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Season that began in St. Pete ends with optimism for 2017

Team Penske driver Simon Pagenaud celebrates in victory lane after winning the Grand Prix of Sonoma on Sunday. He also clinched the IndyCar season championship.
AP

Team Penske driver Simon Pagenaud celebrates in victory lane after winning the Grand Prix of Sonoma on Sunday. He also clinched the IndyCar season championship. AP

It was the year of Roger Penske in IndyCar. No team came close to stopping Team Penske's march to the top of the standings.

When the checkered flag fell Sunday on the 2016 season, Penske drivers celebrated with their 10th victory of the year and a 1-2-3 finish in the final IndyCar standings. The last time a team swept the season standings was in 1994 by another Penske group: Al Unser Jr., Emerson Fittipaldi and Paul Tracy.

This trio of Simon Pagenaud, Will Power and Helio Castroneves couldn't be touched this season as the entire organization was determined to forget its failure a year ago while giving the boss the gift of an IndyCar championship in the 50th anniversary season of Team Penske.

"The numbers look great, for sure. It's very satisfying," said Pagenaud, who won his first championship in his sophomore season driving for Penske. "It's certainly a big year for us. Fifty-year anniversary, win for the team, winning myself, my name is always going to be there. It's great to be the little thing I am in such a big team with such history."

The dominance shown by the organization this year comes amid signs of promise for IndyCar's future.

Although the series continues to be dwarfed by NASCAR in television ratings, its viewership increased this season on NBC Sports Network. The 100th running of the Indianapolis 500 was sold out, and the series celebrated a new American winner that day in rookie Alexander Rossi.

Rossi didn't put together a magical season after his surprising 15 minutes of fame, and right up until he ran out of gas in the last corner of Sunday's season finale, he's been a mixed bag.

"It's weird how this sport works — we won the biggest race of the year the same way (on fuel)," Rossi said. "It's just the way it goes sometime. It's easier to look back at things that could have been different, but that's racing and I hope to show what I'm capable of in the future."

What his future holds, nobody knows.

Rossi could try to return to Formula One, where he's still seeking a role beyond reserve driver, or return to IndyCar. He entered the series in a partnership between Bryan Herta and Andretti Autosport, but was suddenly mentioned at Sonoma as a potential candidate to drive for Penske.

Penske has yet to commit to four cars next season, which puts Juan Pablo Montoya in a state of limbo. Montoya, who opened the season with a win in the Grand Prix of St. Petersburg, said he doesn't expect Penske to bring him back. Penske said planning is still ongoing and he'd like to have his lineup set in the next 60 days.

Many think Josef Newgarden, another budding American star, will be Montoya's replacement. The only thing that is certain, though, is that Newgarden will likely be the first domino to fall in what could be a frenzied offseason free agency that leads to new jobs for Montoya, Sebastien Bourdais, Tony Kanaan, Newgarden and others.

Meanwhile, Chip Ganassi has yet to announce a replacement sponsor for Target, which is leaving IndyCar after 27 seasons. Target's departure leaves four-time series champion Scott Dixon without a sponsor, but Ganassi has shown no signs of worry.

While the loss of Target could be seen as a blow to IndyCar's place in the sports marketing world, the series was bolstered this weekend by DHL Express renewing its sponsorship of Ryan Hunter-Reay through 2020 and Menards returning to the series in a significant sponsorship role with Pagenaud next season.

For John Menard, who spent years as both a team owner and sponsor in IndyCar before moving his focus to NASCAR and the career of his son, Paul, the return has been based on a sense of excitement around the series.

"I think IndyCar is on an upward trend now," Menard said.

The series will receive some much-needed offseason attention through James Hinchcliffe's participation in Dancing With The Stars. The Canadian has become a brand ambassador for IndyCar, and got the DWTS opportunity through appearances on Family Feud and The Steve Harvey Show.

Now IndyCar has gone all-in on marketing for Hinchcliffe's TV bit, and he's doing the same for the series.

"Doing Dancing With The Stars was to help spread the IndyCar message. That was honestly one of my reasons, bigger reasons, for doing it," he said. "I want to show people how cool this sport really is."

— Associated Press

Season that began in St. Pete ends with optimism for 2017 09/20/16 [Last modified: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 8:19pm]
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