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U.S. moves to 6-0 in preliminaries

Middleweight Rhoshii Wells and featherweight Floyd Mayweather Jr. showed the right stuff Monday night and kept the U.S. unbeaten after six bouts.

The right stuff: crashing right hands to the head that enabled Wells easily to outpoint an Iranian opponent at 165 pounds and helped Mayweather stop an opponent from Kazakhstan at 125 pounds.

Wells' 24-7 victory over Sefid Dashti Mollal was especially popular to the fans because he lives in the Atlanta suburb of Riverdale. He sometimes trains at the gym of hometown hero Evander Holyfield, former undisputed heavyweight champion.

Holyfield cheered Wells from ringside and Wells' parents rooted him on from the stands at the Alexander Memorial Coliseum.

"It felt good having the hometown crowd with me," the 19-year-old Wells said.

Cubans also won twice, running their record to 7-0. Lorenzo Aragon got up from a third-round knockdown and won a 9-6 decision over Noureddine Madjhound of Algeria at 125 pounds. In a 165-pound match, 1992 Olympic champion Ariel Hernandez outpointed Salim Kbarry of Egypt 11-2.

Mayweather, 19, of Grand Rapids, Mich., stopped Bakhtiyar Tileganov 57 seconds into the second round.

"I'm not a guy known for breaking a winning streak and I wanted to keep the winning streak going," Mayweather said.

Said U.S. coach Al Mitchell: "We knew they were going to do well, we just didn't know how well they were going to do."

There still are two rounds, however, before boxers reach the medal round.

Mayweather controlled his bout from the outset with right-hand leads and counters, forcing a standing 8-count in the second round.

A ringside physician examined Tileganov's nose in the first round. After the referee halted the action when blood flowed from the nose again in the second, the physician recommended the bout be stopped. Mayweather was ahead 10-1.

"It was an okay performance, but it wasn't one of my best," said Mayweather, whose father once boxed professionally against Sugar Ray Leonard and whose uncle Roger was a champion in the 1980s.

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