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From the editor: That's water in my mason jar, not moonshine

Michelle Stark

The stranger outside of Starbucks glanced at me as I approached, like he had something to say. On my way out, he did.

"Is that water, or … something else? Because where I'm from, it'd be …"

"Moonshine?" I said.

He flashed me a grin. "Yeah, exactly, moonshine."

This wasn't my first encounter like this.

Ever since I took the idea from a clever colleague to start toting my drinking water in a giant mason jar, I've gotten odd looks. From colleagues. From baristas. From strangers. Most of them jokingly suggest it's moonshine. A few throw out "gin" or "vodka." As you can imagine, it gets more hilarious with every comment someone makes.

Mason jars, those molded glass jars with the screw top, were invented in the mid 1800s and were typically used to can and preserve food. Now, they're used for everything: as vases at Pinterest-influenced weddings, as cocktail cups in hipster bars. (Restaurateurs, this obsession is getting a bit annoying. Never again do I want to eat a cakey dessert out of a glass jar.)

My inclination to use them for thirst-quenching started with a quest for a glass drinking vessel. All of my plastic bottles broke, and I wanted a glass option that was affordable and large — we're talking 32 ounces or more. It wasn't easy to find something I felt was worth the inevitable $15 or $20 price tag.

Then, one day, a friend at work was drinking water out of a mason jar, and a big ol' "duh" smacked me in the face.

Mason jars! I had a ton of them at home, mostly waiting to be turned into home decor or filled with food and given as a crafty gift. I got my hands on a 32-ouncer. Sturdy, sealable and so far surprisingly shatter-resistant, my mason jar comes with me everywhere I go.

The best part?

It cost $1.99.

After a couple of months I'm happy to announce the infatuation is still going strong. I've even learned to laugh off the moonshine jokes.

Contact Michelle Stark at [email protected] or (727) 893-8829. Follow @mstark17.

From the editor: That's water in my mason jar, not moonshine 11/16/15 [Last modified: Monday, November 16, 2015 12:34pm]
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