Make us your home page
Instagram

Get the quickest, smartest news, analysis and photos from the Bucs game emailed to you shortly after the final whistle.

(View our Privacy Policy)

Here's why the U.S. and Germany won't play for a tie

United States' John Brooks, centre, celebrates after scoring his side's second goal during the group G World Cup soccer match between Ghana and the United States Monday at the Arena das Dunas in Natal, Brazil.  [AP photo]

United States' John Brooks, centre, celebrates after scoring his side's second goal during the group G World Cup soccer match between Ghana and the United States Monday at the Arena das Dunas in Natal, Brazil. [AP photo]

One simple question looms over today's United States-Germany Group G game: With both teams sitting on four points and Portugal and Ghana on one, why don't the Americans and Germans play at a crawl and produce a tie that would see both advance to the knockout stage?

First, the winner of this group avoids the Group H winner in the round of 16. That's likely to be young, highly regarded Belgium. And though the Belgians have not hit top form in this tournament, they're clearly better than whoever winds up second (Russia, South Korea or Algeria). Thus, the Group G winner figures to have an easier matchup.

Also, the Americans will get a psychological boost going forward if they knock off one of the world's soccer powers.

So why can't the Germans sit back and play for 0-0? Because they must know the United States has a habit of scoring late. The Americans have scored after the 80th minute in both World Cup games, including the winner against Ghana.

During qualifying, three late U.S. goals were winners and one, at Panama, came deep in stoppage time just seconds after the Americans tied it.

If today's game is tied in, say, the 88th minute and the Americans strike, the Germans will have little time left to earn a tie. And a loss might bring in tiebreaker scenarios for second place — though Ghana and, especially, Portugal are extraordinarily unlikely to make up the goal differential against Germany.

Late boomers

Between the World Cup and qualifying games, the United States has scored seven goals in the 80th minute or later since 2012. Teams that have produced at least that many:

Nation No. Gm.

Ghana 10 10

Mexico 10 21

Netherlands 9 13

Australia 9 17

Colombia 9 19

South Korea 8 16

Chile 8 19

Nigeria 7 11

Bosnia-Herz. 7 13

United States 7 18

Iran 7 19

Uruguay 7 21

Note: Games vary because of different qualifying procedures and not all teams have played three World Cup games

Here's why the U.S. and Germany won't play for a tie 06/25/14 [Last modified: Wednesday, June 25, 2014 11:19pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

© 2017 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...
  1. Back to .500, Rays feel ready to roll (w/video)

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG — Who wants to be mediocre? Middling? Average? Run-of-the-mill?

    Rays catcher Jesus Sucre tags out the Angels’ Mike Trout trying to score from second base after a perfect peg from rightfielder Steven Souza Jr. in the first inning.
  2. Rays journal: Steven Souza Jr. preserves shutout with perfect throw

    The Heater

    ST. PETERSBURG — The closest the Angels came to scoring off RHP Matt Andriese in Thursday's 4-0 Rays victory occurred in the first inning, when DH Mike Trout tried to score from second on a single to right. But the throw from RF Steven Souza Jr. was on the money, and Trout was out.

    "That …

    Colby Rasmus collects high fives and shoulder rubs after driving in all four of the Rays’ runs in their victory Thursday. Rasmus had two run-scoring hits a day after hitting a home run.
  3. Rays at Twins, 8:10 p.m. Friday, Minneapolis

    The Heater

    Tonight: at Twins

    8:10, Target Field, Minnesota

    TV/radio: Fox Sports Sun; 620-AM, 680-AM

    Probable pitchers

    Rays: RH Chris Archer (3-3, 3.76)

    PORT CHARLOTTE, FL - FEBRUARY 18:  Chris Archer #22 of the Tampa Bay Rays poses for a portrait during the Tampa Bay Rays photo day on February 18, 2017 at Charlotte Sports Park in Port Charlotte, Floida.  (Photo by Elsa/Getty Images)
  4. Roger Mooney's takeaways from Thursday's Rays-Angels game

    The Heater

    If you're walking, you're hitting, as the saying goes, so it's a good sign that RF Steven Souza Jr. reached base four times, with a hit by pitch, a single and two walks. Hitters feel they are coming out of slumps when they are walking, because they are seeing the ball better. That's good news for the Rays …

  5. Fennelly: Dirk Koetter's apology no way to keep this fidget spinning

    Bucs

    TAMPA — It all began with a fidget spinner.

    This tweet from the Bucs, mocking the Falcons' 28-3 lead they lost in the Super Bowl against the Falcons, prompted a public apology from head coach Dirk Koetter, who called it "unprofessional and not smart."