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OBITUARIES

GEORGE EVERARD KIDDER SMITH, 83, a historian, author and photographer, died Oct. 8 in New York City. Mr. Smith was a key player in saving two modern architectural masterpieces. In 1957, he encouraged William Zeckendorf to help preserve the Robie House, an early Frank Lloyd Wright home in Oak Park, Ill. Five years later, he launched a telegram campaign to sway Andre Malraux, the French culture minister, to preserve the Villa Savoie, designed by Le Corbusier in 1930.

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PHINEAS INDRITZ, 81, a civil rights lawyer and counsel to several House committees, died Oct. 15 in New York City of cancer. Mr. Indritz helped draft legislation to end racial segregation at colleges getting federal money, to stop sex discrimination in insurance premiums and to fight job discrimination against pregnant women. He retired in the 1970s.

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DR. THOMAS H. HUNTER, 84, a former dean, chancellor and vice president at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, died Thursday in Charlottesville, Va. He also served as president of the Association of American Medical Colleges and was active in international medical education.

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HANNA M. BERCOVITCH, 63, the editor-in-chief of the Library of America, which publishes a continuing series of classic literary works by American authors, died Oct. 20 in Madison, Wis., of lung cancer. The non-profit company published its first four volumes _ on the works of Walt Whitman, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Harriet Beecher Stowe and Herman Melville _ in 1982, two years after she joined it as its first staff editor.

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HAROLD WEBSTER SMITH, 86, a prominent banker who started his first bank with $25,000 and grew it into the billion-dollar Webster Financial Corp., died Friday in Waterbury, Conn. He retired as chief executive officer in 1987 after managing the business for 52 years. He continued on as chairman, retiring from that post at age 84.

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MATTHEW "MIKEY" TRUPIANO, 58, known to authorities as the ruler of the St. Louis mob, died Wednesday of a heart attack. In 1991, federal agents charged Mr. Trupiano with gambling for his involvement in an illegal gin rummy game in a back room at a used-car dealership. He was later sentenced to 2{ years in prison. In July he was added to the Missouri Gaming Commission's "black book" of people barred from the state's riverboat casinos.

_ Area obituaries and the Suncoast Deaths list appear in local sections.

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