bay during the spring months.

"Scaled sardines are coastal and estuarine schooling pelagic fish commonly found in Tampa Bay this time of year," Mahmoudi said. "We tend to see a lot of them in April and May."

Scaled sardines are a relatively fast growing, but short-lived fish that have a life span of about one year. They can get to 6 or 7 inches long, but most specimens are in the 3- to 4-inch range.

Scaled sardines spawn offshore year-around. They feed on zooplankton and play an important role in the food chain. While they may be the favorite food of snook, everything from Spanish mackerel to blacktip shark will eat them as well.

While sardines may be a popular live bait for anglers throughout Florida, it has relatively minor commercial importance. Total statewide commercial harvest of scaled sardine in 2013 was 22,763 pounds, while the statewide recreational harvest was estimated at 857,054 pounds in 2013, according to Mahmoudi.

Rogers, meanwhile, loves to grab a handful of whitebait from the dip net and give it a good a squeeze in his fist. "It disorients them," he said. "They sort of swim around in circles, dazed and confused."

Then he throws the baitfish out across the grass flat, just to see if any snook might be in the area. His exploratory gesture was greeted with a loud "pop," the distinctive sound of snook engulfing a baitfish.

"They're here," he said.

It took less than three minutes to land the first linesider, a 24-incher that was no trophy, but a snook nonetheless.

"Do I keep my promises, or what?" Rogers asked. "Now let's catch a few more."

Know your baits

Scaled sardine: Commonly called whitebait, the scaled sardine is the Tampa Bay area's most popular baitfish. A member of the herring family, its primary mode of defense is bunching up into schools, which makes them an easy target for cast-netters.

Atlantic thread herring: Commonly called greenbacks and sometimes horse minnows, these are a good inshore and offshore bait. Make sure your hands are wet when you handle them because the scales fall off easily.

Pinfish: The favorite forage food of snook, this member of the porgy family is also the favorite target of young anglers learning to fish. Pinfish are commonly sold in bait shops. They are one of the most versatile baits available, making them a good choice for both inshore and offshore anglers.

Have trouble catching bait? Try this chum recipe:

Leftover bait from yesterday's fishing trip, chopped into small pieces.

2 cans sardines

2 cans mackerel

1 18-ounce container rolled oats

1 long squeeze of menhaden oil

Scaled sardine is prey of choice for springtime snook 04/24/14 [Last modified: Thursday, April 24, 2014 6:28pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Rick and Tom podcast: Lots of questions for college football teams in Florida

    College

    In just three weeks, the state of college football in Florida went from high expectations to lots of questions at USF with slow starts, Florida with no offense and Florida State losing quarterback Deondre …

    Despite slow starts, quarterback Quinton Flowers and USF take a 3-0 record into tonight's game against Temple. [OCTAVIO JONES | Times]
  2. Young girl injured by 105 mph foul at Yankee Stadium renews call for more netting

    Ml

    NEW YORK — A young girl at Yankee Stadium was injured by a 105 mph foul ball off the bat of Todd Frazier during Wednesday's game against Minnesota, leading some players to call for protective netting to be extended.

    Baseball fans reacts as a young girl is tended to before she is carried out of the seating area after being hit by a line drive in the fifth inning of a baseball game between the New York Yankees and Minnesota Twins, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, at Yankee Stadium in New York. [Associated Press]
  3. Morning after: Takeaways from Lightning exhibition

    Blogs

    For the Lightning, there was a lot to like in Wednesday's 4-3 exhibition win in Carolina.

    The Lightning's Erik Cernak, left, congratulates Adam Erne (73) following Erne's goal against the Carolina Hurricanes.
  4. Cesar Puello slides home to score off of a bunt single by Peter Bourjos during the second inning.
  5. Life sentence for man convicted in killing of brother of Bucs' Kwon Alexander

    Bucs

    An Alabama man who shot and killed the 17-year-old brother of Bucs linebacker Kwon Alexander in 2015 was sentenced to life in prison Wednesday, the Anniston (Ala.) Star reported.