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Andy Murray rallies for spot in Wimbledon semifinals

Andy Murray completes his seventh career comeback from a two-set deficit and will face Jerzy Janowicz, the 24th seed, in Friday’s semifinal.

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Andy Murray completes his seventh career comeback from a two-set deficit and will face Jerzy Janowicz, the 24th seed, in Friday’s semifinal.

LONDON — They sighed when Andy Murray faulted.

They stood and roared when he hit winners.

And when Murray dropped the first two sets of his Wimbledon quarterfinal Wednesday, the 15,000 Centre Court spectators were suddenly so silent, birds could be heard chirping.

By the time his five-set comeback was nearly complete, more than two hours later, the fans were greeting each point that went Murray's way with celebrations of the sort normally reserved for a championship. It has been 77 years since a British man won the country's Grand Slam tournament, and thanks to the second-seeded Murray's 4-6, 3-6, 6-1, 6-4, 7-5 victory over 54th-ranked Fernando Verdasco, the locals still can hold out hope the wait will end Sunday.

First things first, of course. Murray, who is from Scotland, will play in the semifinals at the All England Club for the fifth consecutive year Friday, facing No. 24 Jerzy Janowicz. The other semifinal is No. 1 Novak Djokovic against No. 8 Juan Martin del Potro.

There is no doubt who will be the recipient of the most boisterous support.

"Great atmosphere at the end of the match. … I love it when it's like that. It was extremely noisy," said Murray, who lost last year's final to Roger Federer. "They were right into it, pretty much every single point."

Murray needed to summon some pretty strong tennis, and plenty of grit, for his seventh career victory after facing a two-set deficit. He never panicked — no matter what all his self-admonishing muttering and gesticulating looked like — and eventually figured out how to handle Verdasco's 130 mph serves and high-risk, high-reward style.

"When you play more and more matches, and gain more experience, you understand how to turn matches around and how to change the momentum of games," Murray said. "Maybe when I was younger, I could have lost that match. But I think I've learned how to come back from tough situations more as I got older."

The other quarterfinals lasted a mere three sets each, and the most compelling segments came at the beginning of 2009 U.S. Open champion del Potro's 6-2, 6-4, 7-6 (7-5) win against No. 4 David Ferrer and the very end of Janowicz's 7-5, 6-4, 6-4 victory over 130th-ranked Lukasz Kubot in the first Grand Slam match between men from Poland.

Janowicz, 22, reached his first major semifinal — and the first for a man from his country — by pounding serves at a tournament-high 140 mph, compiling 30 aces, and saving all six break points he faced. When the match was over, Kubot walked around the net to Janowicz's side and the pair of Davis Cup teammates and good pals warmly embraced. Then they yanked off their shirts and exchanged them, the way soccer players trade jerseys after games.

Janowicz sat in his sideline chair, covered his face and sobbed.

"It's not easy to control all of the feelings inside my body," he said. "I was never in (a major) quarterfinal before. I never had a chance to be in (the) semifinal of a Grand Slam. I never played against Lukasz before."

On the fifth point the 6-foot-6 del Potro played, his left foot slid out from under him as he sprinted to reach the ball. Del Potro's heavily wrapped left knee, which he hyperextended on a face-first tumble in the third round, slackened, then bent backward.

"Really painful," del Potro said. "I was scared."

He fell to the turf and rolled over twice, then stayed down until a trainer went out to check on him and dispense anti-inflammatory medicine.

"Magic pills," del Potro called them.

After a 10-minute break, he resumed playing — and playing quite well.

He hasn't lost a set en route to his first Wimbledon semifinal. Djokovic also has won all 15 sets he has played, including in a 7-6 (7-5), 6-4, 6-3 victory over No. 7 Tomas Berdych to reach a 13th consecutive Grand Slam semifinal, the second-longest streak in men's tennis history behind Roger Federer's 23.



Today's matches

Women's semis: Agnieszka Radwanska (4) vs. Sabine Lisicki (23); Marion Bartoli (15) vs. Kirsten Flipkens (20)

TV: 8 a.m., ESPN

Andy Murray rallies for spot in Wimbledon semifinals 07/03/13 [Last modified: Wednesday, July 3, 2013 11:15pm]

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