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Going green

  1. Epilogue: M.C. Davis ducked the limelight while saving as much nature as he could

    Environment

    M.C. Davis was a gambler, a hard-nosed businessman, a guy determined to get his way — and a man who swooned over Florida nature.

  2. Water sports enthusiasts win: City recommends removal of no-wake zones in Indian Rocks Beach

    Wildlife

    INDIAN ROCKS BEACH — Score one for the water sports crowd.

    And a crowd it was.

    Residents in “Friends of IRB” T-shirts showed up to protest no-wake zones at Indian Rocks Beach City Hall last week. Many speakers were children who argued a ban gives them boring days.
  3. Tainted water brings health warnings for two Pasco beaches

    Environment

    A Labor Day weekend visit to two west Pasco beaches is going to be accompanied by a warning to stay out of the water.

  4. County mulls acquisition of sensitive Rocky Creek property along coast

    Environment

    More than three decades ago, an Odessa couple wanted to take gulf-front property they owned and save it as a public park. If Pasco commissioners concur, the county plans to do just that by buying the island for $3.1 million.

    Failed housing development, due to a declining real estate market, on the Rocky Creek land along the coast allowed the Pasco County Commission to add the 65 acres to a project list in 2009. Now, commissioners may buy the land with proceeds from the original Penny for Pasco sales tax to turn it into a public park preserve.
  5. North America's tallest mountain has new name — and height (w/video)

    Environment

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska — North America's tallest mountain doesn't just have a new name. It also has a new elevation.

  6. State wildlife com­mis­sion discussing new policies toward bears, panthers

    Wildlife

    Bears in the crosshairs and panthers pouncing on livestock are hot topics on the agenda today as the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission opens a two-day meeting in Fort Lauderdale.

    Seen here in May of 2014, a black bear perches on a tree in Panama City, Fla. For the first time since 1994, bear hunting is legal in Florida, thanks to a June vote by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Today the board will consider how many bears can be killed during the one-week hunting season in October.
  7. Authorities clean up diesel fuel spill in Intracoastal Waterway

    Environment

    BELLEAIR — Authorities have collected most of the diesel fuel that seeped into the Intracoastal Waterway Monday afternoon after a tanker truck malfunctioned, the state's Department of Environmental Protection said Tuesday.

  8. Everglades National Park to restrict motorized boating, make other changes

    Wetlands

    FORT LAUDERDALE — Everglades National Park plans to restrict motorized boating on Florida Bay, designate additional land as wilderness and make the park more accessible to visitors as part of the first overhaul of its management plan in more than 30 years.

    Rain clouds are seen over the Florida Everglades. Everglades National Park plans to restrict motorized boating on Florida Bay, designate additional land as wilderness and make the park more accessible to visitors as part of the first overhaul of its management plan in more than 30 years.[Getty Images (2011)]
  9. Uncertain future for St. Petersburg's sewage plant next to Albert Whitted

    Water

    ST. PETERSBURG — When the city pumped more than 16 million gallons of untreated or partially treated sewage into Tampa and Boca Ciega bays this month, it thrust a coveted piece of waterfront property back into the public eye.

  10. General Mills sets ambitious goal for greenhouse gas cuts

    Global Warming

    GOLDEN VALLEY, Minn. — General Mills has set an ambitious goal of reducing its greenhouse gas emissions 28 percent by 2025 — not just within its own operations but from farm to fork to landfill.

    General Mills CEO Ken Powell talks about his company's plans for reducing greenhouse gases in Golden Valley, Minn. The company's goal is reducing its greenhouse gas emissions 28 percent by 2025, not just within its own operations but all the way up its supply chain from suppliers. [JIM MONE | Associated Press]