Angie Drobnic Holan, Times Staff Writer

Angie Drobnic Holan

Angie Drobnic Holan is deputy editor of PolitiFact and the editor of PolitiFact Florida. She previously was a reporter and researcher and was a member of the team that won the Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of the 2008 election. She has been with the Times since 2005.

Phone: (727) 893-8573

Email: holan@politifact.com

Blog: Florida politics

Twitter: @AngieHolan

  1. Fact-checking the March 9 news shows

    National

    The pundits and politicians had more questions than answers Sunday morning about Malaysian Airlines Flight 370, which disappeared on Saturday with 239 people on board.

    Two passengers on the flight were traveling from Malaysia to Beijing with stolen passports, but aviation experts wondered if that indicated illegal immigration rather than a terror attack. Evidence was frustratingly slim, and authorities and journalists warned people not to draw conclusions too soon....

  2. PolitiFact: Debt vs. deficit: What's the difference?

    National

    What word starts with "d" and ends with "t" and has to do with the federal budget?

    You'd be right if you said "debt." You'd also be right if you said "deficit." But while the two words sound the same, they describe very different concepts. One is getting bigger, while the other is getting smaller. The politicians and talking heads don't make things easier by confusing the two.

    It's a mistake we're seeing more often, especially from Democrats who want to defend President Barack Obama's fiscal policies....

  3. Fact-checking Obama 500 times

    Perspective

    It was 2007 when a young senator from Illinois arrived on the national scene and launched a campaign for president. By coincidence, that's the same year PolitiFact launched. We've been fact-checking the man who became President Barack Obama ever since.

    Last week, we published our 500th fact-check on Obama.

    No. 500 is Obama's statement in a recent radio address that the United States generates "more natural gas than anybody" thanks in part to his administration's "all-of-the-above" energy strategy....

  4. Who's who? And who's true?

    Perspective

    We suspected that President Barack Obama was the most fact-checked person on the Truth-O-Meter, but we confirmed it when we compiled data to mark the 500th time we've fact-checked him.

    Curious about who else has been fact-checked most often? We were, too. So we created a list of the Top 10 most fact-checked people on the Truth-O-Meter, which includes our state affiliates. Numbers are accurate as of Wednesday....

  5. Review: 'Longbourn' looks behind the pretty surfaces of 'Pride and Prejudice'

    Books

    Pride and Prejudice has such ardent fans today because it's a 19th century novel that's deliciously modern. There's a great romance between the vivacious Elizabeth Bennet and the brooding Mr. Darcy, but there's also intricate maneuvering for wealth and social status. The people in Jane Austen's world are on a quest for love, money or both, and they won't be stopped. Who can't understand that?...

  6. PolitiFact's Lie of the Year: Obama's 'you can keep it' claim about health care plans

    National

    It was a catchy political pitch and a chance to calm nerves about his dramatic and complicated plan to bring historic change to America's health insurance system.

    "If you like your health care plan, you can keep it," President Barack Obama said — many times — of his landmark new law.

    But the promise was impossible to keep.

    So this fall, as cancellation letters were going out to about 4 million Americans, the public realized Obama's breezy assurances were wrong....

    President Barack Obama speaks about his signature health care law in November. He bowed to pressure on existing health insurance policies that had been canceled.
  7. Charlie Crist on the Truth-O-Meter (and the Flip-O-Meter!)

    Blog

    PolitiFact Florida looks back at some of its most notable fact-checks on former Gov. Charlie Crist, now a Democratic candidate for governor. We looked at Crist's claims on education, voting rights and the stimulus, and we've looked at attacks against him about the state budget and abortion. We've also looked at two of Crist's notable changes in position, on his political party and on his support for gay marriage. Story here....

  8. Fact-checking Rubio on health care, shutdown votes

    Blog

    While Sen. Marco Rubio has made the media rounds this week, he hasn’t always been accurate.

    "On this very day in Florida, it was announced that 300,000 people are going to lose their individual coverage because of Obamacare,” Rubio said on The O’Reilly Factor. “Now those people next year, they don’t have health insurance. They are going to owe the IRS money in the form of a fine. Where are they supposed to go now and buy that health insurance if the website isn’t working, if Consumer Reports is telling people to avoid the website?"...

  9. As Oct. 1 approaches, answers to more questions about Obamacare

    Health

    Third in a series

    The Obamacare marketplaces open for business Tuesday to start selling health insurance to people who don't have coverage through their work, Medicare or Medicaid. We've been answering our readers' most common questions about the marketplace; you can find these answers at www.tampabay.com/health.

    Today, we dig into more issues, from subsidies to COBRA. Please keep sending your questions to sutton@tampabay.com....

  10. PolitiFact: The top 16 myths about Obamacare

    National

    PolitiFact has been fact-checking claims about the federal health care law since lawmakers started drafting the legislation in 2009. Long controversial, the law has been no stranger to attacks by detractors. Here are 16 of the biggest falsehoods PolitiFact has rated, because 10 isn't enough to capture all the exaggerations:

    The health care law rations care like systems in Canada and Great Britain....

  11. Reader questions on Obamacare, Part 3: COBRA and more

    Health

    Third in a series

    The Obamacare marketplaces open for business Tuesday to start selling health insurance to people who don't have coverage through their work, Medicare or Medicaid. We've been answering our readers' most common questions about the marketplace; you can find these answers at www.tampabay.com/health.

    Today, we dig into more issues, from subsidies to COBRA. Please keep sending your questions to sutton@tampabay.com....

  12. Reader questions on Obamacare, Part 2: Outwitting fines and more

    Health

    Second in a series

    The Obamacare marketplaces open for business Oct. 1 to start selling health insurance to people who don't have coverage through their work, Medicare or Medicaid. Last week, we answered eight of the most common questions from readers about the marketplace; you can find them at tampabay.com/obamacare.

    Today, we dig into more issues, from outwitting fines to figuring out subsidies. Please keep sending your questions to sutton@tampabay.com....

  13. PolitiFact Florida: Fact-checking Jim DeMint's Tampa town hall

    State Roundup

    Heritage Foundation President Jim DeMint brought his "Defund Obamacare" town hall tour to Tampa on Wednesday night and PolitiFact Florida was there. The highlights:

    • DeMint called the health care law socialized medicine and said it would make the United States system like those in Britain or Canada. PolitiFact has rated similar claims False, because the health care law leaves in place the private health care system and the free market. ...

  14. PolitiFact: 'Pants on Fire' rating for Rubio's comments on Obamacare

    Blog

    Sen. Marco Rubio says Obamacare should be stopped, but one of his talking points is way off base:  Rubio has said that "75 percent of small businesses now say they are going to be forced to either fire workers or cut their hours" because of the law.

    That's a dramatic misinterpretation of a survey conducted by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. Actually, approximately 5 to 9 percent of small businesses who answered the survey said they would do that. To find out how the numbers went wrong, read PolitiFact's full report....

  15. Review: 'The Son' by Philipp Meyer a contemporary take on Texas history

    Books

    The founding of Texas — mythic, sprawling, blood-stained, oil-splattered — seems too big to adequately confine between the covers of a novel.

    It's fortunate, then, that Texas has found author Philipp Meyer to wrestle 200 years' worth of state history into an absorbing page-turner that's also intellectually provocative.

    The Son tells the story of the McCullough family, tracing its history through the state's biggest milestones: settlers' days, Indian raids, the Civil War, border wars with Mexico, World War I, the oil boom, Lyndon Baines Johnson, the 1970s energy crisis, the savings and loan bust, and today's immigration issues. ...

    Comanche Feats of Horsemanship, George Catlin, 1834-1835.