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Tampa man killed in Big Bend Road crash

A 67-year-old Tampa man was killed Tuesday when the Chevrolet Tracker he was riding in swerved to avoid an oncoming truck. Limas Brown of 1901 E Genessee was riding in the passenger seat of the Tracker headed east on Big Bend Road with three other people at about 4 p.m. A Ford pickup traveling west swerved around a bicyclist, according to the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office. The driver of the Tracker lost control and the Tracker flipped over. Brown was ejected. He was pronounced dead at the scene.

Astronomy club offers

chance to see comet

ST. PETERSBURG _ When the comet Ikeya-Zhang was discovered Feb. 1, astronomers thought it might put on a spectacular nighttime show during the next few months. It was brightening as it neared the sun, and some thought Ikeya-Zhang might be the return of a particularly bright comet last recorded in 1532.

Alas, no. Ikeya-Zhang is now thought to be the return of a lesser space traveler last witnessed on Earth in 1661. This is a "come-down of sorts," according to the Web site SPACE.com, because the 1661 comet was a "middle-of-the-road performer."

Nevertheless, the St. Petersburg Astronomy Club is offering a chance _ though not a particularly good one _ to see it.

Between 7:30 and 8:15 p.m. Saturday at the Science Center at 7701 22nd Ave. N, the club will have from 10 to 20 telescopes aimed just above the horizon in the west-northwest sky. Bring the kids and take a look, said club secretary Dan Bricker.

"I think it would be visible with the naked eye if we did not live in such a populated area," Bricker said. "I don't get excited about comets unless they have a tail, and this one does. But it will be gone by the end of next week."

Although the comet will be visible only until about 8:15, other features of the night sky can be viewed through the club's telescopes until 11 p.m., Bricker said.

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