Friday, June 22, 2018
Stage

Tampa Repertory gives proper respect to Arthur Miller’s ‘A View From the Bridge’

TAMPA — Arthur Miller’s 13th play, A View From the Bridge, may be set more than a half-century ago but couldn’t be more relevant today. It tackles America’s struggles around immigrant discrimination and gender identity with searing honesty.

Though it wasn’t a commercial hit when first produced in the mid-1950s, the emotionally volatile drama enjoyed several successful revivals, including a Tony-winning revamp on Broadway in 2016.

Miller came up with the title while imagining commuters traveling across the Brooklyn Bridge. He envisioned their impressions looking down on Red Hook, a working-class waterfront neighborhood. Fascinated by the disparity between perceptions and reality, he gathered true stories about the area. One involved a dock worker, shunned by his peers for turning in an undocumented immigrant.

It’s a timeless drama, expertly revived by Tampa Repertory Theatre artistic director C. David Frankel. The University of South Florida theater professor has his finger on the pulse of what’s on our minds while curating classics that contend with the challenges we still face today.

The dock worker anecdote inspired the tale about longshoreman Eddie Carbone (Ned Averill-Snell) and his family (Emilia Sargent, Hannah Anton). A distinguished narrator Alfieri (Michael Mahoney) guides us. Carbone takes in two Italian brothers (Nick Hoop and Nathan Jokela) and experiences distress when one, Rodolpho (Hoop), begins to court his adopted niece, Catherine (Anton). The exuberant, serenading young man is not conventionally masculine, adding to Carbone’s discomfort with the situation, which spirals into tragedy.

Frankel co-directs A View From the Bridge, delivering Miller’s visceral drama with authenticity and expert pacing. We’re treated to Miller’s knack for a gradual build of tension and, most of all, engaging, empathetic characters. Jo Averill-Snell’s lighting and Igor Santos’ exquisite music and Matt Cowley's background sounds create the perfect mood.

Kudos to co-director Megan Lamasney. With her assistance, we get another superb performance from Ned Averill-Snell, who may fetch an award for his turn as Carbone. Like Death of a Salesman’s Willy Loman, Carbone is a fallen hero, and Averill-Snell fleshes him out with the right amount of pathos, eliciting sympathy and disgust simultaneously, with a New York accent and blue-collar swagger.

The women in the cast, initially shortchanged in Miller’s original one-act version, give the rewrite its due. Anton conveys Catherine with the innocence of a sheltered young woman while showing grit and resolve. She’s no aw-shucks ingenue, and her shades come through in Anton’s performance.

Likewise with Sargent as Beatrice, a traditional Italian-American woman who deals with her husband’s inappropriate behavior, expressing outrage and maintaining loyalty, graciousness and composure. It takes an actor of Sargent’s caliber to convey this troubled matriarch.

Nick Hoop and Nathan Jokela as the Italian houseguests Marco and Rodolpho don’t disappoint. Though they look nothing alike, a casting quibble, they exhibit a convincing brotherly bond. Hoop is endearing as the lovesick Rodolpho, and Jokela poignantly portrays Marco with the homesickness of a struggling father. Their accents sounded a bit wonky from time to time, but serviceable enough to keep us locked in.

Mahoney speaks with a more accurate and understated Italian accent. He delivers the dignity and wisdom of an important attorney who’s called upon to settle neighborhood disputes.

It takes a crack cast and elegantly ascetic production to convey Miller’s uncompromising explorations of love, loyalty, betrayal and prejudice. Many questions, no easy answers. But they get us talking, and that’s what counts.

