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Waveney Ann Moore, Times Staff Writer

Waveney Ann Moore

Waveney Ann Moore is a general assignment reporter for the Tampa Bay Times. She covers a wide range of topics in the metropolitan area, most recently the debate over the future of the St. Petersburg Pier.

She was a finalist for the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for "For Their Own Good," about abuse at Florida's oldest reform school. The series won the Dart Award for covering trauma, the Casey Medal for exemplary reporting on children and families and first place for nondeadline reporting in the 2010 Green Eyeshade competition run by the Society of Professional Journalists.

Moore was also a finalist for the 1998 Pulitzer as part of a team that covered the story of the Rev. Henry Lyons, former head of the National Baptist Convention U.S.A.

She's a former reporter for the Kansas City Star.

Born in Guyana, on the northern coast of South America, she is a naturalized American citizen.

Phone: (727) 892-2283

Email: wmoore@tampabay.com

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  1. Now it's Pinellas' turn to wrestle with $14 million extra for St. Pete's Pier District

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The City Council's prolonged discussion Thursday night to formally request that Pinellas County allot an additional $14 million to the Pier District, downtown transportation and parking eventually ended with a compromise that passed by a vote of 5-3.

    The next vote might not be any easier: Will the council's carefully crafted resolution convince the Pinellas County Commission to dedicate even more money to the already $66 million pier project?...

    St. Petersburg Mayor Rick Kriseman wants Pinellas County to reallocate $14 million to add amenities to the $66 million Pier District. The City Council approved the request last week, and now it's up to the Pinellas County Commission. [Rogers Partners Architects+Urban Designers and ASD]
  2. Now it's Pinellas County's turn to wrestle with $14 million extra for St. Petersburg's Pier District

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The City Council's prolonged discussion Thursday night to formally request that Pinellas County allot an additional $14 million to the Pier District, downtown transportation and parking eventually ended with a compromise that passed by a vote of 5-3.

    The next vote might not be any easier: Will the council's carefully crafted resolution persuade the Pinellas County Commission to dedicate even more money to the already $66 million Pier?...

    Mayor Rick Kriseman’s original plan was to use the entire $14 million in tax increment financing to add extra features to the Pier District, to the disagreement of some City Council members.
  3. St. Petersburg council argues, then agrees on $14 million Pier District request

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The City Council on Thursday night approved a formal request to Pinellas County to reallocate an extra $14 million to the Pier District project. But as usual, when it comes to the Pier, even this simple request grew complicated and contentious.

    "I think everyone wants this Pier to be the best it can be," City Council chair Darden Rice said. "It's just figuring out the details in how to get there."...

    It took awhile but late Thursday night the St. Petersburg City Council finalized a request to Pinellas County that would boost the budget for the new Pier District by $14 million. The council decided that $10 million would go to the pier and the downtown waterfront, and $4 million would go to transportation and parking. But Pinellas County has to approve reallocating the money. [Courtesy of St. Petersburg]
  4. St. Petersburg City Council set to vote on request to Pinellas County for extra $14 million for Pier

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG —The City Council is expected Thursday to finalize a request to Pinellas County that could boost the budget for the new Pier District by $14 million, which would bring the total cost to $80 million.

    It's just one of many decisions and hurdles the project faces to get started — and finished — on time....

    The St. Petersburg City Council is expected Thursday to finalize a request to Pinellas County that would boost the budget for the new Pier District by $14 million, which would bring the total cost to $80 million. [Courtesy of St. Petersburg]
  5. Decisions loom as time grows short to get the new St. Petersburg Pier built on time

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — This summer is crunch time for the new Pier.

    Construction of the multi-million dollar landmark is supposed to begin in May. A diesel impact hammer is supposed to start driving test piles deep into the bottom of the bay in June.

    But the city has several hurdles to cross before it can start, and finish, the project by its December 2018 deadline.

    Two key regulatory agencies, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and Pinellas County, have yet to sign off on the project....

