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Lucy Morgan, Times Senior Correspondent

Lucy Morgan

Lucy Morgan has been a Times reporter since 1968 and is a former Capital Bureau chief in Tallahassee. She works on special projects and writes occasional columns. She's the winner of 1985 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting.

Phone: (850) 224-7263

Email: lmorgan@tampabay.com

Twitter: @LucyTimes

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  1. Lucy Morgan: The Janet Reno I knew so well

    Perspective

    The best description of Janet Reno can be found in one word: intimidating.

    She stood 6-foot-2 in her bare feet — and they were often bare when she made it home to the rough-hewn home her mother built on the edge of the Everglades.

    She died there early Monday morning after spending a final weekend surrounded by family and longtime friends. Visitors included former Gov. Bob Graham and his wife, Adele, and former FSU president Talbot "Sandy" D'Alemberte and his wife, Patsy Palmer....

    Janet Reno, the first woman to serve as U.S. attorney general, was the epicenter of several political storms during the Clinton administration.
  2. Mortgage scam exposed by Times to air Thursday on CNBC

    Real Estate

    CASHIERS, N.C. — A $50 million North Carolina mortgage scam run by Florida residents will be featured next week on CNBC's American Greed. The program, produced by Kurtis Productions of Chicago, will air at 10 p.m. Thursday.

    The mortgage fraud was disclosed in a series of stories published in the Tampa Bay Times in 2008 and 2009.

    Seven Florida residents, including two Hillsborough County businessmen, were sentenced to federal prison after they were convicted by a Miami jury in 2014....

    Domenic Rabuffo was accused of orchestrating the scheme, which was exposed by the Times. [Special to the Times]
  3. Bob Graham on 9/11 documents: 'The trail is still substantial ahead of us'

    Blog

    For former Sen. Bob Graham, the release of the documents after a 13-year fight made for an exciting afternoon on Martha's Vineyard where he and wife Adele were vacationing.

    "It's been exciting afternoon, but the trail is still substantial ahead of us," he said. "We have to have accountability from the CIA and the FBI for the several places they were asked to follow up on information that was developed prior to the release of the report.''...

  4. Bob Graham gets call from White House and word that review of secret 9/11 documents is underway

    Blog

    After years of pushing to gain public release of 28 secret pages of a report on the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham said he got a call from the White House on Tuesday.

    Graham told the Tampa Bay Times that Brett Holmgren, a senior policy adviser to the assistant to the president for Homeland Security, told him the review of the documents withheld from a report issued by a Joint Congressional Commission in 2003 will soon be completed....

  5. Bob Graham hopes '60 Minutes' report will help get secret 9/11 records released

    Blog

    Former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham hopes that Sunday’s 60 Minutes report will help in a prolonged battle to declassify sensitive records on Saudi Arabian officials who helped hijackers plot to fly airplanes into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001.

    The former Florida governor appeared on the CBS program to talk about 28 pages of a congressional report on 9/11 that has remained secret for 13 years. Graham was chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee and co-chairman of a joint congressional commission that investigated the attacks and wrote the full 838-page report. He and several other commission members are pushing for release of the 28 pages that were classified....

  6. Former Sen. Bob Graham hopes '60 Minutes' report will help get secret 9/11 records released

    State Roundup

    Former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham hopes that Sunday's 60 Minutes report will help in a prolonged battle to declassify sensitive records on Saudi Arabian officials who helped hijackers plot to fly airplanes into the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on Sept. 11, 2001.

    The former Florida governor appeared on the CBS program to talk about 28 pages of a congressional report on 9/11 that has remained secret for 13 years. Graham was chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee and co-chairman of a joint congressional commission that investigated the attacks and wrote the full 838-page report. He and several other commission members are pushing for release of the 28 pages that were classified....

    Former Sen. Bob Graham appeared on 60 Minutes on Sunday to talk about a congressional report on 9/11.
  7. Former Gov. Bob Graham goes on 60 Minutes to talk about Saudi/911 hijackers connections

    Blog

    On Sunday right after the Masters' Golf Tournament ends, CBS will feature former Florida Gov. Bob Graham's quest to declassify and make public a report outlining allegations of Saudi Arabian support of some of the hijackers who flew airplanes into the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

    Graham has been trying to get President Obama to declassify a 28-page report on a Saudi family that lived in a gated Sarasota community where some of the pilots visited in the weeks before the attack. The family fled about 10 days before September 11, leaving a wave of questions investigated by the FBI....

  8. Why did the FBI detain Bob Graham?

    Perspective

    CASHIERS, N.C.

    Going to lunch with former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham can be hazardous to retirement.

    And extremely interesting.

    Take the recent Sunday when my husband and I met Graham, his wife, Adele, and daughter, U.S. Rep. Gwen Graham of Tallahassee, for lunch at Randevu, a small restaurant in the mountains of western North Carolina.

