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Martha Beneduci ran the Hudson Shrimp Docks for 18 years before giving it up when her husband, Al, died. She still owns the Capt. Al, the boat she and her husband were on the night of the no-name storm.BRENDAN FITTERER | Times

Swimming against the storm to save a fleet

HUDSON --The water level at the shrimp docks had risen to Martha Beneduci's neck. Saltwater whipped by 50-mph winds stung her face. A powerful storm had pushed massive amounts of water into the coast. The docks had become a lake swelling into the streets and homes of this Pasco County fishing community. Beneduci sa …

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No-name storm forced changes in insurance, preparation

Floridians know storms on a first-name basis: Andrew. Charley. Opal. Wilma. Those hurricanes still haunt our collective consciousness, reminders of danger, destruction and death. But i …

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Modern forecasting got start with 1993 no-name storm

Even on the clattering low-tech machines we used 20 years ago, it was clear this was no ordinary spring storm. It was March 1993, and I was chief meteorologist at the NBC station in Austin, …

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Scenes from the 1993 No-Name Storm

They called it the “No-Name Storm’’ because in March 1993 only hurricanes got names. By the time its effects were measured, it earned the moniker “Storm of the Century.’’ It drowned more people than hurricanes Hugo and Andrew combined.

    

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  1. Tropical Depression Two forms in the Atlantic (w/map)

    Hurricanes

    A tropical storm warning has been issued for the South Carolina coast after forecasters say the second tropical cyclone of the Atlantic season formed.

  2. Hurricane forecast: Near-normal season for Atlantic, but with some uncertainty

    Hurricanes

    The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season is expected to be near normal, forecasters announced Friday, although they say uncertain climatic conditions will make predicting the number or severity of storms more difficult.

    Craig Fugate, Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), right, talks about the status of Hurricane Joaquin as it moves through the eastern Bahamas along Rick Knabb, Director of the National Hurricane Center, left, in October. The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season is expected to be near normal, forecasters announced, although they say uncertain climatic conditions will make predicting the number or severity of storms more difficult. [Associated Press]
  3. Forecast: Warm with 100 percent chance of a long weekend

    Weather

    Happy Memorial Day weekend!

    The weather for the holiday is shaping up to be warm and humid, with a small rain chance over the next few days, according to 10Weather WTSP meteorologists.

  4. More severe weather and tornadoes roil Plains; no injuries (w/video)

    Weather

    CHAPMAN, Kan. — Severe weather spawning numerous tornadoes roiled large stretches of Kansas for a second day Thursday, prompting residents to anxiously watch the skies but causing only scattered damage in rural areas and no injuries or deaths.

    A tornado drops 2 miles northeast of Niles, Kan., on Wednesday. The National Weather Service said it was on the ground for about 90 minutes and damaged or destroyed about 20 homes.
  5. Forecasters give Atlantic system a 70 percent chance of becoming a tropical storm (w/map)

    Hurricanes

    National Hurricane Center forecasters said Thursday morning that an area of low pressure over the Atlantic Ocean had a 60 percent chance of growing into a tropical storm by the weekend — and a 70 percent chance over the next five days.

  6. A warm and unusually dry work week ahead

    Weather

    The last work week before the start of hurricane season will be warm and unusually dry.

  7. Forecast: Muggy heat will stay through Saturday

    Weather

    The oppressive mugginess is here to stay. At least through Saturday.

  8. Whoa! Video shows 109-mph wind tossing man on Mount Washington

    Weather

    MOUNT WASHINGTON, N.H. — Winter has been over with for nearly two months, but you wouldn't know it from recent conditions at the tallest peak in the Northeast.