Brittany Alana Davis, Times Staff Writer

Brittany Alana Davis

Brittany Alana Davis is a reporter covering the cities of Tarpon Springs and Safety Harbor. Her coverage of those cities is not limited to government officials and business and education leaders, but aims to explore all aspects of the two communities. No matter who you are or what path you're walking, she wants to hear your story. Brittany previously covered state government at the Tampa Bay Times/Miami Herald Tallahassee bureau. She also worked at the website and wire service Health News Florida and WLRN, the Herald's NPR station. She has a master's degree in international communication and a bachelor's degree in journalism from the University of Florida.

Phone: (727) 445-4155

Email: bdavis@tampabay.com

Twitter: @Britt_Alana

  1. Tarpon sewer lines that broke were not made for transporting sewage

    Local Government

    TARPON SPRINGS — Two sewer line breaks, one that sent sewage spewing down the street in central Tarpon Springs in August, will cost roughly $1.2 million and take at least until mid-January to repair, officials said.

    The first break was at Live Oak Street and Safford Avenue in a pipe that was 2 feet in diameter and 1,250-foot-long and carried 2 million gallons of sewage per day. It corroded from the inside out. ...

    Workers pump sewage out of a manhole and send it back to the sewage treatment plant through some long hoses running down Safford Ave.Tuesday afternoon 8/20/13.  - What the city of Tarpon Springs described to us yesterday as a little ol’ utility line break that required the closing of one lane of Live Oak Street was quite a bit more than that. Residents called today to tell us it was a major break in a sewage line that flooded their yards with sewage, caused it to bubble up inside their homes , filled a retention pond and has now made a big hole in the road. Residents’ homes and yards stink and the city is paying for them to get tetanus shots. A restaurant on the street was forced to close when sewage bubbled up in the toilets.
  2. After one year, Safety Harbor museum-city partnership thrives

    Local Government

    SAFETY HARBOR

    When the long-struggling Safety Harbor Museum of Regional History turned over daily operations to the city last year, critics questioned the wisdom of the agreement.

    Would the partnership cost the city extra money? Would the city staff interfere with the museum board? And with the museum required to share space with city recreation and arts programs, would it be forced to discard some of its artifacts?...

    The partnership helps bring more visitors to see the artifacts at the Safety Harbor Museum and Cultural Center.
  3. Three candidates to vie for Tarpon Springs seat in March; Tarapani gets new term

    Local

    TARPON SPRINGS — The campaign for the March city election will have a three-way race for one vacant seat on the City Commission.

    Chris Hrabovsky, Rea Sieber and Joe Muzio will face off for Seat 2, now held by term-limited Commissioner Susan Slattery.

    Commissioner Townsend Tarapani was automatically re-elected to Seat 1 when no one filed to run against him.

    "I am so honored and humbled by the confidence the voters showed in me by not fielding a candidate to oppose me in this year's coming election," said Tarapani, 28. "I appreciate the opportunity to complete many important ongoing and future projects within my second term."...

    Hrabovsky
  4. Politicos question Scott meeting with Tarpon Springs mayor

    Blog

    After Gov. Rick Scott's schedule went out by email Wednesday, Tarpon Springs Mayor David Archie's phone blew up with calls.

    Archie's name was right there on the governor's schedule after an event at All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg.

    For reporters who see the governor's schedule every day, the so-called "meet and greet" with the mayor of bitty Tarpon Springs was unusual enough to beg the question: Is the governor vetting Archie as a possible luitenant governor?...

  5. Safety Harbor to cut off commissioner and retiree health insurance if unpaid

    Politics

    SAFETY HARBOR — Commissioners and city government retirees who lag behind on their health insurance payments will now see their coverage terminated after 45 days, the City Commission decided Monday.

    The policy, passed unanimously, follows an anonymous letter and an audit that raised questions about former Mayor Andy Steingold's payments for city health insurance. He carried a balance for his premiums that at times approached $4,000....

  6. Authorities seek warrant after dozens of animals found at Pasco home

    Public Safety

    HUDSON — Authorities will seek a warrant this morning to inspect the inside of a northern Pasco County home where deputies said dozens of animals, including dogs and marsupials, are being kept.

    Pasco County Sheriff's Office deputies found the animals at 18310 Montour Drive, near Spring Hill, after responding to a neighbor's complaint of barking and shouting in the home.

    The county's Animal Control also became involved after deputies expressed concerns about possible animal hoarding and neglect on the property, according to Melanie Snow, a spokeswoman for the Sheriff's Office....

