Advertisement
  1. Archive

CYBERIA

A PLACE TO THINK:

Since its inception in 1963, the New York Review of Books, has, in its own words, "posed the questions in the debate on American life, culture, and politics." Its Web site (http://www.nybooks.com/nyrev/) includes material from current issues, archives and an audio section of readings from its 35th anniversary celebration.

A GUIDE FOR PARENTS:

The Internet has changed the definition of neighborhood in many ways. One of the most important for parents to consider is that child's play no longer just means walking over to a friend's house down the street for an afternoon. Now, a child can click around the Web to find people and places to visit. Parents need to understand the difference and set guidelines to ensure that their children are safe and making wise choices. Dr. Dave's Cyberhood: Making Media Choices that Create a Healthy Electronic Environment for Your Kids by David Walsh (Simon & Schuster, $13) offers topics ranging from creating rules for Internet use and what to do if the unexpected encounter occurs online to teaching children how to be critical consumers to choosing good TV shows.

TECH FOR TEENS:

Yes, your kids likely know more about technology than you do. And for the savviest who envision high-tech careers or who want to do more than just click and surf, Charles River Media (www.charlesriver.com) is starting a series of books. The first four books, $34.95 each, are: CyberRookies: Creating 3D Comics by Shamms Mortier (due in May); CyberRookies: 3D Game Creation by Luke Ahearn (June); CyberRookies Web Design by Kelly Valqui (June); and CyberRookies: Learning Computer Programming by Mary Farrell (September).

THE CIVIL WAR ON THE WEB:

The Civil War on the Web: A Guide to the Very Best Sites by William G. Thomas and Alice E. Carter (SR Books, $18.95) is a book/CD-ROM package that reviews 95 sites devoted to the war, rating each on a scale of one to five stars. It also lists more than 300 other sites, with links to all sites mentioned.

A FAIR EXCHANGE:

The idea behind BestSellersExchange.com (www.bestsellersexchange.com) is that people who have finished reading a book can swap it with other members offering books, music CDs, videos, DVDs and video games. Membership costs $11.66 a year for an unlimited number of exchanges, and it has no bidding or fees for the transactions.

Dave Gussow is the Times personal technology editor.

Up next:CHECK IT OUT

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

Advertisement
Advertisement