Tia Mitchell, Times/Herald Tallahassee Bureau

Tia Mitchell

Tia Mitchell covers state government and politics in the Tampa Bay Times/Miami Herald Tallahassee Bureau. She joined the politics team in late 2011 after working as a general assignment reporter in the Times' Tampa bureau for most of the year. Tia is a graduate of Florida A&M University with a degree in journalism. She has worked at the Florida Times-Union newspaper in Jacksonville and has also interned at the Tallahassee Democrat and the Ocala Star-Banner. She is originally from Louisville, Ky.

Phone: (850) 224-7263

Email: tmitchell@tampabay.com

Twitter: @TBTia

  1. Weatherford: Involve BOG in FAMU-FSU engineering discussions

    Blog

    Budget talks surrounding a Senate proposal to divide the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering should involve the state Board of Governors, House Speaker Will Weatherford said. The House has yet to agree to include money in the final budget for the split, and the decision may ultimately rest with Weatherford himself.

    "I would say that both (Florida State University) and (Florida A&M University) have very good points to be made," Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, said. "I would also say that the Board of Governors has  a role to play in this conversation. I don’t think the Florida House is in a rush to do anything."...

  2. Weatherford: BOG should have a say in FAMU-FSU engineering split

    Blog

    House Speaker Will Weatherford said discussion about a Senate proposal to divide the FAMU-FSU College of Engineering into separate programs should involve the state Board of Governors. The House has yet to agree to include money in the final budget for the split, and the decision may ultimately rest with Weatherford himself.

    "I would say that both (Florida State University) and (Florida A&M University) have very good points to be made," Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, said. "I would also say that the Board of Governors has  a role to play in this conversation. I don’t think the Florida House is in a rush to do anything."...

  3. 'Trauma drama' bill could get bogged down in final days of session

    Blog

    From Friday's paper:

    A plan to shield three disputed trauma centers from legal action — while also placing limits on trauma center access fees — faces an uncertain future as the legislative session winds down.

    The so-called "trauma drama" fix is weighed down with language from at least 10 other proposals, turning into an omnibus bill that may be too unwieldy to gain Senate approval....

  4. 'Trauma drama' bill could get bogged down in waning days of session

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — A plan to shield three disputed trauma centers from legal action — while also placing limits on trauma center access fees — faces an uncertain future as the legislative session winds down.

    The so-called "trauma drama" fix is weighed down with language from at least 10 other proposals, turning into an omnibus bill that may be too unwieldy to gain Senate approval....

  5. Performance funding for state universities divides the Legislature

    Blog

    UPDATE: A spokesman for House Speaker Will Weatherford said the House proposal for performance funding found in House Bill 5105 stalled in its final committee stop and is effectively dead. The House will not waive its rules to resurrect the proposal, even though the legislation started out on solid ground as a bill introduced by the Higher Education and Workforce Subcommittee.

    Instead, the House inserted language in its version of the budget that is very similar to the Senate proposal and embraces the Board of Governors' performance funding criteria....

  6. Performance funding for state universities among unresolved budget issues

    Blog

    UPDATE: A spokesman for House Speaker Will Weatherford said the House proposal for performance funding found in HB 5105 is effectively dead after failing to pass its final committee. The House will not waive rules to resurrect the proposal, even though it started out on solid ground as a bill introduced by the Higher Education and Workforce Subcommittee.

    Instead, the House inserted language in its version of the budget that is very similar to the Senate proposal and embraces the Board of Governors' performance funding criteria....

  7. Gov. Rick Scott will sign legislation making killing fetuses a crime

    Blog

    From today's paper:

    Harming a fetus while committing a crime, no matter how small the embryo, would carry stiffer penalties under a proposed law now awaiting Florida Gov. Rick Scott's signature.

    The legislation approved Wednesday by the Senate is modeled after a federal law used to bring charges against John Andrew Welden, the Tampa man who tricked ex-girlfriend Remee Jo Lee into taking an abortion drug that caused her to miscarry a 7-week-old embryo....

