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Going green

  1. Burmese python bagged in Everglades measures 18 feet, 3 inches and 133 pounds

    Wildlife

    A massive python slithering along the tram road at Shark Valley in Everglades National Park may be one for the record books.

    University of Florida researchers captured this female Burmese python, measuring 18 feet, 3 inches, and weighing 133 pounds, while tracking invasive species at Shark Valley in Everglades National Park on July 9.[U.S. Geological Survey]
  2. Injured John's Pass dolphin Babyface improves swimmingly

    Wildlife

    Babyface the dolphin isn't in the clear, but signs are promising that the deep propeller gashes on her back and tail will continue to heal, officials said.

    Babyface, a female bottlenose dolphin that suffered deep propeller injuries, has show improvement while swimming around John's Pass. [Photo: Clearwater Marine Aquarium]
  3. Dentist accused in Cecil the lion's death says he thought hunt was legal

    Wildlife

    ST. PAUL, Minn. — An American dentist who admitted he killed a well-known lion this month in Zimbabwe and planned to mount the head kept his office closed Wednesday as the furor against him online has turned vitriolic and, at times, threatening.

    A website, cecilthelion.org, was created to tell the story of Cecil and to solicit donations. [Screengrab from cecilthelion.org]
  4. Gallery: More than 600 baby sea turtles released into ocean

    Wildlife

    BOCA RATON— It was a turtle emancipation.

    A green turtle is held as marine turtle specialists prepare to release more than 570 baby sea turtles into the Atlantic Ocean in a joint effort between the Coast Guard and the Gumbo-Limbo Nature Center on July 27, 2015 in Boca Raton. The sea turtles hatchlings come from turtle nests located along beaches throughout Florida, which are the primary nesting grounds for Loggerhead sea turtles. [Getty Images]
  5. Sockeye salmon dying from heat in Columbia River

    Wildlife

    Perishing population

    Sockeye salmon dying from heat in Columbia River

  6. Gov. Rick Scott as environmental champion? Yes, says foundation headed by developer

    Environment

    Gov. Rick Scott, whose administration has pushed to open the parks to cattle grazing and timber harvesting, offered polluters ways to get out of fines and sharply cut back staffing and regulations designed to protect Florida's natural resources, is getting an award for being a friend to the environment.

    This year the Fish and Wildlife Foundation of Florida is giving its annual conservation award to Gov. Rick Scott and his wife, Ann. The foundation executive director, Brett Boston, said the award had no name. In 2013, though, when Boston, left, presented the trophy to Bass Pro Shop founder Johnny Morris, the award had a name: the BlueGreen Award for Conservation Leadership in Florida. [Bass Pro Shops]
  7. New hunt for oil in Florida raises environmental concerns

    Wetlands

    MIAMI — Renewed hunts for oil in sensitive Florida ecosystems have environmental groups raising questions about the state's regulation of the oil and gas industry.

    An oil pump sits on Pad 2 in the Racoon Point Oil Field in Big Cypress National Preserve. Renewed hunts for oil in Florida’s sensitive ecosystems have environ-mental groups raising  questions about the state’s regulation of the oil and gas industry.
  8. Maine fisherman finds bright orange lobster; his 2nd rarity

    Wildlife

    RAYMOND, Maine — A Maine lobsterman has caught a rare bright orange lobster, the second time he's pulled an odd-colored crustacean from state waters.

    A rare bright orange lobster shares the tank with regular lobsters at the Fishermens Catch Seafood restaurant in Raymond, Maine, on Thursday. Bill Coppersmith, of Windham, Maine, caught the crustacean on Wednesday. Robert Bayer, executive director of The Lobster Institute at the University of Maine, says the odds of catching an orange lobster are one in several million. Coppersmith caught a white lobster in 1997; a one-in-100 million catch. [Associated Press]
  9. St. Louis developers buying Raytheon site in St. Petersburg

    Environment

    ST. PETERSBURG — After at least seven years on the market, lawsuits, angry neighbors and a toxic plume, the long-vacant Raytheon facility is about to get new life.

  10. Babyface the dolphin improving after suffering deep propeller cuts in John's Pass

    Wildlife

    MADEIRA BEACH — There's cautiously good news about the injured bottlenose dolphin swimming around John's Pass with a badly lacerated back: Babyface seems to be improving.

    Babyface, a female bottlenose dolphin that suffered deep propeller injuries, has show improvement while swimming around John's Pass. [Photo: Clearwater Marine Aquarium]