    A rendering shows plans for St. Petersburg’s $66 million Pier District. The current deadline for the project is December 2018.
  6. For Passover, Rabbi Jacob Luski remembers milestones of his life and faith

    Religion

    ST. PETERSBURG — For four decades, through the birth of three children, the construction of a synagogue and leading dozens of congregational Seders, Rabbi Jacob Luski has taught, counseled and prayed as the world around him changed.

    "We have seen economic upswings and downturns," he said. "We have seen the words terror and terrorism become part of our daily vocabulary."

    But through it all, the eight-day Jewish festival of Passover has remained the same....

    Rabbi Jacob Luski and his wife, Joanne, look through an illustrated Haggadah, which sets forth the order of the Passover Seder.
  7. St. Petersburg City Council wants to boost Pier budget by $14 million, but will choose what gets added

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — Mayor Rick Kriseman won a partial victory Thursday in his quest to boost the Pier District budget by an extra $14 million, but lost control over what that money will be spent on.

    The mayor had sought City Council backing to approach Pinellas County to reallocate $14 million in tax increment financing, or TIF funds, to the $66 million Pier project. That would boost the price tag to $80 million....

    The St. Petersburg City Council has a lot of decisions to make about the future of the Pier District project during Thursday's meeting, including whether to take the first steps to funding a floating sculpture from internationally renowned artist and Tampa native Janet Echelman. This piece is called Water Sky Garden and was erected in 2009 in British Columbia, Canada for the 2010 Vancouver Olympic Winter Games. [Courtesy of Janet Echelman]
  8. New St. Petersburg historic district draws praise, ire

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG

    A block of 10 homes in the Old Northeast neighborhood forms the city's newest historic district.

    Its shady sidewalks, brick streets and houses from the 1920s are nestled in one of St. Petersburg's most desirable neighborhoods. For a majority of homeowners in the newly named "700 Block of 18th Avenue Northeast Historic District," the designation brings to a successful end efforts to save a cherished neighborhood from teardowns and unsuitable replacements....

    Cooper Johnson Smith Architects and Town Planners
  9. Greater Mount Zion AME church says it has true deed to Lincoln Cemetery

    Human Interest

    GULFPORT — Greater Mount Zion AME Church said it has the true deed to a historic African-American cemetery and will fight for control of the property.

    That could mean going to court and challenging the deed that Vanessa Gray, a 23-year-old Gulfport resident, obtained in February.

    Gray, who is white, believes her deed gave her organization control of the predominantly black burial ground. Hundreds of black people, including Civil War and other military veterans, have been buried since 1926....

    Vanessa Gray, 23, obtained a deed to Lincoln Cemetery in February. The church says they will challenge her.
  10. Epilogue: World War II veteran William Eisenhart

    Obituaries

    William E. "Bill" Eisenhart's life was defined by his dedication to the Air Force and to his country.

    Those who knew him well use adjectives such as honest, dependable and generous to describe the retired colonel and World War II veteran who died March 21 at his home in Hilton Head, S.C. He was 97.

    "He liked to have things done correctly," said his eldest daughter, Diana Rae Strangio, 71, of Oracle, Ariz. "He took great care, not only of his work. His family life was an example of that....

    Retired Col. William E. Eisenhart, who died at age 97, married his second wife, Penny Gahr-Eisenhart, in 2007.
  11. As more vessels dock in St. Petersburg, city hopes for a busy waterfront in its future

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The downtown waterfront, a somnolent stretch in decades past, has emerged as one of the coolest places to be in Tampa Bay. Beach Drive hums with sidewalk diners. Pedestrians jostle for space. Bars, restaurants and shops are now pushing west.

    To the south is a burgeoning marine science community. To the north, the majestic Vinoy Renaissance St. Petersburg Resort & Golf Club has broken ground on a new marina-front restaurant. And construction could start in a matter of weeks on replacing the waterfront's signature landmark, the Pier....

    The Cross Bay Ferry, far right, passes behind the tall ship Lynx, center, from the Vinoy Basin in St. Petersburg. The city hopes to attract more vessels for entertainment and tourism to the downtown waterfront. [SCOTT KEELER   |   Times]
  12. St. Petersburg's troubled Jordan Park housing complex is finally back under public control

    Business

    ST. PETERSBURG — Jordan Park, the historic public housing complex, is back in the hands of the St. Petersburg Housing Authority.

