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30 refugees become US citizens honoring World Refugee Day (w/video)

Thirty refugees to the United States became US Citizens, Friday, as they were sworn in during a Naturalization Oath Ceremony, Friday, 6/16/17 at Pinellas Technical College, St. Petersburg. Front, left to right: are new US citizens Ali Alazzawi who is from Iraq, and Mileydis Guerra from Cuba. 30 refugees became US citizens. The ceremony also included recognition to World Refugee Day.
Published Jun. 17, 2017

30 former refugees were sworn in today as new US citizens at Pinellas Technical College. World Refugee Day was also celebrated at the event as various former refugees were honored for their service around Tampa Bay.

Dancers from The Democratic Republic of the Congo entertained guests and their families with a "Dance of Hope," for the new US citizens.

New US citizen, Ali Alazzawi, a native of Baghdad, Iraq, said he has great hope as he looks to the future with his family in the US. "I want to thank everyone for this great opportunity I have been given," he said.

Of the 30 newest citizens, a third are Cuban. Bosnia-Herzegovina, Colombia, Philippines and Venezuela each had two. The others came from as nearby as Haiti and as far as Burma.

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