  8. Will lack of academic credentials keep Sen. John Thrasher from becoming FSU prez?

    Blog

    They never mentioned his name, but Sen. John Thrasher is clearly on the minds of Florida State University stakeholders as the presidential search unfolds.  Several people made comments during Wednesday's search committee meeting that indicated they would not want a politician like Thrasher as the university's next president. However, the firm hired to screen candidates has insisted that a wide net be cast and no potential candidates be discouraged from applying....

  9. FSU students, faculty say next president should be an academic

    Blog

    Sen. John Trasher's name may not be mentioned, but he's clearly on the minds of Florida State University stakeholders as the presidential search unfolds.  Several people made comments during Wednesday's search committee meeting that indicated they would not want a politician like Thrasher as the university's next president. However, the firm hired to screen candidates has insisted that a wide net be cast and no potential candidates be discouraged from applying.>...

  10. Legislation to make killing fetuses a crime in Florida awaits Gov. Rick Scott's signature

    Health

    TALLAHASSEE — Harming a fetus while committing a crime, no matter how small the embryo, would carry stiffer penalties under a proposed law now awaiting Florida Gov. Rick Scott's signature.

    The legislation approved Wednesday by the Senate is modeled after a federal law used to bring charges against John Andrew Welden, the Tampa man who tricked ex-girlfriend Remee Jo Lee into taking an abortion drug that caused her to miscarry a 7-week-old embryo....

    The bill’s modeled after a federal law used against John Andrew Welden, who tricked Remee Lee into taking an abortion drug.
  11. Florida House votes to regulate e-cigarette sales

    Health

    TALLAHASSEE — A bill that would make electronic cigarettes off limits to young people won unanimous support on Wednesday in the Florida House.

    Anti-smoking groups had been working against the proposal, largely because of a provision that would have prevented local governments from creating their own rules on e-cigarettes and tobacco products.

    But on Tuesday, Rep. Bill Hager, R-Delray Beach, assembled a bipartisan coalition that stripped the controversial language from the bill....

    Dominic Crupi, 24, of Clearwater smokes an e-cigarette at Vape Joe in Largo earlier this year. Crupi has been vaping for two years, and is venturing to get into the industry.
  12. Safety-net hospitals win delay on costly funding law

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Safety-net hospitals will get a one-year reprieve from a controversial funding formula that they said would cost them hundreds of millions of dollars.

    The so-called "tiering" law would have required counties that use local dollars to attract federal matching funds for hospitals to share that money with counties that don't raise local funds for health care. Jackson Health System in Miami was bracing for a $140 million cut as a result of the new law. Tampa General Hospital said its loss would have been $43 million. Miami Children's Hospital and All Children's Hospital in St. Petersburg estimated they would together lose $18 million....

  13. Lawmakers agree to delay controversial hospital funding model

    Blog

    Specifics still need to be ironed out, but hospitals across Florida are already celebrating the news that a controversial funding model will not be implemented as planned this year.

    The so-called "tiering" law would have required counties that use local dollars to draw down more federal money for hospitals to begin sharing that money statewide. Jackson Health System in Miami was bracing for a $140 million hit as a result of the new law. Tampa General Hospital said its loss would have been $43 million. Miami Children’s Hospital and All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg estimated they would collectively see funding cut $17.6 million....

  14. House approves charities reforms, Senate version passes final committee

    Blog

    Agriculture Commisioner Adam Putnam's massive overhaul of state laws governing charities is speeding ahead.

    The House overwhelmingly approved its version of the proposal, House Bill 629, today. The Senate version, SB 638, is ready for a floor vote, too, after gaining approval from the Appropriations Committee today. ...

  15. Bipartisan House vote restores local control of e-cigarette regulations

    Blog

    Over the objection of Republican leaders, a bi-partisan coalition in the House approved changes to an e-cigarettes regulation bill to addresses concerns from anti-smoking groups.

    No one ever questioned the intent of the proposal itself, which is to restrict the sale of electronic cigarettes and other non-tobacco products to minors. But anti-smoking groups -- the American Heart Association, American Lung Association, and American Cancer Society -- and local governments disliked three lines of the House version, HB 169, that also prohibited cities and counties from passing their own, stricter ordinances in the future....