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Artist makes another debut

(ran GB edition)

Deana Carter has been through the new-artist drill so many times the past five years that she has made four new-artist debut videos, she says. But now she's ready for a major push from Capitol Nashville.

Her debut album, Did I Shave my Legs for This?, comes out Sept. 3, with the first single, Strawberry Wine, to be released Monday.

Carter, the daughter of renowned Nashville guitar picker Fred Carter Jr., grew up in one of the premier music households in Music City. People like Willie Nelson, the Carter Family, Paul Simon, Neil Young, Ray Price and Bob Dylan were always at the house. She always assumed that she would grow into a musical career.

When one attempt fizzled at age 17, she went to the University of Tennessee to study rehabilitation therapy, primarily to help elderly people such as her grandmother. She went to work as a therapist but says the work eventually wore her down. "It broke my heart every day," she says.

She decided to give music a whirl again, and a mere seven years later, she has a first album coming out.

She was initially signed by Jimmy Bowen to Liberty Records five years ago. Then Bowen left, and there were major changes at the label. Under new leadership, it became Capitol Nashville. Carter recorded and rerecorded what she had already done under Bowen.

The new president/CEO, Scott Hendricks, says one of his first tasks was to sift through the label's roster and determine whom to keep.

Hendricks says he initially was puzzled by her music. "There was something about her tape that was uniquely different. At first it kind of threw me, but the more I listened to it, the more I fell in love with it. Her voice has a magnetic vulnerability to it that I had never heard before. It does not sound like anybody else."

Hendricks compares Carter's impact on him with that of Shania Twain's on the industry. "It's fresh, as fresh, in my opinion, as Shania Twain's was," he says. "She has the fun factor of a Shania, but she also has the lyrical depth of a Mary Chapin (Carpenter)."

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