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Sampras survives shoulder, Muster

Top-ranked Pete Sampras played through a sore shoulder and beat Thomas Muster 6-1, 4-6, 6-2 in a Paris Open quarterfinal Friday and went to the clinic for precautionary X-rays.

Sampras was sharp at the start, rolling to a 5-0 lead in 16 minutes and wrapping up the first set at 6-1 behind stinging backhands and five aces.

After rolling to the first set in 20 minutes and looking like he had the match well in hand, Sampras called to the trainer after the fifth game of the second set to have his upper right arm and shoulder treated.

"It's been sore. I don't think anything's pulled. I'm not really there. I'm serving about 80 percent," Sampras said.

Sampras was scheduled to play Yevgeny Kafelnikov today. Jonas Bjorkman and defending champion Thomas Enqvist play in the other semifinal.

MORE TENNIS: Top-seeded Francisco Clavet saved five set points in the first-set tiebreak before advancing into the semifinals of the Cerveza Club Colombia Open in Bogota. Clavet got a 7-6 (14-12), 2-3 victory when Emilio Alvarez, suffering from flulike symptoms, became disoriented after the fifth game of the second set and was forced to retire. Also reaching the semifinals were Davide Sanguinetti and Vincent Spadea.

BOXING: Former heavyweight champion Mike Tyson was released from the hospital after treatment for injuries from a motorcycle accident. Tyson and his entourage left Hartford (Conn.) Hospital at 5:15 p.m, avoiding the media. He had been having treatment and testing since breaking a rib and puncturing a lung Wednesday night. Anthony "T-Bone" Green stopped former heavyweight contender Carl "The Truth" Williams 45 seconds into the seventh round of their scheduled eight-round fight Thursday in Port Arthur, N.Y.

HORSE RACING: Bill Shoemaker, who rode more winners than any jockey in history, announced he is retiring as a trainer when Santa Anita's Oak Tree meeting ends Monday. "I just decided that I couldn't devote as much time to the business as I would like," Shoemaker said in a statement issued by Santa Anita. Shoemaker, 66, retired as a jockey Feb. 3, 1990, to become a trainer. Formal Gold, the winner of Grade I stakes in his past two starts, has a fractured right hind leg that will keep him out of the $4.4-million Breeders' Cup Classic on Nov. 8 at Hollywood Park. Dr. Wade Byrd, the attending veterinarian, said surgery would be performed today or Sunday.

FIGURE SKATING: Elvis Stojko won the short program at the Nations Cup in Gelsenkirchen, Germany, punching across the ice with speed and precision as unrelenting as the drums that paced him. In the women's competition, Germany's Tanja Szewczenko, back on the ice after a long viral illness, conquered nerves and a set of jumps to win the short program.

EQUESTRIAN: Leslie Burr-Howard aboard Selle Francais and Margie Goldstein-Engle aboard Hidden Creek's Alvaretto cautiously negotiated a tight course to earn the only clear rides in the first round of the Nations' Cup and put the United States ahead of Canada, Switzerland and Germany in the 114th annual National Horse Show in New York.

OLYMPICS: In a major concession, the chairman of the International Ski Federation said Japanese authorities will be left to work out where to start the men's downhill race in the Nagano Games. The stiffest anti-drug program in international sports, including knock-on-the-door testing, will be in full operation within 30 days for American athletes. Random no-notice, out-of-competition tests will be the final element of a strict anti-doping package adopted by the U.S. Olympic Committee a year ago, executive director Dick Schultz said.

OBITUARIES: Former U.S. Olympic swim team coach Robert Bruce Muir died Thursday at 99. Muir, who was coach of the 1956 team and an assistant in 1948 and 1952, developed the Muir System of assigning swimmers to lanes based on their qualifying times. It is still used today. Ed Chay, a retired sportswriter for the Cleveland Plain Dealer credited with coining the term "Final Four," died at 71 in Venice, Fla.

ET CETERA: The man who exposed a decades-old secret of sexual abuse at Maple Leaf Gardens leaped to his death Thursday, three days after his abuser was sentenced to two years in jail. Police said Martin Kruze, 35, jumped off a bridge. Evelyn Ashford, a four-time Olympic gold medalist and former 100-meter world-record holder, and Renaldo Nehemiah, the first to break 13 seconds for the 110-meter hurdles, have been elected to the Track and Field Hall of Fame. Joining them are 1964 Olympic 200-meter champion Henry Carr and three-time Olympic race walker Henry Laskau . . . Three teenagers _ Erica Sorgi, 15, Michelle Davison, 18, and Troy Dumais, 17 _ qualified in Athens, Ga., for the U.S. team in the World Diving Championships. Sorgi and Davison qualified in the women's 3-meter springboard; Dumais joined P.J. Bogart as qualifiers in the same event for men. The championships will be held in January in Perth, Australia.

EQUESTRIAN: McLain Ward gave in to his headstrong horse and ended up with a clean second round that guided the U.S. Equestrian Team to victory in the Nations' Cup in the 114th annual National Horse Show in New York. Margie Goldstein-Engle and Leslie Burr-Howard rode flawlessly in the first round to put the U.S. team well ahead of Germany, Canada and Switzerland.

OLYMPICS: In a major concession, the chairman of the International Ski Federation said Japanese authorities will be left to work out where to start the men's downhill race in the Nagano Games. Luge racer Larry Dolan won the conclusion of a three event race-off in Calgary, Alberta, and with the help of a tiebreaker system secured a place on the U.S. men's World Cup team. The stiffest anti-drug program in international sports, including knock-on-the-door testing, will be in operation within 30 days for U.S. athletes, U.S. Olympic Committee executive director Dick Schultz said.

_ Compiled from Times wires.

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