Tuesday, April 24, 2018
Arts

Art planner: Classical guitars bring joyful noises to MFA, John Kiley's glass are balancing acts at Chihuly Collection

 

JOYFUL NOISES: NEW SHOWS AT MFA

 

The big show opening Saturday at the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, is a group of portraits from the 18th to early 20th centuries. Two others are also worth a good look. And though they're visual, sound is an equal component in both.

The Art of the Classical Guitar showcases a collection of acoustic guitars crafted by world-famous luthiers (stringed instrument makers) including Antonio de Torres and Hermann Hauser. Torres is considered the father of the modern classical guitar (also known as a Spanish guitar) and Hauser was a great luthier of the 20th century. A nice touch: Recordings let viewers experience their tones. Go to fine-arts.org for related musical events.

Christian Marclay has long enjoyed an esteemed reputation in the art world but public popularity came with his 2010 video The Clock, which won the Venice International Film Festival's highest award. It is a 24-hour montage of moments from movies that refer to each hour in a day. The Telephone, an earlier video (1995) with related content, is being screened continuously at the museum. Also using movie clips, Marclay collages telephones, phone booths and movie stars answering rings. It's very entertaining. Also on view are photogravures Marclay made at Graphicstudio. Sound Holes (2007) is a series of prints of entry phones and call boxes.

The museum, 255 Beach Drive NE, St. Petersburg, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday with extended hours to 8 p.m. Thursday, and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $17 adults, $15 seniors, $10 students 7 and older including college students with ID. fine-arts.org. (727) 896-2667.

 

GLASS ACT: JOHN KILEY AT CHIHULY COLLECTION

 

Dale Chihuly's spectacular glass vessels and installations are the stars at the Morean Arts Center's Chihuly Collection, 400 Beach Drive NE, St. Petersburg, but the studio glass movement has many other stars in its firmament — albeit not as famous as Chihuly — and for several years, space has been dedicated to showcasing them.

Opening Friday is "John Kiley: Luminosity." His glass sculptures are amazing balancing acts of form and color and literally seem precariously balanced. He shared his earliest inspiration in a recent statement, writing that as a child he made a sphere of mud and after it dried, he cracked it open.

"The glass sculptures that I make are an effort to recreate this experience. Openings allow the viewer to peer through the sculptures where the distinct colored sections are fused together to become one," he said. "The fragility of glass allows a tension to exist between viewer, sculpture and sculptor, hopefully creating a sense of concern for objects that may be considered simultaneously strong yet precarious, beautiful yet breakable."

Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $14.95 adults, $13.95 seniors and $10.95 students. moreanartscenter.org. (727) 896-4527.

More Morean news: In addition to the Chihuly Collection the arts center also owns the Morean Center for Clay, 420 22nd St. S. In conjunction with the Second Saturday ArtWalk, the Center for Clay launches a group show Saturday featuring eight leading ceramic artists from throughout the United States: Jen Allen, Ben Carter, Adam Field, Steven Godfrey, Nick Joerling, Heesoo Lee, Karl Radasch and Deb Schwartzkopf. The show is free.

 

COMING TO KOKOL GALLERY: KEIJI SHINOHARA

 

The woodblock print is steeped in history and tradition, dating back centuries from its origin in Asia. Keiji Shinohara is a master printer in the genre and his work will be on view at Kokol Art Studio and Gallery, 3318 W Bay to Bay Blvd., Tampa, beginning Friday with a free reception from 5 to 9 p.m. He's part of a group show that includes gallery owner Beth Kokol, who studied with him at the prestigious Penland School of Crafts. Shinohara will also give a free talk on Saturday at 11 a.m. And if you can't afford one of his works, take heart. The U.S. Postal Service will soon use one of his images on a stamp we can all afford. For more information about workshops, go to bethkokolarts.com.

     
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