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Waveney Ann Moore, Times Staff Writer

Waveney Ann Moore

Waveney Ann Moore is a general assignment reporter for the Tampa Bay Times. She covers a wide range of topics in the metropolitan area, most recently the debate over the future of the St. Petersburg Pier.

She was a finalist for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for "For Their Own Good," about abuse at Florida's oldest reform school. The series won the Dart Award for covering trauma, the Casey Medal for exemplary reporting on children and families and first place for nondeadline reporting in the 2010 Green Eyeshade competition run by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Moore was also a finalist for the 1998 Pulitzer as part of a team that covered the story of the Rev. Henry Lyons, former head of the National Baptist Convention U.S.A.

She's a former reporter for the Kansas City Star.

Born in Guyana, on the northern coast of South America, she is a naturalized American citizen.

Phone: (727) 892-2283

Email: wmoore@tampabay.com

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  1. From the ashes of the Mosley Motel will rise a $55 million development in St. Petersburg

    Economic Development

    ST. PETERSBURG — A Coral Gables developer has unveiled the $55 million phase of its multimillion-dollar plans for the edge of Historic Kenwood.

    Altis Cardinal, which bought and upgraded the Skyline Fifth apartments in the neighborhood several years ago, says it will build a four-story retail and self-storage facility on the site of the old Mosley Motel, convert a six-story office building into loft apartments and add dozens more units on a former commercial site....

    Rendering of four-story retail and self-storage facility planned for the site of the former Mosley Motel. Altis Cardinal plans to add a $55 million phase to its now $75 million plan to redevelop the edge of Historic Kenwood. [Courtesy of Altis Cardinal]
  2. Invisible Crisis: In Pinellas, dearth of emergency shelters is a crisis for homeless families

    Human Interest

    ST. PETERSBURG — Baby in tow, Ariana Turner followed her boyfriend to Florida about 20 months ago to chase dreams of a better life.

    They never found it. He ended up out of work. They wore out their welcome at his aunt's. They went their separate ways.

    Last month, Turner and her daughter, Namine, now 2, found themselves homeless.

    They ended up at a shelter run by the St. Petersburg Free Clinic....

    Ariana Turner, 22, plays with her daughter, Namine Cowell, 2 at the St. Petersburg Free Clinic Family Residence in St. Petersburg Wednesday, May 31, 2017.   Turner and her daughter are living at the shelter after falling on hard times. "I just want a place to call home," said Turner. LARA CERRI   |   Times
  3. CASA appoints new chief executive officer

    Human Interest

    ST. PETERSBURG — Lariana Forsythe has been named interim CEO of Community Action Stops Abuse, better known as CASA. Her interim status is a temporary designation while she completes Florida Administrative Rule requirements.

    Forsythe, who was hired after a nationwide search, has more than 20 years of nonprofit experience and most recently served as vice president and chief development officer of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Metro Phoenix. In addition to 17 years with the Boys & Girls Clubs, she has had a variety of roles with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and Special Olympics....

    Lariana Forsythe
  4. St. Petersburg's new pier is a go: City Council approves first construction funds

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — A new pier will finally rise on the downtown waterfront, continuing a tradition that is more than a century old.

    The City Council voted 7-1 on Thursday to appropriate $17.6 million to begin construction of the new Pier District. Set to be finished in early 2019, it will replace the 1970s-era inverted pyramid, which itself replaced the 1926 Million Dollar Pier.

    The $17.6 million will be used to pay for the over-water portion of the project. The first step will be to start driving piles into the bottom of Tampa Bay for the pier platform. The work could start as soon as the end of this month....

    This rendering shows the pier structure. Construction is expected to begin at the end of June; it will take six months to drive 426 piles into Tampa Bay to build the pier platform.
  5. Pier gets its Army Corps of Engineers Permit

    Blog

    ST. PETERSBURG – After months of waiting, the city has at last received a key permit to build the Pier.

    Wednesday a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers spokeswoman said the agency had given its stamp of approval to the project. Piles for the overwater area of the Pier District are expected to start going in this month. 

    The Pier District is a 26-acre expanse that includes the pier, which will extend 1,265 feet into Tampa Bay and include Spa Beach. The area also includes the pier approach, which will run from Spa Beach to the edge of downtown, following the waterfront from the Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort & Golf Club to Pioneer Park and Beach Drive. ...

    After months of waiting, the city has at last received a key permit to build the Pier.
  6. St. Petersburg hopeful Congress will add a NOAA facility, research vessel to downtown waterfront

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The city's efforts to energize its downtown port could get a big boost from the federal government.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration could build a new facility along the downtown waterfront that would also be home port for the first of its research vessels to be stationed in Florida.

    It all depends on what Congress does. But a good first sign was Thursday's announcement by U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson that the Senate Commerce Committee he sits on approved a provision that could make the facility a reality....

    There is vacant land next to SRI International, 450 Eighth Ave. SE, that could be the site of a new National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration center in downtown St. Petersburg.
  7. Consultant: St. Pete Pier District could draw millions

    Local Government

    By Waveney Ann moore

    Times Staff Writer

    ST. PETERSBURG — An economic analysis of the future Pier District promises a rosy return on the project's $66 million price tag.

