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GARDEN TIPS

June and July are hot, deep summer months. We don't do a great deal of planting now, but there's plenty to think about in the garden. SOD WEBWORM: Watch for dingy brown moths with about a }-inch wingspan. They are the adult stage of the sod webworm. Moths flying around grassy areas are often an indication that eggs are being laid. These eggs will hatch into small green caterpillars in five to seven days. The webworm larva feed primarily at night and remain in a curled position on or near the soil surface during the day. Injured grass has notches chewed along the sides of the blades. The foliage may be completely stripped in patches. The soap flush is a good way to detect sod webworms. Mix 2 tablespoons of dishwashing liquid in a gallon sprinkler can. Fill with water and drench a four-square-foot area. Observe the area for about two minutes. Soap is an irritant causing insects to surface. Pesticides labeled for sod webworm control are Bacillus thuringiensis, Dipel, diazinon, Dursban or Sevin. Sod webworms may reinfest the lawn within one to three weeks after treatment. Continue to examine the lawn and reapply pesticide as required.

MOLE CRICKETS: These insects, which are a severe problem in Bahiagrass lawns, seem to be even worse this year, if that is possible. June and July are the months when the mole cricket bait works best. The only problem is that the bait is rendered ineffective should it rain or be irrigated soon after being applied.

_ By JOAN BRADSHAW, urban horticulture extension agent, and OPAL SCHALLMO, urban horticulturist, Pinellas County Cooperative Extention Service

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