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Schedule likely to be 48 games

The NHL appears headed toward a 48-game season for the second time in two decades.

"I think 48 is most likely at this point, unless the players can expedite their ratification process," NHL deputy commissioner Bill Daly wrote in an email Monday to the Associated Press.

The NHL shortened its 82-game slate to 48 for the 1994-95 season after a 103-day lockout. A 301-day lockout in 2004-05 made the NHL the first major North American professional sports league to lose an entire season.

When the framework of a new collective bargaining agreement was agreed to Sunday morning — after 16 hours of negotiations — there was talk of a 50-game season.

The league and players' association are working on a memorandum of understanding, which could be completed soon, then voted on by owners and players. The league has circulated a memo to teams telling them to be ready to play by Jan. 19, the date the shortened season is expected to start.

Los Angeles Kings forward Kevin Westgarth, who was part of the union negotiating team for much of the long work stoppage, expects the NHLPA to conduct a conference call to explain and answer questions about the new CBA before players vote on it online.

"Of course the league will say if the players hurry up, we can play more games, but there's a reality to consider as well," Westgarth said in a telephone interview Monday from Raleigh, N.C., where he skated informally with some Carolina Hurricanes. "But the first step is for the people who are good with words to get on paper what both sides agreed to.

"Then, we have to get guys — who are scattered all over the world — to understand the agreement before we can start voting."

Some players — including Capitals star Alex Ovechkin — went overseas during the lockout. The team welcomed Ovechkin, who played for his hometown Dynamo Moscow in the Kontinental Hockey League, back to Washington by posting a picture of him arriving at the airport on its Twitter account.

SALARY CAP: Under the new labor deal, teams will have the option of absorbing part of a player's salary to help facilitate trades, Pierre LeBrun of espn.com reported. Now a club can retain up to half of a player's cap hit and/or salary, similar to the cap system in other sports, including MLB.

Schedule likely to be 48 games 01/07/13 [Last modified: Tuesday, January 8, 2013 12:50am]
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