    The study by Lambert Advisory of Miami estimates that the district — which is not yet under construction and is expected to open at the end of 2018 — will have a potential annual economic impact on St. Petersburg of $80 million, create hundreds of jobs, bring in close to two million visitors a year and boost demand for hotels and restaurants....

    Analysts say the Pier District will create hundreds of jobs and bring in close to 2 million visitors a year.
  8. Homeowners upset that city of St. Petersburg owns land under their docks, requires them to sign lease

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — More than a decade ago, Scott Willis got permits to extend and repair his dock and add a boat lift at his property.

    But several years ago, he and his neighbors were stunned to learn that their docks actually sit on city-owned waterfront parkland. That's because the docks — across a body of water from Crisp Park — were built on submerged land that, like the park, belongs to St. Petersburg....

    Scott Willis is one of the homeowners who learned that he can’t improve his dock, or even drink alcohol there, without a city lease.
  9. American Arts and Crafts Museum in St. Petersburg ready to build

    Human Interest

    ST. PETERSBURG — Construction of the $70 million Museum of the American Arts and Crafts Movement in downtown is about to start.

    Work was expected to start in January, but the permits were not ready until Monday, according to the city's construction services and permitting office.

    "Mobilization has begun," said Rudy Ciccarello, the businessman and collector who is spearheading the project at Fourth Avenue N between Third and Fourth streets....

    An artists' rendering of the $70 million Museum of the American Arts and Crafts Movement, which is slated to start construction in downtown St. Petersburg. [Courtesy of Alfonso Architects]
  10. Work at Jordan Park housing complex begins with new air conditioners, doors

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — Last month the St. Petersburg Housing Authority held a party to celebrate taking back control of Jordan Park.

    St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman, U.S. Rep. Charlie Crist and Pinellas County Urban League president Watson Haynes were among those who attended the April 22 festivities at the housing complex near 22nd Street and Ninth Avenue S.

    Now begins the work of repairing Jordan Park....

  11. St. Petersburg Housing Authority issues first contracts to repair its new property, Jordan Park

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — Last month the St. Petersburg Housing Authority held a party to celebrate taking back control of Jordan Park.

    St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman, Congressman Charlie Crist and Pinellas County Urban League president Watson Haynes were among those who attended the April 22 festivities at the housing complex near 22nd Street and Ninth Avenue S.

    Now begins the work of repairing Jordan Park....

    Leadership Florida volunteer Matt Brockelman (right) gets some assistance with putting mulch into a wheelbarrow from Ladarrian Carnes at the Jordan Park housing complex in December 2016. Volunteers picked up trash, pulled weeds and installed new mulch along plant bed areas. On Tuesday the St. Petersburg Housin Authority closed on the complex, taking it back from private hands, after residents complained it had fallen into disrepair. [EVE EDELHEIT   |   Times]

  12. Work to soon start on St. Petersburg's Museum of the American Arts and Crafts Movement

    Business

    Times Staff Writer

    ST. PETERSBURG — Construction of the $70 million Museum of the American Arts and Crafts Movement in downtown is about to start.

    Work was expected to start in January, but the permits were not ready until Monday, according to the city's construction services and permitting office.

    "Mobilization has begun," said Rudy Ciccarello, the businessman and collector who is spearheading the project at Fourth Avenue N, between Third and Fourth streets....

    An artist's rendering of the $70 million Museum of the American Arts and Crafts Movement, which is slated to start construction in downtown St. Petersburg. That work was supposed to start in January but the city just issued the construction permits. The building should take up to two years to build. [Courtesy of Alfonso Architects]
  13. St. Petersburg's 34th Street corridor is ripe for redevelopment, and is even getting its own Starbucks

    Economic Development

    ST. PETERSBURG — The 34th Street corridor has long been known as a busy yet unappealing stretch of commercial roadway. It's where fast-food restaurants, supermarkets, car dealerships and gas stations coexist with cheap motels, pawn shops and struggling strip malls.

    But not even 34th Street can resist the current redevelopment boom.

    Developers say the thoroughfare is brimming with economic potential....

    Starbucks is under construction at the former Long John Silver’s location at 2190 34th St. N. It’s scheduled to open next month.
  14. Now it's Pinellas' turn to wrestle with $14 million extra for St. Pete's Pier District

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The City Council's prolonged discussion Thursday night to formally request that Pinellas County allot an additional $14 million to the Pier District, downtown transportation and parking eventually ended with a compromise that passed by a vote of 5-3.

    The next vote might not be any easier: Will the council's carefully crafted resolution convince the Pinellas County Commission to dedicate even more money to the already $66 million pier project?...

    St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman wants Pinellas County to reallocate $14 million to add amenities to the $66 million Pier District. The City Council approved the request last week, and now it's up to the Pinellas County Commission. [Rogers Partners Architects+Urban Designers and ASD]
  15. Now it's Pinellas County's turn to wrestle with $14 million extra for St. Petersburg's Pier District

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The City Council's prolonged discussion Thursday night to formally request that Pinellas County allot an additional $14 million to the Pier District, downtown transportation and parking eventually ended with a compromise that passed by a vote of 5-3.

    The next vote might not be any easier: Will the council's carefully crafted resolution persuade the Pinellas County Commission to dedicate even more money to the already $66 million Pier?...

    Pinellas County Commission Chair Janet Long said the plans for the $14 million concern her.