  7. Discord continues over outdoor displays at Sponge Docks

    Local

    TARPON SPRINGS — Despite urging from commissioners that Sponge Docks merchants work out their problems and approach the city with a unified voice, business owners continue to argue over how the city should restrict outdoor displays.

    The result? Commissioners have decided to keep almost all of a contentious September ordinance that restricts the racks for dresses, sandals and hats that line the sidewalks at the Sponge Docks....

    Tarpon Springs commissioners decided to keep almost all of a September ordinance that restricts racks of goods on sidewalks at the Sponge Docks. A second reading will come Dec. 3.
  8. In an effort to secure money, mini-bus tour for lawmakers showcases affordable housing

    Blog

    Walmart worker Melissa McComish never dreamed she could afford to own a home.

    But with the help of a state trust for low-income housing, the Clearwater single mom with two children obtained a no-interest loan and bought a trim three-bedroom house with a back yard.

    "It's the biggest blessing ever," said McComish, 46, adding that she used to be homeless. "I never could have gotten here without help."...

  9. Lawmakers visit shelters, affordable housing on minibus tour

    Legislature

    CLEARWATER

    Walmart worker Melissa McComish never dreamed she could afford to own a home.

    But with the help of a state trust for low-income housing, the Clearwater single mom with two children obtained a no-interest loan and bought a three-bedroom house with a back yard.

    "It's the biggest blessing ever," said McComish, 46, adding that she used to be homeless. "I never could have gotten here without help."...

    Melissa McComish greets a Low-Income Housing Leadership Network tour at her Clearwater home Tuesday. Samantha Harper, left, and Tracy Caddell, right, are legislative aides. Nina Bandoni, center, is the chairwoman of the network.
  10. County to reconsider controversial Safety Harbor apartments

    Blog

    When the Pinellas County Commission struck down a proposed luxury apartment complex slated for the site of the former Firmenich Citrus Plant, opponents believed they had dealt the project a death blow.

    Turns out that was only an intermission.

    The administrative law judge, Bram Canter, ruled late Monday that commissioners had erred in their decision not to allow the complex at McMullen-Booth Road and State Road 590, and had based their decision on a policy that had never been etched into code....

  11. Judge orders county to reconsider controversial Safety Harbor apartments

    Local

    SAFETY HARBOR — When the Pinellas County Commission struck down a proposed luxury apartment complex slated for the site of the former Firmenich Citrus Plant, opponents believed they had dealt the project a death blow.

    Turns out that was only an intermission.

    The administrative law judge, Bram Canter, ruled late Monday that commissioners had erred in their decision not to allow the complex at McMullen-Booth Road and State Road 590, and had based their decision on a policy that had never been etched into code....

    The Richman Group plans an apartment complex on the site of the former Firmenich Citrus Plant in Safety Harbor.
  12. Advocates use mini-bus tour to push for low-income housing money

    Blog

    For three months, advocates for low-income housing have contacted bay area lawmakers asking them to join a two-hour mini-tour of housing projects that received state money.

    The advocates asked lawmakers about their availability, called their offices and mailed formal invitations. They scheduled two tour options: one on Tuesday in North Pinellas and another on Wednesday in south Pinellas....

  13. Lawmakers to take mini-bus tour of low-income housing in Pinellas

    Local Government

    CLEARWATER — For three months, advocates for low-income housing have contacted bay area lawmakers asking them to join a two-hour mini-tour of housing projects that received state money.

    The advocates asked lawmakers about their availability, called their offices and mailed formal invitations. They scheduled two tour options: one on Tuesday in North Pinellas and another on Wednesday in south Pinellas....

  14. Popular former St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Baker endorses David Jolly in race for Bill Young seat

    Blog

    One of St. Petersburg's GOP heavyweights — former Mayor Rick Baker — has endorsed Republican David Jolly for Congress, the campaign announced Sunday.

    The endorsement comes just more than a week after the popular former mayor confirmed he would not run for the seat, and Jolly announced his candidacy.

    Jolly is the former general counsel for U.S. Rep. C.W. Bill Young, who died last month, triggering a March 11 special election for his congressional seat....

  15. Chief city saleswoman of St. Petersburg departs

    Blog

    When Mayor-elect Rick Kriseman was on the campaign tail, he vowed to scrutinize the city's marketing and communications department, which he said didn't do enough to promote local businesses and hot spots.

    With Kriseman ready to assume the mayor's seat Jan. 2, the head of that department said Sunday she's leaving — becoming the first city executive to announce a departure since Tuesday's election....