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Lightning now unbeaten in 3

Tampa Bay, Boston score in the first period, then the defenses take over in a 1-1 game.

Lightning defenseman Andrei Zyuzin scored and goaltender Dan Cloutier stopped 33 shots Saturday, but it wasn't enough to beat Boston at the Ice Palace.

The Bruins also scored in the first period and both teams held on for a 1-1 tie.

The tie extended the Lightning's unbeaten streak to three games (2-0-1).

It is the first such streak for the Lightning since early November and came in the fifth of a six-game homestand. Tampa Bay hosts Toronto at 7:30 p.m. today.

Boston scored first, 9 minutes, 28 seconds) into the first period, when right wing Brian Rolston beat Cloutier, who was making his first start since Dec. 17.

Defenseman Jonathan Girard started the play with a slap shot from the point that bounced off Cloutier and slid into the slot to Rolston.

Rolston, acquired as part of a trade in March that sent Ray Bourque to Colorado, poked a shot to Cloutier's left for his sixth goal of the season and 100th of his career.

The Lightning responded with a goal by Zyuzin, his first of the year.

Zyuzin was standing in front of the net when right wing Martin St. Louis passed from the right corner. He beat Bruins goalie Byron Dafoe 14:49 into the period.

Zyuzin had missed four games with a concussion and five more with post-concussion syndrome.

It also was another power-play goal for the Lightning, which entered having converted two of its last 42 chances with the man advantage.

The Lightning has scored two power-play goals in its past three games.

Other than the goal by Rolston, Cloutier looked sharp in stopping six first-period shots. The Lightning had eight shots, all in the last eight minutes of the period.

Neither team scored in the second period, but it wasn't for lack of chances.

Both teams were 0-for-3 on the power play.

The Lightning had three serious chances to score. The first came after it killed a penalty midway through the period.

Right wing Sheldon Keefe's penalty for roughing expired and when he came out of the penalty box he led a breakaway that including right wing Mike Johnson and defenseman Paul Mara.

Mara's slap shot from the point was saved by Dafoe with 11:27 remaining.

Tampa Bay's other two chances involved St. Louis, who scored two goals against Philadelphia Thursday.

St. Louis was stopped by Dafoe on a breakaway with 8:58 remaining, then appeared to hit the post on the Lightning's fifth power play.

Cloutier was challenged with 13 shots in the second period.

No save was more impressive than the split-legged one he made on center Joe Thornton, whose low slap shot was stopped by a split-legged Cloutier.

Neither team scored in the third, sending the game into overtime, where Tampa Bay is 1-2-5 this season while Boston went to 1-4-5.

The Lightning finished 1-for-6 on the power play, but Boston was worse at 0-for-6.

FEELING GOOD: Stan Drulia, who has missed the last eight games with a nagging back injury, is back in town after spending two days in St. Louis receiving treatment.

"I feel a lot better today than when I left," Drulia said before the Boston game.

The veteran right wing said the problem was diagnosed as swelling in his lower back. He was treated with two shots and skated pain-free for 15 minutes Friday.

Asked whether he was confident he could play against Toronto tonight, Drulia said, "That's what I'm here for."

STITCHED UP: Defenseman Pavel Kubina missed his first game in more than a month with an injured left index finger.

Kubina said he took nine stitches after a skate cut through his glove during the second period against Philadelphia on Thursday.

"My hand was kind of on the ice and one guy just skated over it," said Kubina, who has a team-high 64 blocked shots this season. "I didn't even feel it at first."

SCRATCHES: Defensemen Sergey Gusev and Kristian Kudroc were healthy scratches for the Lightning. Forwards Shawn Bates and Mikko Eloranta and defenseman Patrick Traverse were scratches for the Bruins.

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