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2167544 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2014-02-26 22:24:39.0 UTC 2014-02-26T17:24:39.000-05:00 florida-orchestra-lends-sound-to-charlie-chaplins-the-gold-rush published 2014-02-27 00:48:02.0 UTC 2014-02-26T19:48:02.000-05:00 things-to-do/stage DTI 117550356 In one scene from The Gold Rush, Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp sticks some forks in dinner rolls and makes the bread dance. Part of why the table ballet plays so well on screen is the skippy song that accompanies each carb de coté. The timing has to be just right, which is way harder than it sounds live. It's a challenge that an intimate chamber of 15 musicians from the Florida Orchestra will tackle by playing a live soundtrack to Chaplin's film Friday at the Tampa Theatre and Saturday at the Palladium. In the movie, Chaplin's Little Tramp goes looking for some gold (and maybe some love). The movie came out in 1925, but the orchestra concert celebrates the 100th anniversary of Chaplin's famous vagrant character, which debuted in February 1914. Most people know about Chaplin's movies, his hat and mustache and shoes. But not everyone knows that he had a deep love for music. When he was a boy, he met two street musicians who changed his life. "He heard the song The Honeysuckle and the Bee," said Anne Keady, a Chaplin fan from Spring Hill who runs several websites devoted to him. "He said the music enraptured him. And it was really the first time beauty entered his soul." Chaplin was untrained but had sensibilities passed down from his musician father. He played by ear, humming or plunking the piano while an arranger figured out the notes. He re-released The Gold Rush in 1942 with an original score, attempting to keep up with audiences as sound in movies became the norm. His music had to be different than the typical zany sounds of the silent era. "He didn't want his music competing with his character," said Keady. "A lot of the sound effects they were using were these corny ones. ... He was involved in every aspect. A lot of times, he frustrated the musicians. They thought one way and all he knew was the sound he had in his head, and that's the sound he wanted." Orchestras around the country are a bit like Chaplin, trying to reach new audiences. Movie-music marriages are a part of that shift. In its 2014-2015 season, the Florida Orchestra will perform to flicks including Singing in the Rain and animated Pixar clips. "With contemporary films, you get click tracks, which keep the orchestra in line with the movie," said Ernest Richardson, guest conductor for the performances. With a Charlie Chaplin film? "You have nothing. You have to memorize the score and the way it fits in with the movie." Richardson, resident conductor with the Omaha Symphony, led a live performance of The Gold Rush back home. He practiced with the movie and the sound rolling at the same time, then turned off the video to totally feel the music. To nail the pratfalls, the orchestra will add sleigh bells, temple blocks, wooden spoons, a glockenspiel and a Lion's Roar, a drum head with a cord pulled through it to make a sound just like the name. All told, Richardson said, the result is pretty special. "It's such a beautifully crafted picture and the sound track is the other character that really provides the emotional context of what you're seeing," he said. "There are amazing moments in there." Stephanie Hayes can be reached at shayes@tampabay.com or (727) 893-8716. By Stephanie Hayes, Times Staff Writer things-to-do, stage, top-news Florida Orchestra lends sound to Charlie Chaplin's 'The Gold Rush' SHAYESN 4STB Main A soundtrack for silence <p><b>.</b><b>if you go</b></p><p>The Florida Orchestra presents Charlie Chaplin's <i>The Gold Rush </i>at 8 p.m. Friday at the Tampa Theatre in Tampa and 8 p.m. Saturday at the Palladium in St. Petersburg. $35, (727) 892-3337 or 1-800-662-7286; floridaorchestra.org.</p> 2 etc_Chaplin022714 A soundtrack for silence 2014-02-27 05:00:00.0 UTC 2014-02-27T00:00:00.000-05:00 1 Charlie Chaplin&#8217;s Little Tramp character in his 1925 movie, The Gold Rush. /resources/images/dti/2014/02/goldrush_12649330.jpg moviestillsdb.com /resources/images/dti/rendered/2014/02/goldrush_12649330_4col.jpg/resources/images/dti/rendered/2014/02/goldrush_12649330_8col.jpg Florida Orchestra, charlie chaplin, little tramp, the gold rush true templatedata/tampabaytimes/StaffArticle/data/2014/02/26/117550356-florida-orchestra-lends-sound-to-charlie-chaplins-the-gold-rush StaffArticle things-to-do,stageStageIn one scene from The Gold Rush, Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp sticks some forks in dinner rolls and makes the bread dance. Part of why the table ballet plays so well on screen is the skippy song that accompanies each carb de coté.Florida Orchestra, charlie chaplin, little tramp, the gold rushStephanie Hayes 380213 2038-01-18 05:00:00.0 UTC 2038-01-18T00:00:00.000-05:00 2012-10-25 12:32:28.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:32:28.000-04:00 stephanie-hayes published Stephanie Hayes <p>Stephanie Hayes is the arts and entertainment editor for the <i>Tampa Bay Times</i>, directing features coverage and the <i>Times</i>' staff of critics. Previously, she was performing arts critic, covering plays, musicals, classical music, dance, comedy and more. She also blogs about fashion for the <i>Times</i>' style blog, <a href="http://www.tampabay.com/blogs/divas">Deal Divas</a>She started writing for the <i>Times</i> in 2003, covering everything from suburban politics to zoning to snack foods to Britney Spears. She wrote the <i>Times</i>' feature obituary column, Epilogue, and went on to work as a general assignment reporter, entertainment reporter and higher education reporter. She grew up near Cleveland and graduated from St. Petersburg College and the University of South Florida.