    The agency closed on the 24-acre property near 22nd Street and Ninth Avenue S on Tuesday, buying it back from Jordan Park Development Partners — a partnership of the Richman Group of Florida and Landex of Jacksonville.

    The housing authority paid nothing apart from closing costs for the 237-apartment complex. That was because of an agreement that it would spend the $400,000 price tag to improve the property. Residents have complained about rodents, mold, inoperable appliances and other problems....

    Leadership Florida volunteer Matt Brockelman (right) gets some assistance with putting mulch into a wheelbarrow from Ladarrian Carnes at the Jordan Park housing complex in December 2016. Volunteers picked up trash, pulled weeds and installed new mulch along plant bed areas. On Tuesday the St. Petersburg Housin Authority closed on the complex, taking it back from private hands, after residents complained it had fallen into disrepair. [EVE EDELHEIT   |   Times]

  13. St. Petersburg's Skyway Marina District gets new dining, drinking option: The Getaway(w/video)

    Business

    ST. PETERSBURG — The city's efforts to turn the Skyway Marina District into a commercial and retail destination just got a big boost: The Getaway, a popular waterfront restaurant on Gandy Boulevard, plans to open a second waterfront location in the district near the Sunshine Skyway bridge.

    The Getaway's owners hope the new bar and restaurant will be open by Thanksgiving in a former boat showroom at Maximo Marina at 4801 37th St. S, which is undergoing a $20 million renovation....

    St. Petersburg's efforts to turn the Skyway Marina District into a commercial and retail destination got a big boost when the owners of the Getaway, a popular waterfront restaurant on Gandy Boulevard, announced plans to open a second waterfront spot in the neighborhoods near the Sunshine Skyway Bridge. This is an artist's rendering of what the establishment could look like. The Getaway̢۪s owners hope the new bar and restaurant will be open by Thanksgiving in the former boat showroom at Maximo Marina at 4801 37th St. S. [Courtesy of the Getaway]
  14. The discussion begins as Pope Francis speaks of married priests

    Religion

    ST. PETERSBURG — When Pope Francis raised the possibility of married priests earlier this month, it naturally raised a question for some men.

    What might have been?

    Consider Patrick J. Clarke.

    He had been a well-liked priest at Espiritu Santo Catholic Church in Safety Harbor in 1996, when someone sent a copy of his marriage certificate to then-Bishop Robert N. Lynch. Clarke, it turned out, had been secretly married for 15 years. Lynch gave him a choice: leave the marriage or leave the priesthood. Clarke chose to stay with his wife....

    Merlene Roberts helps her husband, Deacon Lionel Roberts, with his vestments before Mass at Blessed Trinity Catholic Church in St. Petersburg in 2015. Lionel Roberts, 91, was a monk for 14 years before he married, had a family and became a deacon.
  15. Former St. Pete Mayor Rick Baker fields Rowdies stadium questions

    Local Government

    ST. PETERSBURG — The Tampa Bay Rowdies took the team's quest for a long-term lease agreement at Al Lang Stadium to neighborhood leaders Wednesday.

    The team's campaign in preparation for a May 2 citywide vote included a video, flyers and refrigerator magnets to help woo the small crowd at the Council of Neighborhood Associations' (CONA) monthly meeting.

    The team's goal is to convince St. Petersburg voters to let the city negotiate a lease of up to 25 years for the waterfront stadium, which Rowdies owner Bill Edwards wants to renovate for a Major League Soccer expansion franchise....

    The St. Petersburg City Council has approved a May 2 referendum that would allow voters to decide whether to let the Tampa Bay Rowdies expand historic Al Lang Stadium to 18,000 seats. The Rowdies' goal is to position the franchise to make the jump to Major League Soccer in the coming years. Now the Rowdies are taking that proposal to the public. [Courtesy of Tampa Bay Rowdies]