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WORLD WAR II // 50 YEARS AGO TODAY

From newspapers of Sept. 7, 1945: President Truman tells Congress that the nation probably is headed for an economic boom but that the next few months of transition from war to peace are crucial. "What we do now will affect our life for decades to come," the president says. Warning that there will be considerable unemployment as the armed forces demobilize, Truman calls for unemployment compensation of at least $25 a week for six months; an increase of the minimum wage, now 40 cents an hour; continuation of the no-strike, no-lockout policy; only limited cuts in taxes; and keeping controls on prices, wages and rents to prevent inflation. The Senate unanimously votes for a congressional investigation of the Pearl Harbor disaster. Truman says he supports the inquiry. A general freed from a Japanese prison camp returns home to San Francisco with stories of what life in captivity was like. "We worked and starved," says Maj. Gen. Albert Jones. "We were stripped in parade. We were slapped in public. We were forced to pray three times a day to the emperor. We were made to bow to Jap privates and Jap civilians. There was no food. There was nothing. I don't like Nips. I don't like them at all."

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