</p> Times Arts and Entertainment Editor writers DTI 33744881 Stephanie Hayes is the arts and entertainment editor for the Tampa Bay Times, directing features coverage and the Times' staff of critics. Previously, she was performing arts critic, covering plays, musicals, classical music, dance, comedy and more. She also blogs about fashion for the Times' style blog, Deal DivasShe started writing for the Times in 2003, covering everything from suburban politics to zoning to snack foods to Britney Spears. She wrote the Times' feature obituary column, Epilogue, and went on to work as a general assignment reporter, entertainment reporter and higher education reporter. She grew up near Cleveland and graduated from St. Petersburg College and the University of South Florida. <p>Phone: (727) 893-8716</p><p>Email: <a href="mailto:shayes@tampabay.com ">shayes@tampabay.com</a></p><p>Twitter: <a href=" http://twitter.com/stephhayes">@StephHayes</a></p><p>Blog: <a href="http://www.tampabay.com/blogs/divas">Deal Divas</a></p> 1 Stephanie Hayes column sig /resources/images/dti/2016/06/Hayes_Stephanie_web_17341938.jpg EVE EDELHEIT | Times true templatedata/tampabaytimes/AuthorProfile/data/33744881-stephanie-hayes AuthorProfile 2012-10-25 12:32:28.0 UTC 2012-10-25T08:32:28.000-04:00 <span style="display:none;" class="author vcard"><span class="fn">STEPHANIE HAYES</span></span><span style="display:none;" class="source-org vcard"><span class="org fn">Tampa Bay Times</span></span><a rel="item-license" href="/universal/user_agreement.shtml">&#169; 2016 Tampa Bay Times</a><br /><br />Times Staff Writer 2261880 2016-01-19 19:08:10.0 UTC 7 Months Ago florida-orchestra-makes-music-from-donkey-jawbones-and-beer-kegs things-to-do/stage Florida Orchestra makes music from donkey jawbones and beer kegs StaffArticle 2270181 2016-03-21 16:05:35.0 UTC 5 Months Ago florida-orchestra-to-visit-communities-around-state-in-first-residency things-to-do/stage Florida Orchestra to visit communities around state in first 'residency' outreach StaffArticle 2260666 2016-01-09 17:54:42.0 UTC 7 Months Ago cellist-maximilian-hornung-shines-as-florida-orchestra-celebrates-the-waltz things-to-do/stage Cellist Maximilian Hornung shines as Florida Orchestra celebrates the waltz StaffArticle <p>In one scene from <i>The Gold Rush,</i> Charlie Chaplin's Little Tramp sticks some forks in dinner rolls and makes the bread dance. Part of why the table ballet plays so well on screen is the skippy song that accompanies each carb de cot&eacute;.</p> <p>The timing has to be just right, which is way harder than it sounds live. It's a challenge that an intimate chamber of 15 musicians from the Florida Orchestra will tackle by playing a live soundtrack to Chaplin's film Friday at the Tampa Theatre and Saturday at the Palladium.</p> <p>In the movie, Chaplin's Little Tramp goes looking for some gold (and maybe some love). The movie came out in 1925, but the orchestra concert celebrates the 100th anniversary of Chaplin's famous vagrant character, which debuted in February 1914.</p> <p>Most people know about Chaplin's movies, his hat and mustache and shoes. But not everyone knows that he had a deep love for music. When he was a boy, he met two street musicians who changed his life.</p> <p>&quot;He heard the song <i>The</i> <i>Honeysuckle and the Bee</i>,&quot; said Anne Keady, a Chaplin fan from Spring Hill who runs several websites devoted to him. &quot;He said the music enraptured him. And it was really the first time beauty entered his soul.&quot;</p> <p>Chaplin was untrained but had sensibilities passed down from his musician father. He played by ear, humming or plunking the piano while an arranger figured out the notes.</p> <p>He re-released <i>The Gold Rush</i> in 1942 with an original score, attempting to keep up with audiences as sound in movies became the norm. His music had to be different than the typical zany sounds of the silent era.</p> <p>&quot;He didn't want his music competing with his character,&quot; said Keady. &quot;A lot of the sound effects they were using were these corny ones. ... He was involved in every aspect. A lot of times, he frustrated the musicians. They thought one way and all he knew was the sound he had in his head, and that's the sound he wanted.&quot;</p> <p>Orchestras around the country are a bit like Chaplin, trying to reach new audiences. Movie-music marriages are a part of that shift. In its 2014-2015 season, the Florida Orchestra will perform to flicks including <i>Singing in the Rain</i> and animated Pixar clips.</p> <p>&quot;With contemporary films, you get click tracks, which keep the orchestra in line with the movie,&quot; said Ernest Richardson, guest conductor for the performances.</p> <p>With a Charlie Chaplin film? </p> <p>&quot;You have nothing. You have to memorize the score and the way it fits in with the movie.&quot;</p> <p>Richardson, resident conductor with the Omaha Symphony, led a live performance of <i>The Gold Rush</i> back home. He practiced with the movie and the sound rolling at the same time, then turned off the video to totally feel the music.</p> <p>To nail the pratfalls, the orchestra will add sleigh bells, temple blocks, wooden spoons, a glockenspiel and a Lion's Roar, a drum head with a cord pulled through it to make a sound just like the name.</p> <p>All told, Richardson said, the result is pretty special.</p> <p>&quot;It's such a beautifully crafted picture and the sound track is the other character that really provides the emotional context of what you're seeing,&quot; he said. &quot;There are amazing moments in there.&quot;</p> <p><i>Stephanie Hayes can be reached at shayes@tampabay.com or (727) 893-8716. </i></p>trueruntime2016-08-30 05:59:28