Tuesday, June 19, 2018

A school's grade depends on lots of factors

BY ELIZABETH BROWN-WORTHINGTON

Boca Ciega High

So your grades have slipped. What do you do? Improve your homework habits. Study harder. Listen better. Seek help. Change your attitude.

The remedies are not too different when a school's grade slips.

Michael Vigue, principal at Boca Ciega High, took the helm in October 2010, when Boca Ciega was a D-ranked school under the State of Florida's controversial grading system.

Boca Ciega's grade began to rise, and in 2013 the Gulfport school earned an A for the second time in two years. Under Vigue, the school's graduation rate also went from a 62 percent in 2011 to 85 percent in 2013.

So what happened to cause such a huge leap?

A lot of things are different, said Vigue, who on any given day can be seen helping students out of their cars, directing parking lot traffic and walking the halls to chat with students. One big change is that he worked, he said, to "try and instill attention to detail, and improve the communication between students and staff."

The school facility also went through some major renovations, which Vigue believes made the students feel better and gave them more confidence. "It's easier to learn when the air conditioning works and the classrooms are clean and up to date," said the principal who makes a point of knowing every student by name.

Vigue worked closely with his staff and assistant principals to tune-up the curriculum, too. They reviewed the courses that were offered and why they were offered, making sure they made sense.

Vigue and his staff improved remediation options, making it easier for students who needed to catch up in areas in which they were behind, and added in numerous college and career preparation paths. "If things don't make sense sequentially, it (the curriculum) won't make sense."

Vigue credits the help of many for the school's improvement, among them Scott Mason, the instructional staff developer, also referred to as the "multitiered system of supports specialist." Part of that job description includes for Mason checking up on individual students to get a personal reading of their progress. If grades are down, he said, he talks to them about what they can do to improve.

Mason began at Boca Ciega teaching earth science to mostly freshman. "I don't recall when I started here," he joked. "But I believe it was somewhere between the Cretaceous and Tertiary periods, among the last of the dinosaurs."

Florida's school grading system was not yet in place when Mason started teaching, but when it began in 1999, Boca Ciega was below the district and state high school average. Physically, the school was in bad shape as well. Most of the buildings had classrooms with doors to the outside, and there were always flooding issues when it rained.

In recent years, Mason said, he has also seen a big change in the culture of the student body. "Students seem to be more engaged in their school, with adults," he said. "They (the students) feel better about it and generally seem to take more responsibility in making it a good place." But Mason believes it was a partnership between the students and the staff that most improved the school.

"It all starts, and ends, where the rubber hits the road: in the classroom," he said. He's noticed that the teachers are working harder and longer to help students personalize their objectives. The staff works to make sure that the students can see how everything fits into the big picture, he said, and he has also observed that the students have responded accordingly.

School grades are based on a complicated series of measures. Test performance (FCAT and now end of course exams), counts for about half the grade. The other half includes such things as graduation rates, college readiness and participation in accelerated courses such as advanced placement, dual enrollment and industry certification classes.

Mason offers some tongue in cheek suggestions for other principals looking to imitate Boca Ciega's success: Step one: "Recruit our students." Step two: "Hire our teachers." Step three: Hire our administration, counselors and support staff." Steps four and five: "Rinse, and repeat."

Comments
Big Ten reaps recruiting bounty in Tampa Bay

Big Ten reaps recruiting bounty in Tampa Bay

Largo High defensive back Solomon Brown had plenty of college options with offers from 20 Division I-A schools. Still, the three-star recruit did not need to go through a prolonged process to figure out where he wanted to go.Two weeks ago, Brown comm...
Updated: 8 minutes ago
Fixing giant Pasco County sinkhole won’t mean a larger neighborhood lake

Fixing giant Pasco County sinkhole won’t mean a larger neighborhood lake

NEW PORT RICHEY – Pasco County is pulling the plug on the idea of connecting a giant sinkhole to a nearby lake in Land O’Lakes.Tuesday morning, commissioners, with little comment, agreed to abandon extending Lake Saxon within the Lake Padgett Estate...
Updated: 13 minutes ago
Florida Bankers Association recognizes Bill Klich with award

Florida Bankers Association recognizes Bill Klich with award

Former Tampa Bay banking executive Bill Klich was presented the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Florida Bankers Association last week at an annual meeting in Palm Coast.Klich, 73, has a strong reputation with more than four decades of commercial ...
Updated: 19 minutes ago
Skyway 10K returning in March 2019, renewed for 5 more years

Skyway 10K returning in March 2019, renewed for 5 more years

ST. PETERSBURG — After raising $560,000 for its inaugural run on March 4, St Petersburg’s Skyway 10K will be returning in 2019 and will have the support of governmental agencies for years to come, run organizers said Tuesday.The run, which had around...
Updated: 20 minutes ago
New Port Richey man faces sexual battery charges

New Port Richey man faces sexual battery charges

NEW PORT RICHEY — A New Port Richey man was arrested Monday and faces sexual battery charges after deputies said he sexually assaulted a 10-year-old girl.Jonathan Wells, 33, would take the victim into his bedroom and undress her, kiss her face and ne...
Updated: 25 minutes ago
St. Pete Pride calendar: Parties, art exhibits, the big parade and more events for Pride week

St. Pete Pride calendar: Parties, art exhibits, the big parade and more events for Pride week

Pride EventsInterfaith Pride WorshipImam Daaylee Abdullah, of the Mecca Institute in Washington DC, serves as guest speaker. Free. First Presbyterian Church St. Petersburg, 701 Beach Drive NE, St. Petersburg. (727) 822-2031. 7 p.m. Thursday.Open Mic ...
Updated: 28 minutes ago
So, how exactly did the Rays end up losing Monday?

So, how exactly did the Rays end up losing Monday?

The Rays lost Monday's game when Sergio Romo failed them in the ninth inning.Called on to protect what was whittled to a one-run lead from 4-0, Romo got off to a bad start, walking the first batter on four pitches and then allowing a single to the se...
Updated: 29 minutes ago
Candidates rush to fill void left by Murman’s withdrawal from District 7

Candidates rush to fill void left by Murman’s withdrawal from District 7

TAMPA – The chance to run for an open seat on the Hillsborough County Commission doesn't come along often.That might explain why there are now 10 wannabe commissioners vying for the countywide District 7 seat.Democrat Mark Nash became the ...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Trump defiant as border crisis escalates, prepares to lobby House GOP on immigration bills

Trump defiant as border crisis escalates, prepares to lobby House GOP on immigration bills

WASHINGTON - As he prepared to visit Capitol Hill, President Donald Trump on Tuesday continued to insist that Congress produce comprehensive immigration legislation, while anxious Republicans explored a narrower fix to the administration policy of se...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Emotions boil over as ‘zero tolerance’ policy overtakes Florida politics

Emotions boil over as ‘zero tolerance’ policy overtakes Florida politics

The raw emotion over the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" policy on immigration is sweeping across Florida, where a 1,000-bed shelter in Homestead is being used to house unaccompanied migrant children.READ MORE: This is the child immigration c...
Updated: 1 hour ago