Comments
On stage this week: Freefall Theatre’s ‘The Musical of Musicals,’ Jay Pharoah

On stage this week: Freefall Theatre’s ‘The Musical of Musicals,’ Jay Pharoah

SENDUP: MUSICAL OF MUSICALSFive composers, a talented cast, choreography by Cheryl Lee and music directed by Michael Raabe — that’s Freefall Theatre’s recipe for a laugh-filled, season-ending summer musical, appropriately titled The Musical of Musica...
Published: 06/20/18
Jobsite’s ‘Dancing at Lughnasa’ should be more gripping than it is

Jobsite’s ‘Dancing at Lughnasa’ should be more gripping than it is

TAMPA — The virtues of Dancing at Lughnasa, with which Jobsite Theater closes its season, are many. This drama by the celebrated Brian Friel opened in 1990 to much acclaim. It captures a family’s joys and sadnesses, and the quickness with which one s...
Published: 06/19/18
Irish boxer brings his dream to St. Petersburg

Irish boxer brings his dream to St. Petersburg

ST. PETERSBURG — In his vision for this weekend, Connor Coyle is standing in the ring at the Coliseum, and the referee is raising his gloved fist.He’s got a National Boxing Association middleweight championship belt around his waist, the first of sev...
Published: 06/15/18
Irish boxer brings his dream to St. Petersburg

Irish boxer brings his dream to St. Petersburg

ST. PETERSBURG — In his vision for this weekend, Connor Coyle is standing in the ring at the Coliseum, and the referee is raising his gloved fist.He’s got a National Boxing Association middleweight championship belt around his waist, the first of sev...
Published: 06/14/18
Updated: 06/16/18
Why this ballet dancer is skipping college in favor of her own St. Petersburg Ballet Conservatory

Why this ballet dancer is skipping college in favor of her own St. Petersburg Ballet Conservatory

GULFPORT — Brianna Melton is as serious a ballet student as they come.By her junior year at St. Petersburg High’s International Baccalaureate program, she had already spent four summers training with ballet companies across the country and had narrow...
Published: 06/14/18
What’s on stage: The Illusionists, ‘Dancing at Lughnasa,’ G. David Howard

What’s on stage: The Illusionists, ‘Dancing at Lughnasa,’ G. David Howard

OPENING: DANCING AT LUGHNASAIrish playwright Brian Friel, who died in 2015 at 86, won’t be traveling anymore. But I’ll bet he packed a tidy suitcase. Dancing at Lughnasa, Jobsite Theater’s season closer, manages to address a lot of issues: race, reli...
Published: 06/13/18
Ruth Eckerd Hall tees up comedy, romance and Kristin Chenoweth for 2018-19 Broadway season

Ruth Eckerd Hall tees up comedy, romance and Kristin Chenoweth for 2018-19 Broadway season

Ruth Eckerd Hall rolls out a new lineup of musicals for its 2018-19 season, a mix of comedy, favorite musicals and romance."For the last 35 years, Broadway has always been a staple at Ruth Eckerd Hall," chief executive officer Zev Buffman said in a p...
Published: 06/12/18
A tense night at the Tony Awards ends in euphoria for Largo doctor Jeffrey Grove

A tense night at the Tony Awards ends in euphoria for Largo doctor Jeffrey Grove

Dr. Jeffrey Grove sat three-quarters of the way back from the stage at Radio City Music Hall, waiting for his moment. The Largo physician made the trip with family to New York for Sunday’s Tony Awards, where he hoped to see his investment in O...
Published: 06/11/18
Neal Boyd, ‘America’s Got Talent’ winner, dies at 42

Neal Boyd, ‘America’s Got Talent’ winner, dies at 42

SIKESTON, Mo. — Neal Boyd, an opera singer who won America’s Got Talent and dabbled in Missouri politics, has died. Scott County Coroner Scott Amick says Boyd died around 6 p.m. Sunday at his mother’s house in Sikeston. He was 42. Amick says Boyd had...
Published: 06/11/18
Parkland drama teens bring down the house with stirring performance at Tony Awards

Parkland drama teens bring down the house with stirring performance at Tony Awards

Members of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School’s drama team stole the show at the 72nd Annual Tony Awards Sunday night.The performance brought the crowd— many of whom were wiping tears from their eyes— to its collective feet at the Radio City Music ...
Published: 06/11/18