    Over eggs benedict and cheese grits, Graham updated us on his continuing fight to force the FBI to disclose reports documenting the involvement of a Saudi Arabian family that left Sarasota in great haste 11 days before terrorists attacked the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. ...

    When Bob Graham was in the Senate, he chaired the Intelligence Committee and a panel that probed the Sept. 11 attacks.
  9. Facing life in prison, drug smuggler thinks of home in Pinellas County

    Crime

    Tommy Powell, international drug smuggler, picked an odd time to think about where he would like to retire.

    It was 1984. Powell, who was just in his mid 30s, had been extradited after spending a decade on the lam overseas. He stood accused of importing more than 300,000 pounds of marijuana into the United States. A maximum sentence of life plus 70 years would have left details of his retirement entirely in the hands of the Federal Bureau of Prisons. ...

    Tommy Powell, in a 2014 photo, at home in Pinellas County. [Courtesy of Tommy Powell]
  10. Traffic accident in Australia ends 40-year-old mystery in Florida

    Crime

    Death comes to everyone, even those — like Raymond Grady Stansel Jr. — who have been dead for 40 years.

    His first passing was by far the more newsworthy.

    It was 1974, and Florida's statewide grand jury had indicted Stansel for smuggling more than 12 tons of marijuana. Prosecutors described Stansel, then a 37-year-old fisherman and charter boat captain out of Tarpon Springs, as a "soldier of fortune."...

    Raymond Grady Stansel Jr. fled with Janet Wood to Australia where they took the names Lee and Janet Lafferty. Here is Lafferty in 1980 with daughters Jesse, right, and Kianna.
  11. From the archives: Lawton Chiles' camp admits to 'mystery' calls against Jeb Bush campaign

    State Roundup

    Editor's Note: Originally published Nov. 4, 1995.

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Lawton Chiles' campaign made the mystery calls that frightened thousands of senior citizens in the days before the 1994 election.

    After a year of denials, the admission came Friday evening in a letter written by a campaign attorney who insists Chiles and Lt. Gov. Buddy MacKay did not know the campaign made the calls....

    Before a Tampa debate in November 1994, Lawton Chiles and Jeb Bush shake hands. (Times Photo (1994)   |   Jim Stem)
  12. From the archives: Doors open soon after Jeb Bush's awkward first days

    State Roundup

    Editor's note: Originally published Jan. 9, 1999.

    Educating a new governor is hard work, but this one appears to be learning fast.

    On Wednesday, Gov. Jeb Bush's first full day in office, no one had a copy of the governor's schedule, a public record we review each day as we determine where news is breaking.

    In Tallahassee's pecking order, the governor comes first. If he is having a press conference at 10 a.m., it becomes our priority for that hour. In fact, savvy state officials won't even schedule anything that conflicts with a governor....

    Florida Gov. Jeb Bush meets the capital press corps for the first time as governor and attempts to explain why the media was not allowed into meetings with key legislative leaders earlier on Jan. 6, 1999. (AP Photo)
  13. From the archives: Jeb Bush takes loss in stride; GOP hopes he runs again

    State Roundup

    Editor's Note: Originally published Nov. 10, 1994.

    MIAMI — Jeb Bush lost his first political race, but Florida's growing Republican Party found a new star that is likely to return.

    Bush was the picture of class as he watched 18 months of hard work go down the tubes Tuesday night. He kept family, friends and even reporters around him and conceded the race as soon as he saw it was hopeless....

    Republican gubernatorial candidate Jeb Bush wipes his brow while talking to reporters after conceding the election to Florida Gov. Lawton Chiles in Miami on Nov. 8, l994.  (AP Photo)
  14. From the archives: Day 1, Jeb Bush skirts Sunshine Law

    State Roundup

    Editor's note: Originally published Jan. 7, 1999

    TALLAHASSEE — On his first full day in office, Gov. Jeb Bush met with the two most powerful public officials in Florida's Legislature, but the meetings weren't public.

    Bush's staff refused to let reporters in to listen as he chatted with House Speaker John Thrasher and Senate President Toni Jennings.

    The governor and his aides said the sessions were little more than "courtesy calls," but later they acknowledged they discussed tax cuts, Senate confirmation of appointments and the state's multibillion-dollar budget....

    Florida Gov. Jeb Bush is sworn in by Florida Chief Justice Major Harding, right, as Bush's wife Columba holds the Bible and their son George P., left, looks on Jan 5, 1999, in Tallahassee. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)
  15. Lucy Morgan: Putting the 'public' back in public office

    Columns

    Some governors are slow learners. Gov. Rick Scott is beyond slow. He doesn't learn. He doesn't appear to care about public access to records, meetings and information traditionally available to Floridians.

    Most governors have a bit of trouble getting used to working in the fishbowl of state government, particularly if they won election without stopping off in another elected office that operated in the Florida sunshine....

    A governor’s response to open government sets the tone for all other public officials in Florida. By any measure, Gov. Rick Scott’s response is a failure.